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5

Use lists[29], you're exceeding the bounds of the array. Remember indexes are 0-based, not 1-based. By default C++ does not have bounds-checking on arrays, so this: int array[100]; array[100] = 1; Is the same as: int* array = calloc( 100, 4 ); *(array + 100) = 1; ...which is +1 element outside the bounds of the array in memory. You're writing into in ...


2

Thank you guys, this is the solution. ${"variable" . $x} hope you guys have a good day :)


2

Yes it is called a foreach loop $variables[0] = 'hello'; $variables[1] = 'goodnight'; foreach($variables as $variable){ echo $variable; }


2

Most of the time in R, if you're being drawn to using a for loop (let alone nested for loops), you're probably on the wrong track. The general approach to solving your problem is to use the expand.grid function to create all combinations of the inputs, then use mapply to repeatedly regress on each combination of inputs and return a list of results, then ...


2

Valid indexes into int lists[30] are 0 through 29. But you're accessing 30. Since that's undefined behavior, all kinds of weird things could happen. Possibly what's happening in your case is that some other action (such as subsequent calls to cout) is using that memory location. So by the time your loop is running, that value is no longer 30.


2

I guess your problem is because: your Optionals are not unwrapped properly type Int has no "reduce" member you're declaring var sum inside the loop, so its value is replaced at each iteration Maybe use something like this instead: var sum = 0 for order in myOrders { if let data = order as? NSManagedObject { if let price = ...


2

#include <stdio.h> #define HEIGHT 6 #define WIDTH 5 enum contents { Empty, Full, Half }; void init(int board[][WIDTH]) { int row,column; for(row=0;row<HEIGHT; row++) for(column=0; column<WIDTH; column++) board[row][column] = Full; } int main(void) { int board[HEIGHT][WIDTH]; init(board); ...


2

Use the translate string method. First, you build a translation table that maps each character in one string to the corresponding character in another string. That table is used to translate strings. >>> import string >>> table = string.maketrans("ATCG", "TAGC") >>> 'AAAGTC'.translate(table) 'TTTCAG'


2

Your script have a few errors. First, the variable comp doesn't have a initial value and returns only one "T"(last one) because the other get replaced every time they find a "A" in the loop. For what I understand you are trying to substitute some values in the same string. I find it easier to build a new string with the characters you want to replace. ...


2

Save a copy of the iterator as a named object. Then you can skip ahead if you want to. >>> myiter = iter(range(0, 10)) >>> for i in myiter: print(i) next(myiter, None) ... 0 2 4 6 8


1

[EDIT: This answer addresses what I believe is a problem in your code, but I don't think it fixes the behaviour you describe in your comments. Let me revise this pending more clarification.] I believe the problem you describe is due to your if statement inside the second nested loop: if (r == ListOfGoals.Count) { ListOfBoxes.Add(ListOfDoned[q]); ...


1

No, you don't need unique variable names in different functions. Variables declared with var are local to the function scope in which they are declared in. They will not and do not conflict with anything outside that scope. So, your three functions watchSet(), mathSum() and validateError() can all use var i just fine and will not conflict with each other ...


1

Ofcourse it is going to be only T. Because your loop is just appending T to comp instead of concatenating. Try this: Seq = "AA" #This the sequence of characters def complement (Seq): comp = "" <- declare empty string first for nuc in Seq: if nuc == 'A': comp += 'T' <-- notice the + return comp print "The ...


1

It's because of that after the condition you just put the 'T' on comp and at last returned it: if nuc == 'A': comp = 'T' return comp But as a more pythonic way you can use str.replace() : >>> Seq = "AA" >>> Seq.replace('A','T') 'TT' And if you want to convert each character to a special character based on a condition you ...


1

Here you can find your answer: http://stackoverflow.com/a/1474848/2317535 There is a fantastic package in Python called itertools. But before I get into that, it'd serve well to explain how the iteration protocol is implemented in Python. When you want to provide iteration over your container, you specify the __iter__() class method that provides an ...


1

Every environment variable within a block defined with ( and ) and referenced with %Variable Name% is expanded already by command processor on parsing the block. This can be seen on running a batch file from within a command prompt window with using echo on or having @echo off removed or commented out with rem. The solution is using delayed expansion as ...


1

Try using a more conventional array iteration. function broadcastArray(anum) { for (i = 0; i < textResource[anum].length; i++) { console.log(textResource[anum][i]); } } Here's a simple fiddle to demonstrate a working concept of what you are trying to do.


1

Read the comments - it was a combination of a typo (textRescource instead of textResource), a missing semicolon (var z = 1 instead of var z = 1;) and my trying to make the code accessible (console.log instead of my custom displayupdate).



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