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362

You can use concat to merge arrays: var arrays = [["$6"], ["$12"], ["$25"], ["$25"], ["$18"], ["$22"], ["$10"], ["$0"], ["$15"],["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"], ["$100"], ["$7"], ["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"]]; var merged = [].concat.apply([], arrays); Using the apply method of concat will just take the second parameter as an array, so the last line is identical to ...


190

Using generator functions can make your example a little easier to read and probably boost the performance. def flatten(l): for el in l: if isinstance(el, collections.Iterable) and not isinstance(el, basestring): for sub in flatten(el): yield sub else: yield el I used the Iterable ABC added in ...


172

As of PHP 5.3 the shortest solution seems to be array_walk_recursive() with the new closures syntax: function flatten(array $array) { $return = array(); array_walk_recursive($array, function($a) use (&$return) { $return[] = $a; }); return $return; }


152

Here's a simple and performant functional solution: > [].concat.apply([], [[1],[2,3],[4]]) [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ] No imperative mess.


125

You can use the Standard PHP Library (SPL) to "hide" the recursion. $a = array(1,2,array(3,4, array(5,6,7), 8), 9); $it = new RecursiveIteratorIterator(new RecursiveArrayIterator($a)); foreach($it as $v) { echo $v, " "; } prints 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


59

Iterables.concat satisfies that requirement: static <T> Iterable<T> concat(Iterable<? extends Iterable<? extends T>> inputs) http://guava-libraries.googlecode.com/svn/tags/release09/javadoc/com/google/common/collect/Iterables.html#concat(java.lang.Iterable)


53

Here's a short function that uses some of the newer JavaScript array methods to flatten an n-dimensional array. function flatten(arr) { return arr.reduce(function (flat, toFlatten) { return flat.concat(Array.isArray(toFlatten) ? flatten(toFlatten) : toFlatten); }, []); } Usage: flatten([[1, 2, 3], [4, 5]]); // [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] flatten([[[1, ...


50

You can use jQuery.map, which is the way to go if you have the jQuery Library already loaded. $.map( [1, 2, [3, 4], [5, 6], 7], function(n){ return n; }); Returns [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]


47

You could simply use the flatten function in the compiler.ast module. >>> from compiler.ast import flatten >>> flatten([0, [1, 2], [3, 4, [5, 6]], 7]) [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]


44

It can be best done by javascript reduce function. var arrays = [["$6"], ["$12"], ["$25"], ["$25"], ["$18"], ["$22"], ["$10"], ["$0"], ["$15"],["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"], ["$100"], ["$7"], ["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"]]; arrays = arrays.reduce(function(a, b){ return a.concat(b); }); js-fiddle Mozilla docs


42

You want jQuery.param: var str = $.param({ cost: 12345, insertBy: 'testUser' }); // "cost=12345&insertBy=testUser" Note that this is the function used internally by jQuery to serialize objects passed as the data argument.


42

Here's a non-jQuery version: function toQueryString(obj) { var parts = []; for (var i in obj) { if (obj.hasOwnProperty(i)) { parts.push(encodeURIComponent(i) + "=" + encodeURIComponent(obj[i])); } } return parts.join("&"); }


33

The reset_index() is a pandas DataFrame method that will transfer index values into the DataFrame as columns. The default setting for the parameter is drop=False (which will keep the index values as columns). All you have to do add .reset_index(inplace=True) after the name of the DataFrame: df.reset_index(inplace=True)


31

Use the power of JavaScript: var a = [[1, 2], 3, [4, 5]]; console.log( Array.prototype.concat.apply([], a) ); //will output [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]


30

Solution for 2 dimensional array Please try this : $array = your array $result = call_user_func_array('array_merge', $array); echo "<pre>"; print_r($result); EDIT : 21-Aug-13 Here is the solution which works for multi-dimensional array : function array_flatten($array) { $return = array(); foreach ($array as $key => $value) { ...


29

Here's an extension method that does the job: // Depth-first traversal, recursive public static IEnumerable<T> Flatten<T>( this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, IEnumerable<T>> childrenSelector) { foreach (var item in source) { yield return item; foreach (var child in ...


29

apply does what you want: var target = [1,2]; var source = [3,4,5]; target.push.apply(target, source); alert(target); // 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 MDC - apply Calls a function with a given this value and arguments provided as an array.


27

Generator version of @unutbu's non-recursive solution, as requested by @Andrew in a comment: def genflat(l, ltypes=collections.Sequence): l = list(l) i = 0 while i < len(l): while isinstance(l[i], ltypes): if not l[i]: l.pop(i) i -= 1 break else: ...


26

If you mean a jagged array (T[][]), SelectMany is your friend. If, however, you mean a rectangular array (T[,]), then you can just enumerate the date data via foreach - or: int[,] from = new int[,] {{1,2},{3,4},{5,6}}; int[] to = from.Cast<int>().ToArray();


26

My solution: def flatten(x): if isinstance(x, collections.Iterable): return [a for i in x for a in flatten(i)] else: return [x] A little more concise, but pretty much the same.


23

Something like this should work: function flatten($array, $prefix = '') { $result = array(); foreach($array as $key=>$value) { if(is_array($value)) { $result = $result + flatten($value, $prefix . $key . '.'); } else { $result[$prefix . $key] = $value; } } return $result; } DEMO


22

You could use the concat method: var num1 = [1, 2, 3]; var num2 = [4, 5, 6]; var num3 = [7, 8, 9]; // creates array [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]; num1, num2, num3 are unchanged var nums = num1.concat(num2, num3);


21

It's a shame that flatten doesn't exist. It should. Flatten does exist now. As before, s getOrElse None (in addition to the other answers) will also do the same thing.


21

The algorithm is mostly the same. If you have a 3D array Original[HEIGHT, WIDTH, DEPTH] then you could turn it into Flat[HEIGHT * WIDTH * DEPTH] by Flat[x + WIDTH * (y + DEPTH * z)] = Original[x, y, z] As an aside, you should prefer arrays of arrays over multi-dimensional arrays in .NET. The performance differences are significant


21

One level of flattening using map $ref = [[1,2,3,4],[5,6,7,8]]; # AoA @a = map {@$_} @$ref; # flattens it print "@a"; # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


19

A slight generalization to Alexander's answer - np.reshape can take -1 as an argument, meaning "total array size divided by product of all other listed dimensions": e.g. to flatten all but the last dimension: >>> arr = numpy.zeros((50,100,25)) >>> new_arr = arr.reshape(-1, arr.shape[-1]) >>> new_arr.shape # (5000, 25)


18

An error like this happens when the type signature you specify does not match the actual type of the function. Since you didn't show the code that causes the error, I have to guess, but I presume you changed it to something like this: flatmap _ [] = [] flatmap f (x:xs) = f x ++ flatmap f xs Which as it happens, is perfectly correct. However if you ...


18

To flatten w/o recursion (as you have asked for), you can use a stack. Naturally you can put this into a function of it's own like array_flatten. The following is a version that works w/o keys:. function array_flatten(array $array) { $flat = array(); // initialize return array $stack = array_values($array); // initialize stack while($stack) // ...


18

Interesting non-trivial problem! MAJOR UPDATE With all that's happened, I've rewrote the answer and removed some dead ends. I also timed the various solutions on different cases. Here's the first, rather simple but slow, solution: flatten1 <- function(x) { y <- list() rapply(x, function(x) y <<- c(y,x)) y } rapply lets you traverse a ...


17

This version of flatten avoids python's recursion limit (and thus works with arbitrarily deep, nested iterables). It is a generator which can handle strings and arbitrary iterables (even infinite ones). import itertools as IT import collections def flatten(iterable, ltypes=collections.Iterable): remainder = iter(iterable) while True: first ...



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