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#include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <unistd.h> #include <sys/types.h> #include <sys/wait.h> Do not mix headers like that. sys/ headers go first. int main(int argc, char** argv) { if(0 != setpgid(0,0)) { fprintf(stderr, "Process group creation failed."); } Yoda-style comparisons look terrible and ...


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The execve call is causing a segfault: ==22934== Command: ./testt bash -c echo\ Test ==22934== ==22935== Syscall param execve(argv) points to unaddressable byte(s) ==22935== at 0x4EF9537: execve (in /usr/lib64/libc-2.20.so) ==22935== by 0x4EF9D35: execvpe (in /usr/lib64/libc-2.20.so) ==22935== by 0x400822: main (testt.c:23) ==22935== Address ...


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One observation: the complete lack of newlines in the print statements means that the output is only flushed when the processes terminate. This makes it harder to see what's going on. Because the characters will be flushed when the process exits, one non-zero digit and its following zero will normally appear together. Superficially, the 30 should appear ...


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Marshal.load will only load the first dump, and ignore the rest. For example: Marshal.load(Marshal.dump("one") + Marshal.dump("two")) #=> "one" Edit: To fix this, you could write the data directly, instead of using Marshal.dump. How well that works depends on the data you're trying to send. Alternatively, you can add padding/markers, something ...


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What is the actual goal here? Fork has hooks because the state of the child with presence of threads in undefined. So by hooking yourself up you can ensure whatever mechanisms you want to use remain operational (for instance, if the fork happened after one of your threads takes a lock, the lock will remain taken within the child - what now?). In general ...


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Standard C (before C99) needs variables to be declared at the beginning of a bloc. A function (including main) is a bloc in that sense. The switch could be a block, but a case is not, so you cannot declare new variables in a case. The real error is at char str1[MSGSIZE]; which is not accepted by the compiler, and as such str1 is not declared what causes the ...


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The compiler has no idea about processes. It only cares about braces. You are getting the errors because you are in a c89 mode, where variables must be declared at the beginning of the scope (notice that case does not open a scope). Try to make the entire contents of case 0 into a block, or pass -std=c99 option to the compiler.


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On Linux, you might also use proc(5). The process of pid 1234 is described by the directory /proc/1234/ and you could read sequentially and parse the /proc/1234/status pseudo-file to get all that information. To understand a bit more, read the proc(5) man page, then type cat /proc/self/status cat /proc/$$/status cat /proc/self/maps cat /proc/$$/maps ...


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You could exploit the fact that the parent will be a process group leader (and thus its pid will be the same as its process group id) while the child will be a member of that process group and thus its pid will be different from the process group id: #include <stdio.h> #include <unistd.h> main(int argc, char **argv) { char *self = NULL; ...


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Setup a signal handler for SIGCHLD in one of the processes and end the other one. If the SIGCHLD handler gets called you know the child died. If not the parent died. Another (less distructive) way it to call wait(). If it returns ECHLD no child is around, thus the calling process is the child. If it blocks, at least one child is around, thus the calling ...


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You are probably facing a race here. The parent receives the SIGUSR1 before its handler for this signal had been set up. As the default behaviour on receiving a SIGUSR1 is to end, the parent dies. You want to setup the signal handler inside the parent before forking off the child. (If from the programs design it is unacceptbale for the child to have ...


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You could fork off a launcher&killer (l&k) process for each process to be launched and killed. This l&k process forks-off the actual process to be killed later, stores its pid globally (that is local to this l&k process) and then sets up as an alarm handler (using alarm()) to kill the actual process it forked-off beforehand. To avoid a ...


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Ignore what I said in comments: I believe you are looking for setitimer with ITIMER_VIRTUAL. You would call this in the child before execve. It can trigger a fatal signal after a certain amount of CPU time elapsed, with a resolution in microseconds, and (unlike timer_create and ualarm) is documented to survive execve. Note however that nothing stops the ...


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Have a look at Beej's guide to non-blocking socket programming: http://beej.us/guide/bgnet/output/html/singlepage/bgnet.html#select


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To redirect output from a pipe to a file, somebody needs to read from the read end of the pipe and write to the file's file descriptor. It can't be done merely by duping the file descriptors. For instance, say you have a pipe int filedes[2]; pipe (filedes); and a file FILE *logfile = fopen (logfile_path, "w"); int logfd = fileno (logfile); you could ...


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replace the pcntl_wait cycle by: while(pcntl_waitpid( 0, $status)!=-1);


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IMHO, you should de-couple the process control from your web application process. Use a process control system like supervisord to start/stop/restart long-running applications; this can be done over XML-RPC. Not a bad plus that Pyramid creator Chris McDonough is the primary author of Supervisor too.


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The provided solution is wrong because the processes A,B,C are brothers. The solution in which A is grandparent , B is parent and C is a child of B is the following: This is the solution: #include <stdio.h> #include <unistd.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <time.h> #include <sys/types.h> #include <sys/wait.h> int n; int ...


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Is there a simpler way of avoiding this "child process inheriting sockets" problem? Yes, just pass close_fds=True to the Popen constructor or wrapper function. This closes all fds except 0, 1, and 2.* If you need to keep some different set alive instead of 0, 1, and 2, use pass_fds=[0, 2, special_file.fileno()] instead of close_fds=True. But hopefully ...


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That's just a bug. Given it affects both gdb & lldb it is probably in CoreOS not the debuggers (though the same folks did the Mach specific layer of both debuggers so that's not a guarantee...) Anyway, please file a bug report with http://bugreporter.apple.com.


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One or more of your pointers (A, NH, NS, or in_boat) is probably not valid. This may mean that shmat() returned its error indication value (which according to the man page is (void *)-1). Your code should check for this error indication value, and look at errno to find out why shmat() failed.


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The code is broken. UX's fork, forks the current process (creates a "branch" of the current process); anyway the fork return code is the newly created child process id (from within the parent/original process) or 0 (from the child/"forked" process).


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Each child needs it's own pipes back to parent, so p should be a 2d array, p[child][file id]. At no time are you trying to collect the command data at no point are you accessing the pipe relating to stdout of the command. How do you plan to send the commands output back to the parent. You need to tell the parent how many bytes of text coming, then writing ...


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I took the sample from Adrien Descamps' link (see also comments above) and C++-ified and modified it a little: #include <thread> #include <iostream> #include <atomic> #include <unistd.h> #include <syslog.h> #include <sys/wait.h> std::atomic<bool> go(true); void syslogBlaster() { int j = 0; while(go) { ...


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When the child process is created,the parent get child id from which parent can send different type of messages to child(kill,etc). When parent process finish before child process then the all live child processes become child of process 0. For that this id used. Even child can get his id by using getpid() and parent id by using getppid().


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The return value from fork() in the parent, is how the parent finds out the PID of the child process. The child process doesn't need to find out its PID from the fork() call, since it can call getpid(), and find out its parent's PID with getppid().


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You don't show the declaration of pid. I guess it was wrongly defined as some unsigned integral type. You should declare: pid_t pid; before the line if ((pid = fork()) == 0) and this is documented in fork(2) which also reminds you that you need to have #include <unistd.h> near the start of your source file.


1

Unless you distinguish between the parent and the child by checking fork()'s return code and applying different logic respectively, both the parent and the child will proceed identically by printing the line and exiting.


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According to man 7 pipe, "If a process attempts to read from an empty pipe, then read(2) will block until data is available.". So if the read occurs before the write, it will wait until the write is done. Reciprocally, if the read occurs after the write, it's obvious it will return the message. And at least one of these cases must be true, because, still ...


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If you're going to exit the process, there's no point in calling munmap(). The memory will be unmapped for that process when the process exits. fclose() will flush any buffers holding unwritten data to the file. In all processes - the parent and the child. Whether or not you want that is up to you. exit() implicitly flushes all buffers. _exit() does ...


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For completeness here is another answer with a working example by Thomas Orozco: http://stackoverflow.com/a/12309286/491827


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The Forks::Super module provides many useful facilities for handling forked processes, as well as offering a more portable interface. This program runs notepad to edit the program's own source file and kills the child process after five seconds. If you need to pass parameters to the command then you should specify it as an anonymous array of values like ...


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What you're trying to do is impossible, because it doesn't make sense. The child has the same stdin as the parent, not a new one that you can write to. POSIX guarantees that after fork: The child process shall have its own copy of the parent's file descriptors. Each of the child's file descriptors shall refer to the same open file description with the ...


0

You really should RTFM but :- fork() creates an identical copy of the current procedure running from the same line of code. The only difference between the two copies is the return code from fork(). This will be 0 if you are in the newly created copy or the process id of the newly created copy if you are in the original executable (or -1 if something went ...


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More specifically, from the Redis FAQ Redis background saving schema relies on the copy-on-write semantic of fork in modern operating systems: Redis forks (creates a child process) that is an exact copy of the parent. The child process dumps the DB on disk and finally exits. In theory the child should use as much memory as the parent being a copy, but ...


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In the for loop in the parent, you close the read side of the pipe on the first iteration, so the read in the second iteration is failing. Move the close outside of the loop. (And check for errors!!)


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After each time you call fork, you wait for the process you just created to finish. You should create all your processes before you wait for any of them. You have a few other bugs. You close fd[1] in each pass of the loop, but then try to read from it in the next pass of the loop. You can use a different pipe to each child if you want, but if you're going ...


0

Apart from the fact that cloning is from server to your machine and forking is making a copy on the server itself, an important difference is that when we clone, we actually get all the branches, labels, etc. But when we fork, we actually only get the current files in the master branch, nothing other than that. This means we don't get the other branches, ...


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A PIPE channel is a uni-directional communication channel. If you want the child process to write back to the parent process, you will need a second PIPE channel, different than the one used for receiving the message from the parent.


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Your psuedocode isn't enough to get much of anywhere - notably you don't define your sockets there, so I don't even know which side is the REQ and which side is the REP (or, indeed, that you're actually using those socket types), or which side binds and which side connects. But, my first guess is that you've got an uneven send/receive pairing, and something ...


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Think I fixed it, I have reaching the limit of filedescriptors – user3358907


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Bur when checked with runningProcess, It seems both screens are dealt with single processID Correct. how does the android manage two instances of the same applications being handled by single process at the same time ? There is only one instance of the application. There may be two instances of the login activity.


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Pipes work with unstructured binary data (just like all other files), so the only way to tell is to pass more data, like a flag indicating what will be sent next. If you're working on a large project, you can simplify your life by using a serialization system like Google's Protocol Buffers. Of course, in your particular case you can rely on the first byte ...


1

Not sure who you're trying to mess with here ;-), but the answer to your question is to use execv(). The first argument is the path of the executable to actually run, and the second argument is the argv[] array that program will receive. If you change its argv[0], your value will show up in top/ps instead of the real program name. For example: #include ...


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the following code shows how to handle fork and child processes. the code compiles cleanly, is tested and works #define _POSIX_SOURCE #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <unistd.h> #include <sys/types.h> #include <time.h> #include <signal.h> #include <sys/wait.h> int main( void ) { //int status; ...


1

Some issues in your code: 1) As @Peter Schneider points out, parent process waits for a child to exit so that it doesn't get to the code which would kill the children So first of all, you have to get rid of: if(pid != 0){ wait(NULL); } 2) The for loop that kills the children has to be executed only by the parent process, so the if clause ...


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I am not sure about other parts of your logic (e.g. the if clause inside the fork loop), but if(pid != 0){ wait(NULL); } looks suspiciously as of the parent process waits for a child to exit so that it doesn't get to the code which would kill the children at all (unless they exit on their own, but then the killing seems pointless).


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I think what is happening is when the child process exits the if statement, it is spawning a child process and trying to cloes a pipe that is already closed: pid_t pid1 = fork(); if (pid1 == 0) { // child 1 comes here if (close(fds[0]) < 0) { fprintf(stderr, "ERROR, unable to close read end of pipe: %s\n", strerror(errno)); } // ...


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Changed your code as follow and this would worked for you: int main(int argc, char const *argv[]) { int c2p[2]; int i; int stat; for (i = 1; i < argc; i++ ) { pipe(c2p); if (fork() == 0) { //child code if (fork() == 0) { //grandchild code ...


0

Two problems: you can't write an integer that way, write expects a pointer, so int n; ...; write(fd, &n, sizeof n); execlp replaces the process that calls it, meaning if it works you'll never write zero to the pipe, because the grandchild has been replaced by the program it's execlp()ing



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