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63

The range of double is much wider than the range of int or long. Consider this code: double d = 100000000000000000000d; long x = Math.Floor(d); // Invalid in reality The integer is outside the range of long - so what would you expect to happen? Typically you know that the value will actually be within the range of int or long, so you cast it: double d = ...


35

Obviously the outer floor is not redundant, since for example, sqrt(2) is not an integer, and thus floor(sqrt(2))≠sqrt(2). It is also easy to see that sqrt(floor(x))≠sqrt(x) for non-integer x. Since sqrt is a monotone function. We need to find out whether or not floor(sqrt(floor(x)))==floor(sqrt(x)) for all rationals (or reals). Let us prove that if ...


34

Wohoo, found it. Simple like everything in Joda once I traced down the calls. DateTime dt = new DateTime().hourOfDay().roundFloorCopy();


25

Normally we want to map a real value x in the (closed) interval [0,1] to an integer value j in the range [0 ...255]. And we want to do it in a "fair" way, so that, if the reals are uniformly distributed in the range, the discrete values will be approximately equiprobable: each of the 256 discrete values should get "the same share" (1/256) from the [0,1] ...


20

$seconds = time(); $rounded_seconds = round($seconds / (15 * 60)) * (15 * 60); echo "Original: " . date('H:i', $seconds) . "\n"; echo "Rounded: " . date('H:i', $rounded_seconds) . "\n"; This example gets the current time and rounds it to the nearest quarter and prints both the original and the rounded time. PS: If you want to round it down replace ...


20

Since you're looking for fourths (.00, .25, .50, .75), multiply your number by 4, round to nearest whole number as desired (floor if down, ceil if up), then divide by 4. 1.32, down to nearest fourth: 1.32 * 4 = 5.28 floor(5.28) = 5.00 5.00 / 4 = 1.25 Same principle applies for any other fractions, such as thirds or eighths (.0, .125, .25, .375, ...


19

Your full function would be something like this... function roundToQuarterHour($timestring) { $minutes = date('i', strtotime($timestring)); return $minutes - ($minutes % 15); }


17

The inner one is redundant, the outer one of course not. The outer one is not redundant, because the square root of a number x only results in an integer if x is a square number. The inner one is redundant, because the square root for any number in the interval [x,x+1[ (where x is an integer) always lies within the interval [floor(sqrt(x)),ceil(sqrt(x))[ ...


14

All integers can have exact floating point representation if your floating point type supports the required mantissa bits. Since double uses 53 bits for mantissa, it can store all 32-bit ints exactly. After all, you could just set the value as mantissa with zero exponent.


14

Math.random returns a floating-point number between 0 and 1. Returns a floating-point, pseudo-random number in the range [0, 1) that is, from 0 (inclusive) up to but not including 1 (exclusive), which you can then scale to your desired range. Multiplying this by n gives a floating point number between 0 (inclusive) and n (exclusive). Math.floor is ...


14

It’s not floor that is losing precision, but the conversion from Integer (an arbitrary-precision integer) to Double (a floating-point value, which has a limited precision). Accordingly, fromIntegral n :: Double is no longer the same value as n. Double has a 53-bit mantissa (52 explicitly stored, the leading one implicit), which is approximately equivalent ...


13

You can just use cast it to an integer. It will truncate it, which is equivalent to floor.


13

Because, according to the ECMAScript specifications, bitwise operators operators call ToInt32 on each expression to be evaluated. See 11.10 Binary Bitwise Operators: The production A : A @B, where @ is one of the bitwise operators in the productions above, is evaluated as follows: Evaluate A. Call GetValue(Result(1)). Evaluate B. Call ...


12

Generate a random number from 0 to 25 and add 75. :)


11

The range of double is way greater than the range of 32 or 64 bit integers, which is why std::floor returns a double. Casting to int should be fine so long as it's within the appropriate range - but be aware that a double can't represent all 64 bit integers exactly, so you may also end up with errors when you go beyond the point at which the accuracy of ...


11

After a night lost trying to solve this problem I believe I've found a rather simple solution, here it is: function bcceil($number) { if (strpos($number, '.') !== false) { if (preg_match("~\.[0]+$~", $number)) return bcround($number, 0); if ($number[0] != '-') return bcadd($number, 1, 0); return bcsub($number, 0, 0); } ...


10

So you want a really fast float->int conversion? AFAIK int->float conversion is fast, but on at least MSVC++ a float->int conversion invokes a small helper function, ftol(), which does some complicated stuff to ensure a standards compliant conversion is done. If you don't need such strict conversion, you can do some assembly hackery, assuming you're on an ...


10

$now = getdate(); $minutes = $now['minutes'] - $now['minutes']%15; //Can add this to go to the nearest 15min interval (up or down) $rmin = $now['minutes']%15; if ($rmin > 7){ $minutes = $now['minutes'] + (15-$rmin); }else{ $minutes = $now['minutes'] - $rmin; } $rounded = $now['hours'].":".$minutes; echo $rounded;


10

First off, I note that you should always use decimal for this task; never use double. If you are using double, stop what you are doing right now and fix your program so that you stop using a type designed for physics problems and start using a type designed for money problems to solve your money problem. Second, you are simply wrong when you say This ...


9

According to MSDN, Math.Floor(double) returns a double: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/e0b5f0xb.aspx If you want it as an int: int result = (int)Math.Floor(yourVariable); I can see how the MSDN article can be misleading, they should have specified that while the result is an "integer" (in this case meaning whole number) it is still of TYPE ...


9

a/b does integer division. If either a or b is negative, the result depends on the compiler (rounding can go toward zero or toward negative infinity in pre-C99; in C99+, the rounding goes toward 0). The result has type int. floor(a/b) does the same division, converts the result to double, discards the (nonexistent) fractional part, and returns the result as ...


8

Breaking Math.floor(Math.Random() * num) down into it's individual pieces and explaining each piece, you get this: Math.random() gives you a random decimal number between 0 and 1, including 0, but not including 1. So, it might give you something like 0.38548569372. Math.random() * num gives you a random decimal number between 0 and num, including 0, but ...


8

26100 is not the same as 21600


8

You might want to give a try to FastMath. Here is a post about the performance of Math in Java vs. Javascript. There are a few good hints about why the default math lib is slow. They are discussing other operations than floor, but I guess their findings can be generalized. I found it interesting. EDIT According to this bug entry, floor has been ...


8

The first question is perhaps not so important, so I'll try to answer the second question first. Once you have a number, if you know that it came from floor x, you can't know whether x was the valid representation of 2^1024 or if it was infinity. You can probably assume anything outside of the range of double is invalid and was produced from infinity, ...


7

static_cast <int> (std::floor(x)); does pretty much what you want, yes. It gives you the nearest integer, rounded towards -infinity. At least as long as your input is in the range representable by ints. I'm not sure what you mean by 'adding .5 and whatnot, but it won't have the same effect And std::floor returns a double because that's the most ...


7

You possibly have run in to the infamous -lm problem: Compile as: gcc yourfile.c -o out -lm This is C FAQ 14.3 item as well.


7

Math.Round(3.7,MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero); http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.midpointrounding.aspx In the above, I made use of AwayFromZero for rounding because the default is Banker's rounding, so if the fraction is 0.5, it is rounded to nearest even. So 3.5 becomes 4 (nearest even), but 2.5 becomes 2 (nearest even). So you choose a ...


7

The problem is that you're trying to use Integer as the input. Haskell is strongly typed, which means there are no implicit coercions or conversions of any kind. Look at signatures of functions you're trying to compose: sqrt :: Floating a => a -> a floor :: (RealFrac a, Integral b) => a -> b And at the signature of your function inferred by ...


7

$a = 19; $a -= $a % 18; // => 18



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