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7

One big advantage of having the parent process duplicated in the child is that it allows the parent program to make customizations to the child process' environment before executing it. For example, the parent might want to read the child process' stdout, in which case it needs to set up the pipes in order to allow it to read that before execing the new ...


5

fork() system call creates a child which executes the same code as the parent. From that moment, there are 2 processes executing the next line: parent and child. Each of them executes the printf(). The second time the for loop is executed, it is executed by the parent and the child: each of them execute fork(), and so from that moment there are 4 ...


3

int main() { char * args[] = {"ls","/home/",NULL}; pid_t pid = fork(); switch(pid) { case -1: return; case 0://child execvp(args[0],args); _exit(1); default://parent return; } } This works. Try out and read its MAN page.


3

There are some very legitimate uses of the fork system call. Here are a few examples: Memory saving. Because fork on any modern UNIX/Linux system shares memory between the child and parent (via copy-on-write semantics), a parent process can load some static data which can be instantly shared to a child process. The zygote process on Android does this: it ...


3

Contrary to all expectations, it's mainly fork that makes process creation so incredibly fast on Unices. AFAIK, on Linux, the actual process memory is not copied upon fork, the child starts with the same virtual memory mapping as the parent, and pages are copied only where and when the child makes changes. The majority of pages are read-only code anyway, so ...


2

fflush(stdin) is never the right thing to do, although lots of people have tried it. fflush is only for output. Your memset is pure insanity. The argument to wait isn't supposed a signal number - it's not even the right type, so you should have got a warning which you apparently ignored. Those are the easy errors. There is a deeper conceptual problems with ...


2

I think you are looking for a combination of fork and execl. You can fork to create multiple instances and then replace one of the forked process with another process by using exec(In your case it is the same process). Through execl you can give command line arguments. You may need to use sprintf in the exec'd process and sscanf in the original process. I ...


1

The Web Workers standard defines a way for JavaScript to use multiple threads and do a lot more work in parallel than a single thread can manage. There are several implementations of this for NodeJS including the webworker-threads NPM module. Using fork is going down a multi-process path that is usually far more difficult to coordinate. The NodeJS Cluster ...


1

I would suggest using something like Redis as your Queue. Here's a tutorial of creating a message bus in Node with Redis and Kue. This will scale pretty well and allow you to have multiple processes, threads, or even machines producing and consuming items to/from the queue.


1

I'd like to provide an option that doesn't exactly answer your question but might be useful in a situation similar to yours when there is flexibility in choosing technologies. If offloading work to the .NET environment (C#, F#, IronPython, PowerShell, etc.) is acceptable, you might be interested in the Edge.js project. This way you can use Node for ...


1

Why fork()? It had nothing to do with C. C was itself only coming into existence at the time. It's because of the way the original UNIX memory page and process management worked, it was trivial to cause a process to be paged out, and then paged back in at a different location, without unloading the first copy of the process. In The Evolution of the Unix ...


1

I have a file that I want to run multiple instances of To do that you have two options : 1. You can use multiple fork() system call to duplicate new child processes and open the file in those processes. 2. You can have multiple threads in your program that open the same file. But looking at the next three dots, fork() is the choice to go with. ...


1

The C I/O streams are normally buffered, that means that when you do e.g. fprintf then what you print to the stream isn't actually written to the file, it's written into an in-memory buffer. When the buffer is full then the data in it is actually written to the file. The fflush function flushes the buffer, i.e. it takes what's in the buffer and writes it ...


1

Regarding your first problem, you need not call pthread_exit. If your main program want to keep track of the threads, you may use pthread_join and check the return status of the threads. Regarding your second problem, you can avoid heap memory allocation by just using: pthread_t work_threads[MAX_FORKS_ALLOWED]; Regarding your third question, as ...


1

According to Configuration and Config Vars, you set config vars like so: heroku config:set GITHUB_USERNAME=joesmith Since all Heroku commands support the --app switch, you do this for your production app: heroku config:set GITHUB_USERNAME=joesmith --app app_production and use --app app_staging for your staging app.



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