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23

No, flock does NOT prevent anyone from doing anything. Unix locks are ADVISORY, which means that they prevent other processes from also calling flock (or in the case of a shared lock, prevent another process using an exclusive one). It doesn't stop root, or anyone else, from reading, writing or deleting the file. In any case, even if it was a mandatory ...


18

The real problem here is not how to implement locks, it's how to forge serializability. The way you're taught to achieve serializability in a pre- or non-database world is through locks and semaphores. The basic idea is this: lock() modify a bunch of shared memory unlock() That way, when you have two concurrent users, you can be certain that neither ...


16

flock -n -e 200 || exit 1 flock -n tells you it failed by returning a failure code (something other than zero). You could instead do set -e at the top of your script to make it exit when it sees any unchecked error. Depending on your application, you might want to exit 0 to indicate success when the lock can't be acquired.


15

Theres nothing special about the number 200. It just happens to be the example used in the man page of the flock command; and it happens to be a large number, so it's unlikely to conflict with the the file descriptor of any other file you open during your script. In your comment, you ask about: ( flock -e 200 echo "In critical section" sleep 5 ) ...


8

We use exclusive lock on the script file itself, $0 is the name of command file. exec 200<$0 flock -n 200 || exit 1 The whole solution is in two lines of code. But the trick is to open $0 for reading and then obtain exclusive lock for it.


7

There is no alternative available to safely achieve the same under all imaginary possible circumstances. That's by design of computer systems and the job is not trivial for cross-platform code. If you need to make safe use of flock(), document the requirements for your application instead. Alternatively you can create your own locking mechanism, however ...


7

Your problem may be fairly mundane. Namely, false || ( exit 1 ) Does not cause the script to exit. Rather, the exit instructs the subshell to exit. So change your first line to: flock -n -e 200 || { echo "This script is currently being run"; exit 1; } >&2


7

Use Timeout Module with Exclusive Locks You can use the Timeout module to set a duration for #flock to acquire an exclusive lock. The following example will raise Timeout::Error: execution expired, which can then be rescued in whatever way seems appropriate for the application. Returning nil when the timer expires allows the #flock expression to be tested ...


7

You can also use a POSIX mutex in shared memory; you just have to set the "pshared" attribute on it first. See pthread_mutexattr_setpshared. This is arguably the most direct way to do what you want. That said, you can also call sem_unlink on your named semaphore while you are still using it. This will remove it from the file system, but the underlying ...


6

Is the Fcntl module installed? Try this: perl.exe -MFcntl -e 1 If it complains, you don't have the Fcntl module installed. If it doesn't complain, then you have access to Fcntl::flock, so put this in your script: use Fcntl qw(:DEFAULT :flock); and off you go.


6

Here's a simple example that highlights the danger of simultaneous wites: <?php for($i = 0; $i < 100; $i++) { $pid = pcntl_fork(); //only spawn more children if we're not a child ourselves if(!$pid) break; } $fh = fopen('test.txt', 'a'); //The following is a simple attempt to get multiple threads to start at the same time. $until = ...


6

flock() doesn't actually prevent you from reading/writing to a file, it only allows you to "communicate" the ideas of locking to other scripts. You can detect if there is a lock on a file using the snippet you posted.


6

When using Apache+PHP I was tricked into believing LOCK_NB was ignored (it wasn't, it was the browser waiting for the first request to finish). Because I was making 2 requests with the same browser, the browser was waiting for the first call to finish before making the next one (even ignoring a "Connection: close" header). Using 2 separate browsers (in my ...


5

You're using a lexical filehandle scoped inside the sub. When check_instances returns, the filehandle is automatically closed, which releases the lock. So you'll never see a conflict unless two copies check at exactly the same time. Ensure that the filehandle remains open as long as the script is running (or as long as you want to maintain the lock). For ...


5

If there are multiple processes waiting for an exclusive lock, it's not specified which one succeeds in acquiring it first. Don't rely on any particular ordering. Having said that, the current kernel code wakes them in the order they blocked. This comment is in fs/locks.c: /* Insert waiter into blocker's block list. * We use a circular list so that ...


5

The issue is that, if the flock process fails to get the lock within the timeout, it has no way of killing the parent process (i.e. the shell that spawned it) - all it can do is return a failure return code. You need to check that return code before continuing: flock <params> && <do other stuff> so ( ( flock -x 200 ; sleep 10 ; echo ...


5

I do have high-performance, multi-threaded application, where all threads are writing (appending) to single log file. So-far did not notice any problems with that, each thread writes multiple times per second and nothing gets lost. I think just appending to huge file should be no issue. But if you want to modify already existing content, especially with ...


5

You ask: isn't there a chance that someone else will edit the file between the fopen call and the flock call? and the same question for fread Yes, no, maybe. Short answer: assume "yes" and act carefully. Yes, in that traditional flock()-based locking is merely advisory, so other processes (or even the same process) are free to disregard the locks. ...


5

As described in the docs, use LOCK_NB to make a non-blocking attempt to obtain the lock, and on failure check the $wouldblock argument to see if something else holds the lock. if (!flock($fp, LOCK_EX|LOCK_NB, $wouldblock)) { if ($wouldblock) { // something already has a lock } else { // couldn't lock for some other reason } } ...


5

If you mean between Erlang processes, no, it has inter-process lock mechanisms. That is not the Erlang way of controlling access to a shared resource. Generally if you want to control access to a resource you have an Erlang process which manages the resource and all access to the resource goes through this process. This means we have no need for ...


5

flock is a wrapper for the system call of the same name. $! is set by the system. So consult the system's documentation for your answer. On my system, as per man 2 flock, EBADF: fd is not an open file descriptor. EINTR: While waiting to acquire a lock, the call was interrupted by delivery of a signal caught by a handler; see signal(7). EINVAL: ...


5

That means $fh doesn't contain a file handle. That's because you incorrectly checked if sysopen succeeded. Specifically, you are suffering from a precedence issue. sysopen $fh, $path, O_RDWR|O_CREAT || die qq{Cannot open "$path": $!\n}; means sysopen $fh, $path, ( O_RDWR|O_CREAT || die qq{Cannot open "$path": $!\n} ); which means sysopen $fh, $path, ...


4

It looks like you can use the alternate form of flock, flock <fd>, where <fd> is a file descriptor. If you put this into a subshell, and redirect that file descriptor to your lock file, then flock will wait until it can write to that file (or error out if it can't open it immediately and you've passed -n). You can then do everything in your ...


4

MarkR is correct chattr'ing the file will prevent it from being deleted. -(~)-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------(08:40 Mon Mar 29) risk@DockMaster [2135] --> sudo chattr +i junk.txt [sudo] password for risk: ...


4

The only suggestion I would make is to make your exception handling a little more specific. You don't want to accidentally delete the fcntl import one day and hide the NameError that results. Always try to catch the most specific exception you want to handle. In this case, I suggest something like: import errno try: fcntl.lock(...) except IOError, ...


3

flock locks don't care about threads--in fact, they don't care about processes, either. If you take the same file descriptor in two processes (inherited through a fork), either process locking the file with that FD will acquire a lock for both processes. In other words, in the following code both flock calls will return success: the child process locks the ...


3

Google Chrome for Mac has added the AppleScripting method for getting the URL. Here's the Chromium AppleScript SDK https://sites.google.com/a/chromium.org/dev/developers/design-documents/applescript Example from the page linked below: tell application "Google Chrome" get URL of active tab of window 1 end tell More examples here: ...


3

Activate UI scripting and run the code below. You will then have the URL in the clipboard and you can paste it. tell application "Firefox" to activate tell application "System Events" keystroke "l" using command down keystroke "c" using command down end tell


3

If concurrency is an issue, you should really be using databases.


3

You should check this comment on the flock docs page. Essentially, flock will pause execution until it is able to obtain the lock. Take the following code, which is similar to your situation above: $file = 'file.txt'; $first = fopen($file, "w"); flock($first, LOCK_EX); $second = fopen($file, "w"); # Your script will pause on the next line until timeout ...



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