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27

According to the documentation of imfill in MATLAB: BW2 = imfill(BW,'holes'); %# fills holes in the binary image BW. A hole is a set %# of background pixels that cannot be reached by filling in the background %# from the edge of the image. Therefore to get the "holes" pixels, make a call to cvFloodFill with the left corner pixel of the image as a seed. ...


15

Why don't you use the second variant of cv::floodFill to create a mask? int floodFill(InputOutputArray image, InputOutputArray mask, Point seedPoint, Scalar newVal, Rect* rect=0, Scalar loDiff=Scalar(), Scalar upDiff=Scalar(), int flags=4 ) Original image cv::Mat img = cv::imread("squares.png"); First variant cv::floodFill(img, ...


13

Just implement a stack of int pairs with an array of some fixed size (maybe the size of the image in pixels or the square root of that, for example) for the stack and track the top with an int. Here is some C# code that implements floodfill non-recursively: private static void Floodfill(byte[,] vals, Point q, byte SEED_COLOR, byte COLOR) { int h = ...


13

As a heuristic, you could construct a graph where each node represents a set of contiguous, same-colour squares, and each node is connected to those it touches. (Each edge weighted as 1). You could then use a path-finding algorithm to calculate the "distance" from the top left to all other nodes. Then, by looking the results of flood-filling using each of ...


12

All zero-valued pixels in the same connected component as the seed point of the mask are replaced by the value you specify. This value must be added to the flags parameter, left-shifted by 8 bits: uchar fillValue = 128; cv::floodFill(img, mask, seed, cv::Scalar(255) ,0, cv::Scalar(), cv::Scalar(), 4 | cv::FLOODFILL_MASK_ONLY | (fillValue << 8)); A ...


12

Somebody ported J. Dunlap's Queue-Linear Flood Fill Algorithm to android here. I've tried it and it's pretty fast. I've modified the copyImage() method which originally makes use of a class called Utilities which the author hasn't provided. public class QueueLinearFloodFiller { protected Bitmap image = null; protected int[] tolerance = new int[] { ...


11

the cvDrawContours function has an option to fill the contours that you have drawn. Here is a short example cvDrawContours( IplImage, contours, color, color, -1, CV_FILLED, 8 ); Here is the documentation http://opencv.willowgarage.com/documentation/drawing_functions.html?highlight=cvdrawcontours#cvDrawContours I guess you posted this a long time ago, ...


10

You can use Queue to remove recursion from floodfill algorithm. Here are some basic ideas: Have a way to mark visited points At the beginning, queue the start point. While the queue is not empty, continue dequeuing its element. And with each element Fill its color and mark just-dequeued point as visited Enqueue unvisited adjacent points that has the same ...


9

A quick googling brings up the Wikipedia article on Flood Fill which includes pseudocode implementations which are not recursive. Below is some code that could help get you started, a basic queue implementation in C: typedef struct queue_ { struct queue_ *next; } queue_t; typedef struct ffnode_ { queue_t node; int x, y; } ffnode_t; /* returns the new head ...


8

The Wikipedia article is pretty good. As long as your grids are small, just about anything will work. Earlier this fall I did some flood filling on 10 megapixel scanned images. (The problem was to remove black edges from book pages that had been scanned on a photocopier.) In that case there are only two colors so I essentially treated the problem like a ...


8

You can have a complete image colored the actual way and when you fill a certain region with a color, it will replace all the regions that is specified by that color to be filled in. Layman's terms: User will click on the hand of the OUTLINE That click location will be checked with another image with perfectly color coded regions. Lets call it a MASK for ...


7

Isn't there a proof somewhere that all recursive functions can be implemented as an iterative function by using local data to mimic a stack? You could probably use std::vector to create stack-like behavior of the algorithm without blowing the stack since it will use the heap. EDIT: I noticed you are using C, so instead of std::vector, you could just ...


7

You do check the color of the pixel here: if (popped.color == oldColor) But popped.color may be (and apperently is in 50% of the cases) outdated. Because you do not check for duplicates when you insert pixel into your stack you will have duplicates. Upon popping these duplicates, the color attribute would have been saved a long time ago. Maybe it gets ...


7

You should use findContours to detect the biggest contour an after this draw founded contour with fill parameter -1 using method drawContours. Here's useful link: http://docs.opencv.org/doc/tutorials/imgproc/shapedescriptors/find_contours/find_contours.html


6

If it takes over a minute to flood-fill a 300×100 image, your implementation of getting and setting pixel values is probably extremely inefficient. If you draw your image into a bitmap context and then access (and modify) the pixel data directly, it should be a lot faster. The basic approach would be to allocate a memory buffer (a C array of 4 (rgba) × ...


6

With floodfill, which you already have: run along the BORDER of your matrix and floodfill it, i.e., change all zeroes (black) to 2 (filled black) and ones to 3 (filled white); ignore 2 and 3's that come from an earlier floodfill. For example with your matrix, you start from the upper left, and floodfill black a zone with area 11. Then you move right, and ...


6

Gareth Rees posted a very nice answer to this question that expands on David Eppstein's answer at Math Overflow citing multiple authors. In a sentence, the algorithm, which yields optimal solutions, is first to cut a maximum noncrossing set of lines between concave vertices (found in polynomial time by maximum independent set in a bipartite graph) and then ...


6

Here's some C++ code that does what you want. It uses a queue, and is more efficient about insertions into the queue. connectedRegion(const Point& source, RegionType& region, const Color target) { Color src_color = color_of(source, region); if (region.count(source) == 0 || src_color == target) return; std::queue<Point> ...


5

general reference optimized algorithm in C#


5

this algorithm worked good for me. private void FloodFill(Bitmap bmp, Point pt, int targetColor, int replacementColor) { Queue<Point> q = new LinkedList<Point>(); q.add(pt); while (q.size() > 0) { Point n = q.poll(); if (bmp.getPixel(n.x, n.y) != targetColor) continue; Point w = n, e = new ...


5

I guess you are talking about "flood fill". Some time ago, I wrote my own implementation of this based on the Wikipedia article. I represent the bitmap as a two-dimensional array of TRGBQuad pixels. function PMFloodFill(Pixmap: TASPixmap; const X0: integer; const Y0: integer; const Color: TColor): TASPixmap; var w, h: integer; MatchColor, QColor: ...


5

Using an Objective-C object to represent each and every pixel is going to be extremely slow and add little benefit. Use a different data structure to represent your bitmap, like one of the various CG* bitmap encapsulation mechanisms. Then twiddle the bits in the bitmap directly. It'll be tons and tons faster.


5

Its a recursive algorithm. You start at some start position in a 2D Grid [x,y], then look in all directions and fill them if you can. If (x,y) can't be filled, return. void floodFill( int x, int y ) { if ( btn( x, y ) isFillable ) { fillBtn(x,y); floodFill( x+1, y ); floodFill( x-1, y ); floodFill( x, y-1 ); floodFill( ...


5

Print row and col at the start of the fill routine to see what's wrong here. A little code reordering and you're fine :-)


5

It's a recursive algorithm, meaning that it calls itself to accomplish smaller parts of the whole process. Flood fill will start at one pixel. Then it will check the four adjacent pixels (up, down, left, right). For any of those four pixels that are the same colour as the one we started with, it will call another flood fill starting from that pixel. ...


5

Let me suggest a different way of looking at your problem. Going by the description of your game, it seems like the user's main, perhaps only, "verb" (in game design terms) is to draw a line that divides the open area of the field into two sections. If either of these two sections is free of enemies, that section gets filled in; if neither section is free ...


4

Looking at this picture It appears your problem would be represented well by a directed graph. Give each stop and each junction two nodes in the graph, one for each direction of the train. Dijkstra's algorithm works perfectly on directed graphs, so once you have the problem in that form, the rest is easy. So for example, in the picture above, starting ...


4

When those lines are uncommented, you call floodFill for both x - 1 and x + 1. Consider what happens when you call floodFill for x - 1. It also calls floodFill for x + 1 which is the x value that called floodFill. You have floodFill calling itself for the same two x values, the original x value, and the original x - 1. If you're going to use recursion, you ...


4

You are probably hitting Matlab's recursion limit. My computer doesn't crash, but generates this error: Maximum recursion limit of 500 reached. Use set(0,'RecursionLimit',N) to change the limit. Be aware that exceeding your available stack space can crash MATLAB and/or your computer. The way around this is to rewrite floodFill so it does not use ...


4

I've been looking around the internet to find a proper imfill function (as the one in Matlab) but working in C++ with OpenCV. After some reaserches, I finally came up with a solution : IplImage* imfill(IplImage* src) { CvScalar white = CV_RGB( 255, 255, 255 ); IplImage* dst = cvCreateImage( cvGetSize(src), 8, 3); CvMemStorage* storage = ...



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