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25

Normally we want to map a real value x in the (closed) interval [0,1] to an integer value j in the range [0 ...255]. And we want to do it in a "fair" way, so that, if the reals are uniformly distributed in the range, the discrete values will be approximately equiprobable: each of the 256 discrete values should get "the same share" (1/256) from the [0,1] ...


14

It’s not floor that is losing precision, but the conversion from Integer (an arbitrary-precision integer) to Double (a floating-point value, which has a limited precision). Accordingly, fromIntegral n :: Double is no longer the same value as n. Double has a 53-bit mantissa (52 explicitly stored, the leading one implicit), which is approximately equivalent ...


8

The first question is perhaps not so important, so I'll try to answer the second question first. Once you have a number, if you know that it came from floor x, you can't know whether x was the valid representation of 2^1024 or if it was infinity. You can probably assume anything outside of the range of double is invalid and was produced from infinity, ...


7

In general, I'd say (int)(blabla * 255.99999999999997) is more correct than using round(). Why? Because with round(), 0 and 255 only have "half" the range that 1-254 do. If you round(), then 0-0.00196078431 get mapped to 0, while 0.00196078431-0.00588235293 get mapped to 1. This means that 1 has 200% more probability of occurring than 0, which is, strictly ...


5

The Math.floor method just delegates the call to the StrictMath.floor method (see here). This method is a native method. After this method the cast does not have to do anything because it is already a number that is equal to an integer (so no decimal places). Maybe the native implementation of floor is faster than the cast of a double value to an int ...


5

Casting to int has the same effect as the floor function (i.e. it truncates). When you call round it, well, rounds to the nearest integer. They do different things, so choose the one you need.


5

When you get up into huge numbers, the doubles are spaced more widely than integers. When you do a division in this range, the result can be rounded up or down. So in your fourth test case, the result of the division d/1630 is actually rounded up to the nearest available double. Since this is a whole number, the call to floor does not change it. ...


4

Try: printf "%.18g\n", my $a=(($x1-$x0)/$dx); What you see as 15 isn't exactly 15; it may be a little less or a little more. Most floating point numbers can only be represented imprecisely; when used in operations, the effect is, err, multiplied. Classic reference: http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E19957-01/806-3568/ncg_goldberg.html The workaround with ...


4

int() removes the decimal component; it doesn't do any rounding. From the documentation: If x is floating point, the conversion truncates towards zero. For turning a float into an int this is entirely logical behaviour. This is not division, flooring or otherwise. The // floor division operator otherwise clearly does floor, not truncate. In Python 2, ...


4

Works fine for me: ghci > floor 1.7 1 ghci > :t floor floor :: (Integral b, RealFrac a) => a -> b You can force it to be of Int type by explicitly mentioning the type: ghci > floor 1.7 :: Int 1 Or if you want Integer then, ghci > floor 1.7 :: Integer 1


3

Good-ol' vectorization at it's finest here. Since we don't have any factor or character columns, we can treat dat as a matrix and replace the values directly. ## dat <- read.table(h=T, text = 'col1 col2 col3 col4 ## 0 0.2 0.8 1 ## 0.2 0 0.7 2.1 ## 13.2 12.1 1.58 0') > min <- 0.3 > dat[dat < min] <- min ...


3

This answer is based on the assumption that R's floating point numbers are being represented by IEEE 754 64-bit binary numbers. That is consistent with the reported results, and inherently very likely. Doing much arithmetic on numbers with absolute magnitude below about 2e-308 is very problematic. Below that point, precision drops with magnitude. The ...


3

Look to the rounding of parts of your expression. The division of 5/9 is $a / $b = 5 / 9 = 0.555555556 so see http://php.net/manual/en/function.floor.php floor(1.5) = 1 floor(-1.5) = -2 then floor(floor($a / $b) - .5) = floor(floor(0.555555556)) = floor(0 - .5) = floor(-.5) = -1 and the second case see http://www.php.net/intval (int) 4.32 = 4 ...


3

This may be the easiest, if by "rounding down" you mean "toward minus infinity" (as floor() does): >>> x = 1.2876 >>> x - x % .001 1.287 >>> x = -1.1111 >>> x - x % .001 -1.112 This is prone to lots of shallow surprises, though, due to that most decimal values cannot be exactly represented as binary floating-point ...


3

As commented by @user2357112 #cython: cdivision=True contradicts from __future__ import division. This code is illustrative: #cython: wraparound=False #cython: boundscheck=False #cython: nonecheck=False #cython: profile=False from __future__ import division def main(): cdef double i, j i = 0 j = 2 print 1/j print 1/i print 1/2 ...


3

NOTE: I think you are looking for the operation called fmod in other languages and % in Java. The e - d that you wish to compute could be computed allways of the correct sign and always lower than 1630 as -(d % 1630.0). all 4 cases should be NON-positive For an arbitrary double d, it is likely that Math.floor(d/1630)*1630 would be less than d, but ...


3

java.lang.Math is just a port of what the C math library does. For C, I think it comes down to the fact that CPU have special instructions to do Math.pow for floating point numbers (but not for integers). Of course, the language could still add an int implementation. BigInteger has one, in fact. It makes sense there, too, because pow tends to result in ...


2

In double-precision, the value of $dx is exactly 33.33333333333333570180911920033395290374755859375 The value of ($x1-$x0)/$dx is exactly 14.9999999999999982236431605997495353221893310546875 floor($x1-$x0)/$dx is thus 14. You get 15 from the print/sprintf because printing rounds the decimal value (unless you ask for more digits, like "%.17g").


2

Another approach, building on the decimal module's more elaborate facilities. Like the builtin round(), this also supports negative "digits": >>> round(1234.5, -1) # builtin behavior for negative `ndigits` 1230.0 >>> round(1234.5, -2) 1200.0 >>> round(1234.5, -3) 1000.0 and you can use any of the 8(!) rounding modes defined in ...


2

This is just something that appeared in my mind. Why don't we convert it to string, and then floor it? import math def floor_float(x, index): sx = str(x) sx = sx[:index]+str(math.floor(float(sx[index]+"."+sx[index+1]))) return float(sx) A little advantage is that it's more representating-error-proof, it's more accurate in representating the ...


2

There's always floor(x*10**3)*10**-3.


2

Let's break down what happens when you do ceil(a/b). First, an integer division happens between a and b, so 63/62 becomes 1, and then 1 is casted to double to become 1.0, and then ceil(1.0) is of course just 1.0. If you expect to get 2, you need to convert to double before the division occurs, i.e. ceil(double(a) / double(b)) uses double division.


2

To round nearest quarter hour use below code <?php $time = strtotime("01:08"); echo $time.'<br />'; $round = 15*60; $rounded = round($time / $round) * $round; echo date("H:i", $rounded); ?> 01:08 become 01:15


2

If think you don't need Math.Floor to determine a minimum : Returns the largest integer less than or equal to the specified double-precision floating-point number. If you need to determine the minimum of both numbers, use Math.Min instead Console.WriteLine("\nThe minimum number between {0} and {1} is {2}.\n", d_input3, d_input3a, Math.Min(d_input3, ...


2

Try something like this: foreach( $numberofballs as $x){ $first = floor($x / 6); $last = $x - ($first * 6); if($last==0 && $first>0) {$last=6; $first-=1;} echo $first.'.'.$last; }


2

powf(10.0f, floorf(log10f(value)))


1

You can use lapply to do this dat[] <- lapply(dat, function(x) ifelse(x<0.3, 0.3, x)) > dat col1 col2 col3 col4 1 0.3 0.3 0.80 1.0 2 0.3 0.3 0.70 2.1 3 13.2 12.1 1.58 0.3 By using dat[] instead of only dat you can keep the class and structure of the existing data.frame. Otherwise, dat would be a list, since lapply returns a list. In ...


1

I'm sure there's a much simpler way that doesn't try to work forward from first principles, but how about: float inputValue = getInputValue(); float log10 = floorf(log10f(inputValue)); float modulo = powf(10.0f, log10); inputValue -= fmodf(inputValue, modulo); EDIT: actually, I think I've assumed you'd want 230 to round to 200, 0.73 to round to 0.7, etc, ...


1

You're only running Math.random once, when you initialize the value of this.attackpoints. You could do this instead: this.getAttackPoints = function() { return Math.floor((Math.random()*10)+5); } this.attack=function(opponent) { opponent.hitpoints-=this.getAttackPoints(); console.log(this.name + " has " + this.hitpoints + " hitpoints and " + ...


1

CEIL and FLOOR only remove decimals - specifically rounding to integer value. If you want it rounded to (above/below) multiple of 10,000, you have to do it a bit more complicatedly: S1CovA_ceil = ceil(s1covA/10000)*10000; And the same for floor. Basically you have to divide it by the desired rounding level, round the rest with ceil/floor, and then ...



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