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51

The [] is a flexible array member. They do not count towards the total size of the struct, because the C standard explicitly says so: 6.7.2.1/18 As a special case, the last element of a structure with more than one named member may have an incomplete array type; this is called a flexible array member. In most situations, the flexible array member is ...


26

The reason I would give for not doing it is that it's not worth it to tie your code to C99 just to use this feature. The point is that you can always use the following idiom: struct header { size_t len; unsigned char data[1]; }; That is fully portable. Then you can take the 1 into account when allocating the memory for n elements in the array data : ...


24

Yes this is a C-Hack. To create an array of any length: struct someData* mallocSomeData(int size) { struct someData* result = (struct someData*)malloc(sizeof(struct someData) + size * sizeof(BYTE)); if (result) { result->nData = size; } return result; } Now you have an object of someData with an array of a specified length.


22

There are, unfortunately, several reasons why you would declare a zero length array at the end of a structure. It essentially gives you the ability to have a variable length structure returned from an API. Raymond Chen did an excellent blog post on the subject. I suggest you take a look at this post because it likely contains the answer you want. Note ...


21

This is an old C hack to allow a flexible sized arrays. In C99 standard this is not neccessary as it supports the arr[] syntax.


12

C++ was first standardized in 1998, so it predates the addition of flexible array members to C (which was new in C99). There was a corrigendum to C++ in 2003, but that didn't add any relevant new features. The next revision of C++ (C++0x) is still under development, and it seems flexible array members aren't added to it.


11

From C99 onwards the size of an array at the end of a struct may be omitted. For purposes of sizeof(struct) this array will appear to have zero size (although its presence may add some padding to the struct), but the intent is for its length to be flexible, i.e., when allocating space for the struct one must allocate the desired amount of extra space for the ...


10

It is an accepted "fact" that using goto is poor software engineering practice. That doesn't make it true. There are times when goto is useful, particualarly when handling cleanup and when porting from assembler. Flexible array members strike me as one main use, off the top of my head, which is mapping legacy data formats like window template formats on ...


10

This is C99 feature called flexible arrays, the main feature is to allow the use variable length array like features inside a struct and R.. in this answer to another question on flexible array members provides a list of benefits to using flexible arrays over pointers. The draft C99 standard in section 6.7.2.1 Structure and union specifiers paragraph 16 ...


10

This is C++, so templates are available: template <int N> struct hack { int filler; int thing [N]; }; Casting between different pointers to different instantiations will be the difficult issue, then.


9

Pointers are not arrays. The basic reasons for choosing which to use are the same as they always are with arrays versus pointers. In the special case of flexible array members, here are some reasons you may prefer them over a pointer: Reducing storage requirements. A pointer will enlarge your structure by (typically) 4 or 8 bytes, and you'll spend much ...


8

expr_t *e = malloc (sizeof (expr_t) + n * sizeof (expr_t *)); is well defined in C99. From the C99 specification 6.7.2.1.16: As a special case, the last element of a structure with more than one named member may have an incomplete array type; this is called a flexible array member. In most situations, the flexible array member is ignored. In ...


8

You can get more or less the same effect using a member function and a reinterpret_cast: int* buffer() { return reinterpret_cast<int*>(this + 1); } This has one major defect: it doesn't guarantee correct alignment. For example, something like: struct Hack { char size; int* buffer() { return reinterpret_cast<int*>(this + 1); } }; ...


7

You meant... struct header { size_t len; unsigned char data[]; }; In C, that's a common idiom. I think many compilers also accept: unsigned char data[0]; Yes, it's dangerous, but then again, it's really no more dangerous than normal C arrays - i.e., VERY dangerous ;-) . Use it with care and only in circumstances where you truly need an array of ...


7

The first thing that comes to mind is DON't, don't write C in C++. In 99.99% of the cases this hack is not needed, won't make any noticeable improvement in performance over just holding a std::vector and will complicate your life and that of the other maintainers of the project in which you deploy this. If you want a standard compliant approach, provide a ...


6

C++ doesn't support C99 flexible array members at the end of structures, either using an empty index notation or a 0 index notation (barring vendor-specific extensions): struct blah { int count; int foo[]; // not valid C++ }; struct blah { int count; int foo[0]; // also not valid C++ }; As far as I know, C++0x will not add this, either. ...


6

The C FAQ answers precisely this question. The quick answer is that this structure will include the double array inside the structure rather than a pointer to an array outside the structure. As a quick example, you could use your structure as in this example: struct s mystruct = malloc(sizeof(struct s) + 5 * sizeof(double)); s.n = 12; s.d[0] = 4.0; s.d[1] ...


5

The second one will not contain elements but rather will point right after blah. So if you have a structure like this: struct something { int a, b; int c[0]; }; you can do things like this: struct something *val = (struct something *)malloc(sizeof(struct something) + 5 * sizeof(int)); val->a = 1; val->b = 2; val->c[0] = 3; In this case c ...


5

What you do is valid, but accessing s->string[0] or feeding s->string to any function accessing the data is invalid. The C99 Standard actually says (§6.7.2.1): struct s { int n; double d[]; }; ... struct s t1 = { 0 }; // valid ... The assignment to t1.d[0] is probably undefined behavior, but it is possible that sizeof (struct s) >= ...


5

You're using undefined behaviour and probably running into a compiler bug at the same time. Note that GCC 4.9.0 (compiled on an Ubuntu 12.04 derivative but running on an Ubuntu 14.04 derivative) gives lots of errors for this trivial adaptation of your code: #include <stdio.h> #include <stdint.h> struct table_type { uint8_t a; uint8_t b; ...


4

malloc itself doesn't care at all how much memory you allocate for a structure, it's the dereferencing of memory outside the block that is undefined. From C99 6.5.3.2 Address and indirection operators: If an invalid value has been assigned to the pointer, the behavior of the unary * operator is undefined. And, from 7.20.3 Memory management functions, ...


4

You have to actually allocate space for your flexible array member! This line: myStruct my; Only makes enough stack space for size (or myVar and size from your second example). It appears that in your failing case you're overwriting a on the stack, but really both cases are wrong. To fix your problem, you need to allocate space for the floats[] member ...


4

I've seen something like this: from C interface and implementation. struct header { size_t len; unsigned char *data; }; struct header *p; p = malloc(sizeof(*p) + len + 1 ); p->data = (unsigned char*) (p + 1 ); // memory after p is mine! Note: data need not be last member.


4

No, flexible arrays must always be allocated manually. But you may use calloc to initialize the flexible part and a compound literal to initialize the fixed part. I'd wrap that in an allocation inline function like this: typedef struct person { unsigned age; char sex; size_t size; char name[]; } person; inline person* alloc_person(int a, char s, ...


4

Even in C, this is undefined and non-portable. GCC knowingly lets you get away with it, but other implementations may not. This is because you are accessing an array beyond its bounds. This "trick" is precisely as valid in C++ as it is in C. That is, feel free to use it in GCC where the GCC documentation says it's supported, but it'll never be ...


4

C++ does not have the concept of "flexible arrays". The only way to have a flexible array in C++ is to use a dynamic array - which leads you to use int* things. You will need a size parameter if you are attempting to read this data from a file so that you can create the appropriate sized array (or use a std::vector and just keep reading until you reach the ...


4

If you really you feel the need to use a hack, why not just use struct hack { char filler; int things[1]; }; followed by hack_p = malloc(sizeof(struct hack)+(N-1)*sizeof int)); Or don't even bother about the -1 and live with a little extra space.


4

The two structs in your post don't have the same structure at all. h1 has a integer and a pointer to char. h2 has an integer, and an array of characters inline (number of elements determined at runtime, possibly none). Said differently, in h2 the character data is inside the struct. In h1 it has to be somewhere outside. This makes a lot of difference. For ...


4

Your intution about "why not use an array of size 1" is spot on. The code is doing the "C struct hack" wrong, because declarations of zero length arrays are a constraint violation. This means that a compiler can reject your hack right off the bat at compile time with a diagnostic message that stops the translation. If we want to perpetrate a hack, we must ...


4

It's not valid per the standard. I'm not sure how reliable it is in practice. C11 (ISO/IEC 9899:2011), §6.7.2.1.3 says the following (emphasis mine): A structure or union shall not contain a member with incomplete or function type (hence, a structure shall not contain an instance of itself, but may contain a pointer to an instance of itself), except ...



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