Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

OK, so let's try this: step x acc = if isSpace x then if null (fst acc) then acc else ([], (fst acc) : (snd acc)) else (x : fst acc, snd acc) words' xs = snd $ foldr step ([], []) xs Now let's walk this through, one step at a time: Suppose we want words' "ABC DEF GHI". We can do it like this: Prelude> step 'I' ([], []) ...


4

delete is a modal search. It has two different modes of operation - whether it's already found the result or not. You can use foldr to construct a function that passes the state down the line as each element is checked. So in the case of delete, the state can be a simple Bool. It's not exactly the best type, but it will do. Once you have identified the ...


5

delete doesn't operate on the entire list evenly. The structure of the computation isn't just considering the whole list one element at a time. It differs after it hits the element it's looking for. This tells you it can't be implemented as just a foldr. There will have to be some sort of post-processing involved. When that happens, the general pattern ...


5

Scalaz has various ops e.g. suml, assuming there's a Foldable typeclass instance for Stream.


0

As Thumbnail points out, reduce-right cannot be efficiently implemented on the jvm for sequences. But as it turns out, we do have a family of data types that can do efficient lookup and truncation from the right side. reduce-right can be implemented for vectors. user> (defn reduce-right [f init vec] (loop [acc init v vec] (if (empty? v) ...


4

Clojure implements a left fold called reduce. Why no right fold? reduce and many other functions work on sequences, which are accessible from the left but not the right. The new reducers and transducers are designed to work with associative functions on data structures of varying accessibility.


1

By "fold" you probably mean "fold left", which is another name for "reduce". The Java Stream interface defines reduce, so I suggest inspecting that signature: T reduce(T identity, BinaryOperator<T> accumulator)


4

A couple of notes: First note that you want get 1 to return the first element in your list, that's not the common choice in many languages including Haskell ([2, 3, 5] !! 1 = 3). Second, although elementAt is a recursive function over lists, it can be defined more efficiently in the old fashion recursive way. fold functions are not good choices here, ...


2

I can see the following, a bit cryptic way of using foldl for your purpose (it is using zero-based indexing, but can be changed easily to 1-based): get i lst= snd $ foldl (\p (j, y) -> if j == i then (j,y) else p ) (0, 0) (zip [0,1..] lst) The foldl part is working with tuples (index, element), whose list is generated by zipping the given ...


2

The original blog post about reducers (Reducers - A Library and Model for Collection Processing) introduces the fold function under the section Simplicity is Opportunity. The primary signature of fold takes a combining function, a reducing function, and a collection and returns the result of combining the results of reducing subsegments of the ...


8

Yes, reducers do solve this problem, because they have slightly different semantics from the type of fold that Guy Steele is referring to (although the effect can be very similar in practice). foldr and foldl take a single function argument, which is applied to each member of a collection (along with an accumulator value) in turn. As Steele says, they are ...


0

@Daniel's reply is probably the proper way to go to solve the overall problem. Regarding the specific q. when you do an if in the fold you need also to supply the else in your case that would be preserving x with it's current count


3

What you are trying will not work. If you only have a distance(a, b) function, it is really inefficient and complicated to solve the problem. You would need to use RDD.cartesian to generate all the possible (word1, word2) pairs. Then filter out those with too great a distance. Now you have the similar word pairs. Let's say they are (fox, fix), (fix, six), ...


1

Doesn't it indeed make more sense for reduceRight to be implemented the way I did? Maybe. However, the JavaScript array iterators do not come from a pure functional programming background. Why is the native reduceRight not implemented the way I did? Because it's simpler (easier to remember) to have the same parameter order, the accumulator always ...


5

Until C++17 and fold expressions come along, the simplest implementation of all_of is probably along the lines of: // base case; actually only used for empty pack template<bool... values> struct all_of : std::true_type {}; // if first is true, check the rest template<bool... values> struct all_of<true, values...> : all_of<values...> ...


3

What you should be testing in your exit branch is the value of self.current; instead, you're testing the value of self.next. In other words, you're failing to output the last number in the sequence (as Matthieu suggested). I verified that if the iterator is implemented correctly, it should produce the correct result with this (using grabbag_macros = ...


0

You can check wiki, In k-fold cross-validation, the original sample is randomly partitioned into k equal size subsamples. and The k results from the folds can then be averaged (or otherwise combined) to produce a single estimation. So no worries about different error rates of randomly selecting folds. Of course the results will be different. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included