Hot answers tagged

6

2 forks - Four processes. Each process has two printfs with hello (one in main and one in doit - hence 8.


4

I just worked it out and I think 1, 3, and 5 are correct. There are 4 processes, but 2 have a dependency relationship because of the wait. This means the possible outputs are (_ means preemption possible): _A_0_B_0_ _C_ _D_0_ 2 and 4 do not work because there is no 0 between A and B. The wait is called in a process where fork()!=0, which means it is a ...


3

Your approach is indeed a bit overcomplicated. This can be achieved with just one childprocess and a single pipe (just as in the original shell command). Let's have a look at it: grep text < file.txt | wc -l > out.txt This creates a pipe forks two processes makes grep write to the pipe makes wc read from the pipe But it is enough to fork only ...


1

Per the fork() man page it seems your problem is that you have the child and parent inverted. fork() returns 0 to the child process, it returns > 0 to the parent, and returns -1 on error. So in your code you should have: if(msg_pqid == 0) { /* The child sends the message */ } else { /* Parent receives the message */ } I prefer to use a ...


1

The reason is standard output is usually line buffered, you will need a new line to flush the output, like printf("p[%d][%d] %s\n", i, j, pString[i][j]);.


1

It's quite interesting and looks like the answer is output buffering. For example we have: #include <unistd.h> #include <stdio.h> int main() { for(int i=0;i<2;i++) { if(fork()==0) { printf("Hi %d %d %d\n",i,getpid(),getppid()); } } } If run this code in terminal there will be 3 lines, but if I will redirect the output to ...


1

You cannot use execlp to run the command cd, which is a shell builtin command, instead you should call chdir if you are on Linux, to change the current working directory of your process. int chdir(const char *path); Also check the return value of execlp: int ret = execlp(command[cont_arg], command[cont_arg], arg[cont_arg], NULL); if (ret < 0) { ...


1

The first system call is "who" No, those are not system calls. The term "system call" is used for something completely different. whoand ls are programs that you execute with exec. cd on the other hand is a shell command. So executing cd, even if you did it correctly will not have any effect. Since cd just tells the shell process to change its internal ...



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