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14

It's not floor that rounds, it's floating point math that does. This line: echo 0.99999999999999999; Prints 1 (demo) because 0.99999999999999999 is too precise to be represented by a (64-bit?) float, so the closest possible value is taken, which happens to be 1. 0.99999999999999994 is also too precise to be represented exactly, but here the closest ...


6

math.ceil(50/100) is the same as math.ceil(0), since 50/100 is 0 (since integer division is performed here, and the result is therefore an integer). math.ceil(50.0/100.0) would give you 1, since 50.0/100.0 will be computed with floating point division and result in 0.5.


5

FloatMath utility class is deprecated. Use Math.floor instead.


5

The functions give different results with negative fractions. echo floor(-0.1); // -1 echo intval(-0.1); // 0


4

This is always true, ignoring floating point issues: b*(a // b) + a % b == a This is also always true: ((b > 0) == (a % b > 0)) or (a % b == 0) Finally, abs(a % b) < abs(b) To provide this behavior, integer division rounds towards negative infinity, rather than towards zero.


4

You will spot a difference when using floats: >>> 1000.5//1 1000.0 >>> floor(1000.5) 1000 floor returns an integer. For most cases 1000 and 1000.0 are equivalent, but not always.


4

JavaScript's Math.floor function already exists in Ruby: 1.9.floor What you are doing in your code is actually something else, which also exists: 1.9.truncate They are the same for positive numbers, but for negative numbers truncate behaves like ceil: floor rounds down ceil rounds up truncate rounds towards zero


4

log(243,3) simply doesn't give you exactly 5: >>> '%.60f' % log(243,3) '4.999999999999999111821580299874767661094665527343750000000000' As the docs say, log(x, base) is "calculated as log(x)/log(base)". And neither log(243) nor log(3) can be represented exactly, and you get rounding errors. Sometimes you're lucky, sometimes you're not. Don't ...


4

That intrinsic exists as _mm256_floor_pd


3

When you want to compare float numbers, use math.isclose(). When you want to convert a float number that is close to an integer, use round(). Float numbers are too subject to error for "conventional" methods to be used. Their precision (and the precision of functions like log) is too limited, unfortunately. What looks like a 5 may not be an exact 5. And ...


3

A better way would be to use Mod, like Piecewise((0, Eq(Mod(n, 2), 0)), (1, Eq(Mod(n, 2), 1))) However, since your function coincides exactly with the definition of Mod, you can just use it directly Mod(n, 2) or equivalently n % 2


3

This functionality is indeed not available. The reason is that Java apparently doesn't offer methods that support it. What you can do is to convert the (floored) double to a String and converting that to an Integer. Here is an example: frege> import Prelude.Math(floor) frege> integerFromDouble d = String.aton ("%.0f".format (floor d)) function ...


3

FloatMath and getScale() both are deprecated. use the following code instead double exactContentHeight = Math.floor(mRefreshableView.getContentHeight() * getResources().getDisplayMetrics().density);


3

That behaviour is caused by limited precision of floating point numbers. The last case is of type float (check it with var_dump), and the Manual says: Warning Floating point numbers have limited precision. Although it depends on the system, PHP typically uses the IEEE 754 double precision format, which will give a maximum relative error due to ...


3

math.floor(N) returns an int, and N // 1 returns a float. >>> type(math.floor(-4.4)) <class 'int'> >>> type((-4.4) // 1) <class 'float'> Because of this floor(nan) will raise ValueError while nan // 1 returns NaN (similar for ┬▒inf.) >>> math.floor(math.nan) Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", ...


3

This is a result of floating point precision in PHP, in your example: gettype($val1); returns integer and gettype($val2); returns double Combine that with this warning on php.net: Additionally, rational numbers that are exactly representable as floating point numbers in base 10, like 0.1 or 0.7, do not have an exact representation as floating ...


3

Assuming the result of ceil fits in the range of int (or whatever the casted type may be), the cast is safe. Rounding errors only come into play when the number in question can't be expressed exactly in binary. For example, 0.5 can be expressed exactly as a binary number, but 0.1 cannot. Since the result of ceil is a integer, it can be expressed exactly ...


3

A 64-bit double represents integers of up to 2 in power 53 exactly. Integers larger than that do not have any fractional part when represented as double. In other words, you can safely cast the result of ceil or floor to an integer, as long as that integer can hold the value.


3

float and double have both a positive 0 and a negative 0. When you multiple 0 * -1 you get -0 as specified in the IEEE 754 standard. Note: 1/0 is positive infinity but 1/-0 is negative infinity. You can see that http://ideone.com/tBd41l System.out.println(0f * -1); prints -0.0 Math.floor is not required.


2

Take the absolute value, divide it, multiply it by -1. Weird bug.


2

The issue that you're dealing with has to do the nature of IEEE 754 floating point numbers - the type used to hold Number in JavaScript, double in Java and C, etc. These numbers are stored in a sort of scientific notation, in the form of [+/-] 1.[some value] * 2^[some other value]. This results in you getting about 15 significant decimal digits that are ...


2

In Python % works: #!/usr/bin/python x = 278.791 y = x - (x % 1) print x, y In C other methods must be used: #include <stdio.h> #include <math.h> int main() { float x = 278.791; float y = fmod(x,1.0); printf("%f, %f\n", x, y); x = 278.791; y = x - (int)x; printf("%f, %f\n", x, y); }


2

You should be able to use the constant, PHP_ROUND_HALF_DOWN, to have the round function round down when it is half way. echo round(7.1, 0, PHP_ROUND_HALF_DOWN) . "\n"; echo round(7.5, 0, PHP_ROUND_HALF_DOWN) . "\n"; echo round(7.8, 0, PHP_ROUND_HALF_DOWN) . "\n"; Output: 7 7 8 From the manual: Round val down to precision decimal places towards ...


2

It is part of PHP weird precissions. It's normal depending on the machine. Floating point numbers have limited precision. Although it depends on the system, PHP typically uses the IEEE 754 double precision format, which will give a maximum relative error due to rounding in the order of 1.11e-16. Non elementary arithmetic operations may give ...


2

result = 0 will assign its value to 0. You want == instead.


2

math.floor first tries to use the __floor__ magic method, if it does not exist it instead uses __float__ and then floors that, so it will work when the object supports __floor__ or can be cast to a float. x//1 uses the __floordiv__ magic method and if that is not defined or returns NotImelemeted it then tries __rfloordiv__ on the integer 1 which will ...


2

Floor division works in Python the way it's mathematically defined. x // y == math.floor(x/y) In other words x // y is the largest integer less than or equal to x / y


2

Per the docs, The return value of floor() is still of type float because the value range of float is usually bigger than that of integer. Intval() returns an int, however.


2

Might not the cleanest solution, but should do the trick: select (CEILING(5.456 / 0.5) * 0.5) CEILING is returning the higher value as shown in documentation.


2

floor() value rounded to the next lowest integer. The return value of floor() is still of type float because the value range of float is usually bigger than that of integer. This function returns FALSE in case of an error (e.g. passing an array). <?php echo floor(4.3); // 4 echo floor(9.999); // 9 echo floor(-3.14); // -4 ?>



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