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7

You can use slicing for assignment : for i in content: s=i.split() name,scores=s[0],s[1:] At the end you'll have the name in name variable and list of scores in scores. In python 3 you can use star expressions : for i in content: name,*scores=i.split()


4

Python has built-in funcion max, it's considered a good practice to use it. Max in year: max(temp_dict["2010"]) Max all time: max(sum(temp_dict.values(), [])) sum(lists, []) does list flattening, equal to [] + lists[0] + lists[1]...


4

What you are looking for is the sub2ind function. Here's how you would improve your matrix creations: >> indx = sub2ind(size(A),[1 3 1 3]',j(:)) indx = 1 3 4 9 >> A(indx)=x(:) A = 1 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 4 Note that you would have to tweak your i definition a little bit so i and j have the same number of elements.


3

One vectorized approach with bsxfun - A(bsxfun(@plus,ii(:),(jj-1)*size(A,1))) = x You need the expansion with bsxfun as the number of row indices don't match up with the number of column indices. Also, please note that I have replaced the variable names i with ii and j with jj as i and j are also used with complex numbers, as that might cause some ...


3

You probably intended for i in range(len(tagFinder)): content = content.replace(tagFinder[i],safeTag[i]) .......... return content instead of for i in content: return content.replace(tagFinder[i],safeTag[i]) and also you are prematurely exiting the loop because of the return statement. The return statement should be the last statement in your ...


3

The for..of loop only supports iterable objects like arrays, not objects. To iterate over the values of an object, use: for (var key in test) { var item = test[key]; }


3

The difference is that i++ returns the value of i before incrementing and ++i the value of i after incrementing. There is no difference if you ignore the return value, e.g. in: for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) { } The habit of using ++i over i++ comes from C, where people were worried that storing the old value for i in i++ would incur a performance ...


2

Way back in the day (we're talking IE6/7 here!), I recall benchmarking both forms and found that there was a small performance improvement with ++i instead of i++. My (unproven) theory was that a non-optimizing JS engine had to do a tiny bit more work in the i++ case: it had to save the previous value in case it would be used - and being a non-optimizing ...


2

You can use Extended Iterable Unpacking content = ['this 3 5 2', 'that 3 5'] for i in content: name, *score = i.split() print(name, score) This is Python 3.x compatible only. For Python 2.x, content = ['this 3 5 2', 'that 3 5'] for i in content: splitted_content = i.split() name, dynamic_score = splitted_content[0], ...


2

Your code is working, be sure to add your script inside $(document).ready() or add the script after the DOM elements targeted. $(document).ready(function() { function roomGen(minimum, maximum, interv) { for (var i = minimum; i < maximum; i += interv) { room = "#room" + i; $(room).addClass('currentRoom'); console.log(room); } } ...


1

Here's another way, making use of sparse: A = full(sparse(repmat(ii,size(jj,1),1).', jj ,x)); I'm using ii and jj as variable names instead of i and j, as in Divakar's answer.


1

Here's an example of using a dict to build a dataframe: dict_for_df = {} for i in ('a','b','c','d'): # Don't use "id" as a counter; it's a python function x = random.random() # first value y = random.random() # second value dict_for_df[i] = [x,y] # store in a dict df = pd.DataFrame(dict_for_df) # after the loop convert the ...


1

The code has 43 opening brackets and 42 closing brackets, so if you're executing it as a script, you can't expect that to run correctly. I don't know for sure where your missing bracket should be, because it depends on what you want to do, but you should take a closer look and attempt to find it. Take a look at your recent changes, have you forgotten to ...


1

I have fixed it. I suggest you to be careful with the size of spalte as @PM 2Ring has commented. The problem you have is on your decrypt. Its behavour is the same as crypt. You have to append the values to the output on the place that you have crypt them: def decrypt(text,spalte): laenge=len(text) output= laenge*[''] j=0 for x in ...


1

The answer taking "Is it always better to avoid such top-level variables?" literal is of course "No, it depends", but a useful remark is that declaring global variables as constant const N = 10000000 makes case 2 as fast as case 3.


1

Use: for id, name in d: print id, ' '.join(name) The way this works is that ' '.join(['first', 'last']) Joins all elements in the list with an empty space as its separator. This would also work if you wanted to create a CSV file in which case you would use a comma as the separator. For example: ','.join(['first', 'second', 'third']) If you want ...


1

I went through your code and there is indeed a missing bracket. Assuming that the indentation of your code is correct and that you only want to write the summary one time, this is where I think the problem is. Note that I already added the closing bracket on the line where I put my comment: for (i in 1:length(files)){ # !! I believe you forgot to close this ...


1

There is a difference, however not when used in a for loop. In an expression, i++ evaluates to the previous value of i, and then i is incremented. ++i increments first, and evaluates then. For this reason, some programmers prefer to write ++i in their for-loops — either because they're used to it, or because they feel it is "more right" somehow. edit: ...



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