Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

If you want to "fold with state", probably Traversable is the abstraction you're looking for. One of the methods defined in Traversable class is traverse :: Applicative f => (a -> f b) -> t a -> f (t b) Basically, traverse takes a "stateful function" of type a -> f b and applies it to every function in the container t a, resulting in a ...


0

If you're really determined to use a right fold for this, you can combine calculating length xs with the calculation like this (taking the liberty of defining fromDigits [] = 0): fromDigits xn = let (x, _) = fromDigits' xn in x where fromDigits' [] = (0, 0) fromDigits' (x:xn) = (toInteger x * 10 ^ l + y, l + 1) where (y, l) = fromDigits' xn ...


1

A better way to solve this is to build up a list of your powers of 10. This is quite simple using iterate: powersOf :: Num a => a -> [a] powersOf n = iterate (*n) 1 Then you just need to multiply these powers of 10 by their respective values in the list of digits. This is easily accomplished with zipWith (*), but you have to make sure it's in the ...


0

Such a simple function can carry all its state in its bare arguments. Carry around an accumulator argument, and the operation becomes trivial. fromDigits :: [Int] -> Integer fromDigits xs = fromDigitsA xs 0 # 0 is the current accumulator value fromDigitsA [] acc = acc fromDigitsA (x:xs) acc = fromDigitsA xs (acc * 10 + toInteger x)


3

You should avoid the use of length and write your function using foldl (or foldl'): fromDigits :: [Int] -> Integer fromDigits ds = foldl (\s d -> s*10 + (fromIntegral d)) 0 ds From this a generalization to any Foldable should be clear.


4

First, folding is already about carrying some state around. Foldable is precisely what you're looking for, there is no need for State or other monads. Second, it'd be more natural to have the base case defined on empty lists and then the case for non-empty lists. The way it is now, the function is undefined on empty lists (while it'd be perfectly valid). ...


6

You are folding over a seq. Parallel fold only happens on persistent vectors and maps right now. There are also all sorts of reasons why this kind of perf testing is inferior to using something like Criterium, but that's probably a separate discussion. (Some of the reasons are garbage collection, JVM warmup and inlining, funky default jvm settings on both ...


6

Here's one solution mapEvery :: Int -> (a -> a) -> [a] -> [a] mapEvery n f as = foldr go (const []) as 1 where go a as m | m == n = f a : as 1 | otherwise = a : as (m+1) This uses the "foldl as foldr" trick to pass state from the left to the right along the list as you fold. Essentially, if we read the type of foldr as (a -> ...


1

Yes, it can: mapEvery :: Int -> (a -> a) -> [a] -> [a] mapEvery n f xs = foldr (\y ys -> g y : ys) [] $ zip [1..] xs where g (i, y) = if i `mod` n == 0 then f y else y And since it's possible to implement zip in terms of foldr, you could get even more fold-y if you really wanted. This even works on infinite lists: > ...


3

One tiny important detail not mentioned in other answers is that GHC, given a function definition like f x y z w q = ... cannot inline f until all of the arguments x, y, z, w, and q are applied. This means that it's often advantageous to use the worker/wrapper transformation to expose a minimal set of function arguments which must be applied before ...


19

I can add some important details about GHC's optimization system. The naive definition of foldr passes around a function. There's an inherent overhead in calling a function - especially when the function isn't known at compile time. It'd be really nice to able to inline the definition of the function if it's known at compile time. There are tricks ...


10

GHC cannot inline recursive functions, so foldr :: (a -> b -> b) -> b -> [a] -> b foldr _ z [] = z foldr f z (x:xs) = f x (foldr f z xs) cannot be inlined. But foldr k z = go where go [] = z go (y:ys) = y `k` go ys is not a recursive function. It is a non-recursive function with a local ...


11

As the comments say: -- Inline only in the final stage, after the foldr/cons rule has had a chance -- Also note that we inline it when it has *two* parameters, which are the -- ones we are keen about specialising! In particular, note the "we inline it when it has two parameters, which are the ones we are keen about specialising!" What this is saying is ...


0

Here's a custom fold function to fold as you asked. Copy to .vimrc and enjoy! :) Using this function, fold text on comments beginning with /** will display the text on the second line of the comment with the indent and * removed. You'll end up with something like: (5 lines) Description. Regular C style /* comments have a similar display but with the first ...


1

You can influence what gets displayed in the closed fold via the 'foldtext' option. Maybe someone already has written such; else, you have to write a Vim function that also considers the next (folded) lines, and extracts the text you want to see.


1

function that you should pass to a tree_fold accepts three arguments, and you're passing a function that can take only two arguments. That's what compiler tries to say. Of course, ther're some other problems, but I hope tha you'll cope with them!


0

Most operators in a lispy language will have a partner that you can use to define it or vice versa. This attribute is called "metacircularity". There is no one specific set of basic operators that is the fundamental minimum to allow the full set of programmability given by the language. You can read more at this paper: ...


0

Folds are a unifying framework for data processing in principled way, because they correspond to inductive data definitions. They are not ad-hoc. cons/car/cdr are building blocks for creating data (and code) but in unprincipled way (we can do anything, and process it ad-hoc). Folds are higher level, more disciplined, more predictable, easier to reason about. ...


6

I thought Rich Hickey explained exactly that in his talk about transducers. He sees folds as a fundamental concept of transformation. It doesn't need to know what structure it is working on and how to operate on that structure. You just defined fold in terms of itself, cdr, car and rest. What Rich is arguing for is that fold in itself is an abstract ...


0

map is a primitive used to create mapcat. You can use mapcat to create map which is reducing mapcat back to the map it was built from. You can build an infinite amount of higher order functions using both.


3

For a direct approach, you can just define the equivalents of Control.Arrow's (***) and (&&&) explicitly, for each N (e.g. N == 4): prod4 (f1,f2,f3,f4) (x1,x2,x3,x4) = (f1 x1,f2 x2,f3 x3,f4 x4) -- cf (***) call4 (f1,f2,f3,f4) x = (f1 x, f2 x, f3 x, f4 x ) -- cf (&&&) ap4 f (x1,x2,x3,x4) = f x1 x2 ...


9

If I understand your examples right, the types are ai -> b -> ai, not ai -> b -> a as you first wrote. Let's rewrite the types to a -> ri -> ri, just because it helps me think. First thing to observe is this correspondence: (a -> r1 -> r1, ..., a -> rn -> rn) ~ a -> (r1 -> r1, ..., rn -> rn) This allows you to ...


9

Every foldl is a foldr. Let's remember the definitions. foldr :: (a -> s -> s) -> s -> [a] -> s foldr f s [] = s foldr f s (a : as) = f a (foldr f s as) That's the standard issue one-step iterator for lists. I used to get my students to bang on the tables and chant "What do you do with the empty list? What do you do with a : as"? And ...


1

A slight but significant generalization of several of these answers is that you can implement foldl with foldr, which I think is a clearer way of explaining what's going on in them: myMap :: (a -> b) -> [a] -> [b] myMap f = foldr step [] where step a bs = f a : bs -- To fold from the left, we: -- -- 1. Map each list element to an ...


4

This is what foldl op acc does with a list with, say, 6 elements: (((((acc `op` x1) `op` x2) `op` x3) `op` x4) `op` x5 ) `op` x6 while foldr op acc does this: x1 `op` (x2 `op` (x3 `op` (x4 `op` (x5 `op` (x6 `op` acc))))) When you look at this, it becomes clear that if you want foldl to reverse the list, op should be a "stick the right operand to the ...


6

You can use foldr to reverse a list efficiently (well, most of the time in GHC 7.9—it relies on some compiler optimizations), but it's a little weird: reverse xs = foldr (\x k -> \acc -> k (x:acc)) id xs [] I wrote an explanation of how this works on the Haskell Wiki.


4

foldr basically deconstructs a list, in the canonical way: foldr f initial is the same as a function with patterns:(this is basically the definition of foldr) ff [] = initial ff (x:xs) = f x $ ff xs i.e. it un-conses the elements one by one and feeds them to f. Well, if all f does is cons them back again, then you get the list you originally had! ...


8

For a start, the type signatures don't line up: foldl :: (o -> i -> o) -> o -> [i] -> o foldr :: (i -> o -> o) -> o -> [i] -> o So if you swap your argument names: reverse' xs = foldr (\ x acc -> x : acc) [] xs Now it compiles. It won't work, but it compiles now. The thing is, foldl, works from left to right (i.e., ...



Top 50 recent answers are included