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65

Do not store money values as float, use the DECIMAL or NUMERIC type: Documentation for MySQL Numeric Types EDIT & clarification: Float values are vulnerable to rounding errors are they have limited precision so unless you do not care that you only get 9.99 instead of 10.00 you should use DECIMAL/NUMERIC as they are fixed point numbers which do not ...


40

Ok, here's what I've come up with for a fixed-point struct, based on the link in my original question but also including some fixes to how it was handling division and multiplication, and added logic for modules, comparisons, shifts, etc: public struct FInt { public long RawValue; public const int SHIFT_AMOUNT = 12; //12 is 4096 public const ...


25

You can try my fixed point class: // From http://www.codef00.com/code/Fixed.h // See also: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/79677/whats-the-best-way-to-do-fixed-point-math /* * Copyright (c) 2008 * Evan Teran * * Permission to use, copy, modify, and distribute this software and its * documentation for any purpose and without fee is hereby granted, ...


24

In modern C++ implementations, there will be no performance penalty for using simple and lean abstractions, such as concrete classes. Fixed-point computation is precisely the place where using a properly engineered class will save you from lots of bugs. Therefore, you should write a FixedPoint8 class. Test and debug it thoroughly. If you have to convince ...


21

It's not generally a good idea to store money as a float as rounding errors can occurr in calculations. Consider using DECIMAL(10,2) instead.


21

bc will do this for you, but the order is important. > echo "scale = 2; 20 * 100 / 30" | bc 66.66 > echo "scale = 2; 20 / 30 * 100" | bc 66.00 or, for your specific case: > export ach_gs=2 > export ach_gs_max=3 > x=$(echo "scale = 2; $ach_gs * 100 / $ach_gs_max" | bc) > echo $x 66.66 Whatever method you choose, this is ripe for ...


20

Here you go: // A signed fixed-point 16:16 class class FixedPoint_16_16 { short intPart; unsigned short fracPart; public: FixedPoint_16_16(double d) { *this = d; // calls operator= } FixedPoint_16_16& operator=(double d) { intPart = static_cast<short>(d); fracPart = ...


19

Fixed point combinator finds the least-defined fixed point of a function, which is ⊥ in your case (non-termination indeed is undefined value). You can check, that in your case (\x -> x * x) ⊥ = ⊥ i.e. ⊥ really is fixed point of \x -> x * x. As for why is fix defined that way: the main point of fix is to allow you use anonymous recursion and for ...


18

It's still worth it. Floating point is faster than in the past, but fixed-point is also. And fixed is still the only way to go if you care about precision beyond that guaranteed by IEEE 754.


17

In situations where you are dealing with very large amounts of data, fixed point can be twice as memory efficient, e.g. a four byte long integer as opposed to an eight byte double. A technique often used in large geospatial datasets is to reduce all the data to a common origin, such that the most significant bits can be disposed of, and work with fixed ...


17

Oracle's BINARY_FLOAT stores the data internally using IEEE 754 floating-point representation, like C and many other languages do. When you fetch them from the database, and typically store them in an IEEE 754 data type in the host language, it's able to copy the value without transforming it. Whereas Oracle's FLOAT data type is a synonym for the ANSI SQL ...


15

Those parameters don't represent integers. They represent real numbers in fixed-point format with 15 bits to the right of the radix point. For instance, 1.0 is represented by 1 << 15 = 0x8000, 0.5 is 0x4000, -0.5 is 0xC000 (or 0xFFFFC000 in 32 bits). Adding fixed-point numbers is simple, because you can just add their integer representation. But if ...


14

Meta-answer: Is it really a general 4x4 matrix? If your matrix has a special form, then there are direct formulas for inverting that would be fast and keep your operation count down. For example, if it's a standard homogenous coordinate transform from graphics, like: [ux vx wx tx] [uy vy wy ty] [uz vz wz tz] [ 0 0 0 1] (assuming a composition of ...


14

Does it really matter if it stores is as 3.5, 3.50 or even 3.500? What is really important is how it is displayed after it is retrieved from the db. Or am I missing something here? Also don't use a float, use a decimal. Float has all sorts of rounding issue and isn't very big.


13

Using the decimal module, you can see the series also has a solution converging at 2000: from decimal import Decimal, getcontext getcontext().prec = 100 u0=Decimal(3) / Decimal(2) u1=Decimal(5) / Decimal(3) u=[u0, u1] for i in range(100): un1 = 2003 - 6002/u[-1] + 4000/(u[-1]*u[-2]) u.append(un1) print un1 The recurrence relation has multiple ...


12

A very simple solution is to use a decent table-driven approximation. You don't actually need a lot of data if you reduce your inputs correctly. exp(a)==exp(a/2)*exp(a/2), which means you really only need to calculate exp(x) for 1 < x < 2. Over that range, a runga-kutta approximation would give reasonable results with ~16 entries IIRC. Similarly, ...


11

Given that sqrt(ab) = sqrt(a)sqrt(b), then can't you just trap the case where your number is small and shift it up by a given number of bits, compute the root and shift that back down by half the number of bits to get the result? I.e. sqrt(n) = sqrt(n.2^k)/sqrt(2^k) = sqrt(n.2^k).2^(-k/2) E.g. Choose k = 28 for any n less than 2^8.


10

Just for the record, I will answer my own question. TL;DR: fixed-point types extension is supported for the ARM Cortex-M/R architecture in the embedded branch of gcc (version 4.6 and later). A toolchain based on that gcc branch is found here. Long answer: At the time of writing, the summon-arm-toolchain downloads by default linaro-gcc-4.5-2011.02 (or ...


10

You are saying emulation is too slow. I guess you mean emulation of floating point. The only remaining alternative if scaled integers are not sufficient, is fixed point math but it's not exactly fast either, even though it's much faster than emulated float. Also, you are never going to escape the fact that with both scaled integers, and fixed point math, ...


10

The Oracle BINARY_FLOAT and BINARY_DOUBLE are mostly equivalent to the IEEE 754 standard but they are definitely not stored internally in the standard IEEE 754 representation. For example, a BINARY_DOUBLE takes 9 bytes of storage vs. IEEE's 8. Also the double floating number -3.0 is represented as 3F-F7-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF which if you use real IEEE would be ...


10

Another good reason to use fixed decimal is that rounding is much simpler and predictable. Most of the financial software uses fixed point arbitrary precision decimals with half-even rounding to represent money.


10

A cast from float to integer will throw away the fractional portion so if you want to keep that fraction around as fixed point then you just multiply the float before casting it. The below code will not check for overflow mind you. If you want 16:16 double f = 1.2345; int n; n=(int)(f*65536); if you want 24:8 double f = 1.2345; int n; n=(int)(f*256); ...


9

uint16_t is an unsigned 16-bit integer. uint_fast16_t is the fastest available unsigned integer with at least 16 bits.


9

There's quite a bit going on here, from the mechanics of lazy evaluation, to the definition of a fixed point to the method of finding a fixed point. In short, I believe you may be incorrectly interchanging the fixed point of function application in the lambda calculus with your needs. It may be helpful to note that your implementation of finding the ...


9

To store values you can use a DECIMAL(10,2) field, then you can use the FORMAT function: SELECT FORMAT(`price`, 2) FROM `table` WHERE 1 = 1


9

Software-emulated IEEE floats/doubles are slow because of many edge cases one needs to check for and properly handle. +/-infinity in input Not-A-Number in input +/-0 in input normalized vs denormalized number in input and the implicit '1' in the mantissa unpacking and packing normalization/denormalization under- and overflow checks correct rounding, which ...


8

The idea behind fixed-point arithmetic is that you store the values multiplied by a certain amount, use the multiplied values for all calculus, and divide it by the same amount when you want the result. The purpose of this technique is to use integer arithmetic (int, long...) while still being able to represent fractions. The usual and most efficient way of ...


8

The modular division operator '%' can be used to get the remainder of a division in JS. This means that if we perform the modular division of a floating point number by 1, we get the value after the decimal point. Further, if we build a loop where we multiply by 10 until there is no longer anything after the decimal point, we can find the smallest power of ...


8

In the gaming industry this is referred to as deterministic lockstep, and is very important for real-time networked games where the clients and server need to be in agreement about the state of physics objects (players, projectiles, deformable terrain etc). According to Glenn Fiedler's article on Floating Point Determinism, the answer is "a resoundingly ...


8

To address the question 'Does GCC support these through an extension', we can quote from 'Using the GNU Compiler Collection' (for GCC version 4.4.0 — bullet points added to clarify). (The GCC 4.9.0 URL equivalent is Fixed Point — Using the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC), but the section is 6.15 instead of 5.13.) §5.13 Fixed-Point Types ...



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