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1122

Use a sequential for loop: var myStringArray = ["Hello","World"]; var arrayLength = myStringArray.length; for (var i = 0; i < arrayLength; i++) { alert(myStringArray[i]); //Do something } @zipcodeman suggests the use of the for...in statement, but for iterating arrays for-in should be avoided, that statement is meant to enumerate object ...


625

It's not that i-- is faster than i++. Actually, they're both as fast. What takes time in ascending loops, is to evaluate, for each i, the size of your array. In this loop: for(var i = array.length; i--; ) You evaluate .length only once, when you declare i, whereas for this loop for(var i = 1; i <= array.length; i++ ) you evaluate .length each time ...


531

The reason is that one construct... var a = []; a[5] = 5; // Perfectly legal JavaScript that resizes the array. for (var i=0; i<a.length; i++) { // Iterates over numeric indexes from 0 to 5, as everyone expects. } can sometimes be totally different from the other... var a = []; a[5] = 5; for (var x in a) { // Shows only the explicitly set ...


378

you can do the following: for (Direction dir : Direction.values()) { // do what you want }


337

As others have said, the issue is the store to the memory location in the array: x[i][j]. Here's a bit of insight why: You have a 2-dimensional array, but memory in the computer is inherently 1-dimensional. So while you imagine your array like this: 0,0 | 0,1 | 0,2 | 0,3 ----+-----+-----+---- 1,0 | 1,1 | 1,2 | 1,3 ----+-----+-----+---- 2,0 | 2,1 | 2,2 | ...


334

++i will increment the value of i, and then return the incremented value. i = 1; j = ++i; (i is 2, j is 2) i++ will increment the value of i, but return the original value that i held before being incremented. i = 1; j = i++; (i is 2, j is 1) For a for loop, either works. ++i seems more common, perhaps because that is what is used in K&R. ...


296

The condition of the for loop is in the middle - between the two semicolons ;. In C++ it is OK to put almost any expression as a condition: anything that evaluates to zero means false; non-zero means true. In your case, the condition is u--: when you convert to C#, simply add != 0: for (u = b.size(), v = b.back(); u-- != 0; v = p[v]) b[u] = v; // ...


258

The first thing is that you don't use such a data structure. If you need a three dimensional matrix, you define one: class Matrix3D { int x; int y; int z; std::vector<int> myData; public: // ... int& operator()( int i, int j, int k ) { return myData[ ((i * y) + j) * z + k ]; } }; Or if you want to index ...


171

The for-in statement by itself is not a "bad practice", however it can be mis-used, for example, to iterate over arrays or array-like objects. The purpose of the for-in statement is to enumerate over object properties, this statement will go up in the prototype chain, enumerating also inherited properties, thing that sometimes is not desired. Also, the ...


163

Another alternative is to append the comma before you append i, just not on the first iteration. (Please don't use "" + i, by the way - you don't really want concatenation here, and StringBuilder has a perfectly good append(int) overload.) int[] array = {1, 2, 3...}; StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder(); for (int i : array) { if ...


157

You can use map (also known as apply in other languages like python, and probably haskell too) [1,2,3,4].map( function(item) { alert(item); }) The general syntax is: array.map(func) func should take one parameter. The return value of array.map is another array, so you can use it like this: var x = [1,2,3,4].map( function(item) { return item * ...


154

$.each( { name: "John", lang: "JS" }, function(i, n){ alert( "Name: " + i + ", Value: " + n ); }); each


146

Lots of accurate answers, but I think it's worth writing out the equivalent while loop. for (u = b.size(), v = b.back(); u--; v = p[v]) b[u] = v; Is equivalent to: u = b.size(); v = b.back(); while(u--) { b[u] = v; v = p[v]; } You might consider refactoring to the while() format as you translate to C#. In my opinion it is clearer, less of a ...


136

This guy compared a lot of loops in javascript, in a lot of browsers. He also has a test suite so you can run them yourself. In all cases (unless I missed one in my read) the fastest loop was: var i = arr.length; //or 10 while(i--) { //... }


132

Quoting John Resig: Currently all major browsers loop over the properties of an object in the order in which they were defined. Chrome does this as well, except for a couple cases. [...] This behavior is explicitly left undefined by the ECMAScript specification. In ECMA-262, section 12.6.4: The mechanics of enumerating the properties ...


128

The pythonic way is to use enumerate: for idx,item in enumerate(list):


127

Use enumerate() like so: def draw_menu(options, selected_index): for (counter, option) in enumerate(options): if counter == selected_index: print " [*] %s" % option else: print " [ ] %s" % option options = ['Option 0', 'Option 1', 'Option 2', 'Option 3'] draw_menu(options, 2)


121

Patrick Smacchia blogged about this last month, with the following conclusions: for loops on List are a bit more than 2 times cheaper than foreach loops on List. Looping on array is around 2 times cheaper than looping on List. As a consequence, looping on array using for is 5 times cheaper than looping on List using foreach (which I believe, ...


118

tourists.removeAll(Collections.singleton(null)); taken from: http://www.mhaller.de/archives/12-How-to-remove-all-null-elements-from-a-Collection.html maybe that will work for you.


117

This lists all the files (and only the files) in the current directory: for /r %i in (*) do echo %i Also if you run that command in a batch file you need to double the % signs. for /r %%i in (*) do echo %%i (thanks @agnul)


115

You have three (or so) options to break out of loops. Suppose you want to sum numbers until the total is greater than 1000. You try var sum = 0 for (i <- 0 to 1000) sum += i except you want to stop when (sum > 1000). What to do? There are several options. (1a) Use some construct that includes a conditional that you test. var sum = 0 (0 to ...


115

You can use an iterator. typedef std::map<std::string, std::map<std::string, std::string>>::iterator it_type; for(it_type iterator = m.begin(); iterator != m.end(); iterator++) { // iterator->first = key // iterator->second = value // Repeat if you also want to iterate through the second map. }


114

I try to give a broad picture with this answer. The following thoughts in brackets was my belief until I have just recently tested the issue: [[In terms of low level languages like C/C++, the code is compiled so that the processor has a special conditional jump command when a variable is zero (or non-zero). Also, if you care about this much optimization, ...


109

Well, it partly depends on the exact type of list. It will also depend on the exact CLR you're using. Whether it's in any way significant or not will depend on whether you're doing any real work in the loop. In almost all cases, the difference to performance won't be significant, but the difference to readability favours the foreach loop. I'd personally ...


108

From Item 46 in Effective Java by Joshua Bloch : The for-each loop, introduced in release 1.5, gets rid of the clutter and the opportunity for error by hiding the iterator or index variable completely. The resulting idiom applies equally to collections and arrays: // The preferred idiom for iterating over collections and arrays for (Element ...


104

Each element of the container is a map<K, V>::value_type, which is a typedef for std::pair<const K, V>. Consequently, you'd write this as for (auto& kv : myMap) { std::cout << kv.first << " has value " << kv.second << std::endl; } For efficiency, it is a good idea to make the parameter in the loop a reference. ...


98

foreach loops demonstrate more specific intent than for loops. Using a foreach loop demonstrates to anyone using your code that you are planning to do something to each member of a collection irrespective of its place in the collection. It also shows you aren't modifying the original collection (and throws an exception if you try to). The other advantage ...


95

The comma is not exclusive of for loops; it is the comma operator. x = (a, b); will do first a, then b, then set x to the value of b. The for syntax is: for (init; condition; increment) ... Which is somewhat (ignoring continue and break for now) equivalent to: init; while (condition) { ... increment; } So your for loop example is (again ...


95

It really doesn't matter. Trust me. The large number of questions on Stack Overflow regarding whether this method or that method is faster, belie the fact that, in the vast majority of cases, code spends most of its time sitting around waiting for users to do something. If you're really concerned, profile it for yourself. But I think you'll most ...


95

No, don't spoil it with a break. This is the last remaining stronghold for the use of goto.



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