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268

The first thing is that you don't use such a data structure. If you need a three dimensional matrix, you define one: class Matrix3D { int x; int y; int z; std::vector<int> myData; public: // ... int& operator()( int i, int j, int k ) { return myData[ ((i * y) + j) * z + k ]; } }; Or if you want to index ...


86

Ok, so first off, let me say this: Use while(true), as it gives the most semantic meaning. You need to parse for (;;) as it's not something you see often. With that said, let's analyze: Opcodes The code while(true) { break; } echo "hi!"; Compiles down to the opcodes: 0: JMPZ(true, 3) 1: BRK(1, 3) 2: JMP(0) 3: ECHO("hi!") So basically, it does a ...


75

Yes, they are equivalent in behavior. Then why do people use the (1 << 7) version? I guess, they use it to document it is a power of 2. Calculating the condition every time must be an overhead! I am unable to find the reason behind this! Not really, any normal compiler will replace 1 << 7 by 128 and so both loops will have the same ...


64

What does dis tell us: Python 3.4.1 (default, May 19 2014, 13:10:29) [GCC 4.2.1 Compatible Apple LLVM 5.1 (clang-503.0.40)] on darwin Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information. >>> from dis import dis >>> dis("""x = [1,2,3,4,5] ... for x in x: ... print(x) ... print(x)""") 1 0 LOAD_CONST ...


54

I will explain the process of how I would come to understand this code to the point where I would be comfortable using it myself. I will pretend that I did not read you description, so I am starting from scratch. The process is divided into stages which I will number as I go. My goal will be to give some general techniques which will make programs easier to ...


47

It's because the for loop has been defined that way in the Java Language Specification. 14.14.1 The basic for statement BasicForStatement: for ( ForInit ; Expression ; ForUpdate ) Statement ForStatementNoShortIf: for ( ForInit ; Expression ; ForUpdate ) StatementNoShortIf ForInit: StatementExpressionList LocalVariableDeclaration ...


41

Using your example code as the core reference x = [1,2,3,4,5] for x in x: print x print x I would like you to refer the section 7.3. The for statement in the manual Excerpt 1 The expression list is evaluated once; it should yield an iterable object. An iterator is created for the result of the expression_list. What it means is that your ...


38

Using a macro to hide the for loops can be a lot confusing, just to save few characters. I'd use range-for loops instead: for (auto& k : A) for (auto& i : k) for (auto& j : i) do_something_on_A(j); Of course you can replace auto& with const auto& if you are, in fact, not modifying the data.


35

Unfortunately, this is not easy to read. Your are misreading the second case of the for statement. The first semicolon is integral part of declaration and thus hidden to your eyes. You can easily check such syntax question by looking into Annex A. There you have (6.7) declaration: declaration-specifiers init-declarator-listopt ; ...


32

What you're missing is when each of those sections of the for statement happen: for (int i = 0 ; i < 3 ; i++) // 111111111 22222 333 The first bit happens once before any iterations are done. The second expression is evaluated before each potential iteration and, if false, no further iterations are done. The third bit is done at the end of each ...


30

Let's translate each one of these options into plain English: for(i = 0; i < (1 << 7); i++) // For every possible combination of 7 bits for(i = 0; i < 128; i++) // For every number between 0 and 127 Runtime behavior should be identical in both cases. In fact, assuming a decent compiler, even the assembly code should be identical. So the ...


29

This loop is often observed in binary indexed tree (or BIT) implementation which is useful to update range or point and query range or point in logarithmic time. This loop helps to choose the appropriate bucket based on the set bit in the index. For more details, please consider to read about BIT from some other source. In below post I will show how does ...


27

The basic for statement structure is as follows: BasicForStatement: for ( [ForInit] ; [Expression] ; [ForUpdate] ) Statement Now, from JLS ยง14.14.1.3. Abrupt Completion of for Statement: If execution of the Statement completes abruptly because of a continue with no label, then the following two steps are performed in sequence: First, if the ...


24

If you see, the syntax is, for ( declaration expression1opt ; expression2opt ) statement Let's compare it with a general statement for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) printf("%d \t", i); Here, int i = 0; denotes declaration [includes the ;] i < 10 denotes expression1opt [optional] ; is as per the syntax requirement of ; [must, as described in ...


22

A minimal auto reference The loop can be declared as follows: for (auto& it : foo) { // ^ the additional & is needed /*ToDo - Operate on 'it'*/ } This will allow it to be a reference to each element in foo. There is some debate as to the "canonical form" of these loops, but the auto& should do the trick in this case. General auto ...


22

The production for declaration is: declaration:     declaration-specifiers init-declarator-listopt ; So the semicolon is already part of it.


21

First of all, I would recommend against writing the code this way. The purpose of the code is "count up from zero to n if n is positive, count down from 0 to n if n is negative", but I would be inclined to instead write: for (int i = 0; i < abs(n); i += 1) { int argument = n < 0 ? -i : i; f(argument, n); } But that does not answer your ...


21

To answer your questions we can check the bytecode generated by the two functions using the dis module: In [5]: def no_unpacking(): ...: s = [] ...: for item in SEQUENCE: ...: s.append(item[0] + item[1]) ...: return s ...: ...: ...: def unpacking(): ...: s = [] ...: for a,b in SEQUENCE: ...: ...


21

When reading this question and some of the answers, one can get the impression, that Iterable#forEach in combination with lambda expressions is a shortcut/replacement for writing a traditional for-each loop. This is simply not true. This code from the OP: joins.forEach(join -> mIrc.join(mSession, join)); is not intended as a shortcut for writing for ...


20

You should put your loops inside a function and then return: def myfunc(): for i in range(1, 1001): for i2 in range(i, 1001): for i3 in range(i2, 1001): if i*i + i2*i2 == i3*i3 and i + i2 + i3 == 1000: print i*i2*i3 return # Exit the function (and stop all of the loops) myfunc() ...


20

Sebastian's answer is accurate, but I wanted to know why it was safe, so I did some digging into the Map source code. It looks like on a call to delete(k, v), it basically just sets a flag (as well as changing the count value) instead of actually deleting the value: b->tophash[i] = Empty; (Empty is a constant for the value 0) What the map appears to ...


20

I'm assuming you're on Windows, because this behavior seems about right for Windows. When you enter a character, you do something like this: Press a Press return What step 2 does is passes a line separator sequence that tells the input console that you have pressed enter and wish to go to the next line. This sequence also tells the console that you have ...


19

1 << 7 is a constant expression, the compiler treats it like 128, there's no overhead in run time. Without the loop body, it's hard to say why the author uses it. Possibly it's a loop that iterates something associated with 7 bits, but that's just my guess.


18

Obviously... if (map.empty()) { // do stuff if map is empty } else for (auto it = map.begin(); it != map.end(); ++it) { // do iteration on stuff if it is not } By the way, since we are talking C++11 here, you can use this syntax: if (map.empty()) { // do stuff if map is empty } else for (auto it : map) { // do iteration on stuff if it is ...


18

Something like this can help: template <typename Container, typename Function> void for_each3d(const Container &container, Function function) { for (const auto &i: container) for (const auto &j: i) for (const auto &k: j) function(k); } int main() { vector< vector< ...


17

Faulty benchmarking. The non exhaustive list of what is wrong: No proper warmup: single shot measurements are almost always wrong; Mixing several codepaths in the single method: we probably start compiling the method with the execution data available only for the first loop in the method; Sources are predictable: should the loop compile, we can actually ...


17

This happens because the maximum value of an int on your architecture can never reach 10000000000. It will overflow at some point before reaching that value. Thus, the condition i < 10000000000 will always evaluate as true, meaning this is an infinite loop. The compiler is able to deduct this at compile time, which is why it generates appropriate ...


17

replace 0 <= n ? (i++) : (i--) with i += ((0 <= n) ? 1 : -1) that should work


17

I would use auto&&: for (auto&& it : foo) { // bla } The reason is spelt out in N3994 "Range-Based For-Loops: The Next Generation (Revision 1)" that it would better work with proxy objects (such as those coming from std::vector<bool>). In fact, that proposal for C++1z (supported already by Clang 3.5 SVN in -std=c++1z mode) ...


16

Use ng-if (or ng-show): <div ng-repeat="i in values"> <div ng-if="i !== 0"></div> </div> Attached to the element, this will decide whether to display it or not. Documentation for ng-if can be found here. However, if you want to only do something if you are looping the first or last item, you can use $first and $last properties ...



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