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5

I'm surprised this does not work because I explicitly define the associativity of my operations when it matters. For example in the following code I but parentheses where it matters. This is exactly what -fassociative-math does: it ignores the ordering defined by your program (which is just as defined without the parentheses) and does what allows ...


5

It has to do with the byte representation of 1.143139e+27, which is exactly Fell, but without the terminating nul byte. You can do the reverse process, like #include <stdio.h> int main() { char b[] = {'F', 'e', 'l', 'l'}; fprintf(stdout, "%g\n", *(float *)b); return 0; } and even add a terminating nul byte, #include <stdio.h> ...


4

Floating-point addition is not associative. x+e-x is grouped as (x+e)-x. It adds x and e, rounds the result to the nearest representable number (which is 1), then subtracts x from the result and rounds again, producing 0. x-x+e is grouped as (x-x)+e. It subtracts x from x, producing 0, and rounds it to the nearest representable number, which is 0. It then ...


4

In C, check if this is defined: __STDC_IEC_559__ In C++, check if this is true: std::numeric_limits<double>::is_iec559() IEC559, short for International Electrotechnical Commission standard 559,is the same as IEEE 754.


3

The answer for C++ is here: How to check if C++ compiler uses IEEE 754 floating point standard For C, Annex F of the current C Standard specifies that the preprocessor constant __STDC_IEC_559__ will be pre-defined to the value 1 if the platform conforms to the IEEE 754 specification for floating point arithmetic. But older C compilers may not pre-define it ...


3

zahl1 / i is computed as int division and then converted to Float by the Float constructor. For floating point division, cast one of the operands to float or double: ws = new Float((float)zahl1 / i);


3

When you divide two ints you perform integer division, which, in this case will result in 22/64 = 0. Only once this is done are you creating a float. And the float representation of 0 is 0.0. If you want to perform floating point division, you should cast before dividing: ws = ((float) zahl1) / i;


3

Let's start with the first question. It isn't explicitly stated, but I think we can assume we're dealing with little-endian here (every PC you'll get to use today will use that). Thus, if you execute FLD m64p on that memory location, the floating point stack will contain these bytes in reversed order - i.e. 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 01. Let's look what the ...


2

This is because of the way that computers represent floating point numbers. This is all really in binary format but let's pretend that it works with base 10 numbers because that's a lot easier for us to relate to. A floating point number is expressed on the form 0.x*10^y where x is a 10-digit number (I'm omitting trailing zeroes here) and y is the ...


2

Make sure you never divide by zero According to this page, the values are like below:


2

It's because you're doing integer division,you need to change the int value as float at first. float ws = (float) zahl1 / i;


2

Just access the first item of the list/array, using the index access and the index 0: >>> list_ = [4] >>> list_[0] 4 >>> array_ = np.array([4]) >>> array_[0] 4 This will be an int since that was what you inserted in the first place. If you need it to be a float for some reason, you can call float() on it then: ...


1

I would simply use, np.asarray(input, dtype=np.float)[0] If input is an ndarray of the right dtype, there is no overhead, since np.asarray does nothing in this case. if input is a list, np.asarray makes sure the output is of the right type.


1

You could use std::numeric_limits<double>'s is_iec559 - see here


1

try: float ws = (float)zahl1/i;


1

Your min and max values are the same therefore you end up dividing by zero. Dividing by 0 gives the result of Inf (Infinity). Fix the problem by properly initializing your _minimumValue and _maximumValue so they have proper and different values.


1

This is needed in order (li + ls) / 2 to work correctly. For example: 0.999 - 0.9981 = 0.0009 < 0.001 but: (0.999 + 0.9981) / 2 = 0.99855 On the other hand: (0.9999 + 0.9998) / 2 = 0.99985 which rounds up to 1, when rounding to 3rd digit.


1

You cant multiply or devise float and decimal.Decimal() types, what I would suggest is multiplying by Decimal('0.0023') and Decimal('0.5'): for a in range(0,size) et = Decimal('0.0023')*ralist[rows[a][2]] * ( Decimal('0.5')*(rows[a][3] + rows[a][4]) + 17.8 ) * ( rows[a][3] - rows[a][4])**(0.5) eto_values.insert(a,et)


1

I dont know exactly what you are doing but this: #include<stdio.h> int main() { int changeI, newI; float change = 0.41, var = change * 100; changeI = (int)(change*100); newI = (int)(var); printf("%f", var); //prints 41.000000 printf("int = %d\n", changeI); //prints 40 printf("float = %f", change); //prints 0.410000 ...


1

I ran into this issue today, and I came up with a different solution. If you're worried about what it looks like when printed, you can replace the stdout file object with a custom one that, when write() is called, searches for any things that look like floats, and replaces them with your own format for them. class ProcessedFile(object): def ...



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