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65

In the context of computer science, a word is the concatenation of symbols. The used symbols are called the alphabet. For example, some words formed out of the alphabet {0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9} would be 1, 2, 12, 543, 1000, and 002. A language is then a subset of all possible words. For example, we might want to define a language that captures all elite MI6 ...


34

Constructing an equivalent Regular Grammar from a Regular Expression First, I start with some simple rules to construct Regular Grammar(RG) from Regular Expression(RE). I am writing rules for Right Linear Grammar (leaving as an exercise to write similar rules for Left Linear Grammar) NOTE: Capital letters are used for variables, and small for terminals ...


20

How to write CFG with example ambn L = {am bn | m >= n}. Language description: am bn consist of a followed by b where number of a are equal or more then number of b. some example strings: {^, a, aa, aab, aabb, aaaab, ab......} So there is always one a for one b but extra a are possible. infect string can be consist of a only. Also notice ^ null ...


15

I recently wrote a rather long article on this topic: The true power of regular expressions. To summarize: Regular expressions with support for recursive subpattern references can match all context-free languages (e.g a^n b^n). Regular expressions with lookaround assertions and subpattern references can match at least some context-sensitive languages ...


14

Infix notation is easy to read for humans, whereas pre-/postfix notation is easier to parse for a machine. The big advantage in pre-/postfix notation is that there never arise any questions like operator precedence. For example, consider the infix expression 1 # 2 $ 3. Now, we don't know what those operators mean, so there are two possible corresponding ...


13

I've read that most programming languages can be parsed as a context free grammar (CFG). In term of computational power, it equals the one of a pushdown non deterministic automaton. Am I right? Technically yes. Usefully, no. There are at least two useful ways to think about these questions: If you're thinking of a set of strings, you have a ...


12

As Henning said, parser combinators would work for this. Here's an example using Parsec: import Text.Parsec grammar = many braces >> return () where braces = choice [ between (char '(') (char ')') grammar , between (char '[') (char ']') grammar , between (char '{') (char '}') grammar ...


11

The reason that finite languages work with the pumping lemma is because you can make the pumping length longer than the longest word in the language. The pumping lemma, as stated on Wikipedia (I don't have my theory of computation book with me) is the following: Let L be a regular language. Then there exists an integer p ≥ 1 depending only on L such ...


10

To cover the Racket part of it: People often write parsers and there are many ways to do so: Write a recursive descent parser manually. Use the parser-tools library in Racket, which is lex/yacc style. Use Ragg, an AST generator generator letting you write BNF. Use Parsack, a monadic parser combinator library similar to Haskell's Parsec. I'm probably ...


10

Here is an algorithm where each transition is incrementally replaced with a regex, until there is only an initial and final state: http://www.cs.uiuc.edu/class/sp09/cs373/lectures/lect_08.pdf [PDF]


9

Recursively enumerable languages/sets are also known as semi-decidable. They aren't decidable, because there isn't a machine that looks at the input and says yes or no. Semi-decidable means you can write a machine that looks at the input and either says yes or fails to halt. Semi-decidable turns out to be equivalent to recursively enumerable in the same way ...


8

Modern regex engines can certainly parse a bigger set of languages than the regular languages set. So said, none of the four classic Chomsky sets are exactly recognized by regexes. All regular languages are clearly recognized by regexes. There are some classic context-free languages that cannot be recognized by regexes, such as the balanced parenthesis ...


8

Well, "the usual" way to do this in Common Lisp is … to do it in Lisp. A lot of domain-specific languages (and Lisp is pretty much notoriously specialized for this purpose!) are simply written as extensions to Lisp itself, using the macro facility. The upside is, it's trivial to write a DSL. The downside is, they often tend to "look like" lisp. Some ...


8

Every programming language is a formal language, so that it does not make much sense to me to speak of a “formal programming language.” (Or does somebody know an informal programming language?) Formal language is a language with mathematically precise construction rules. Or, more precisely, it’s a set of words over some alphabet. For example, if you take ...


8

Recursive functions and recursive sets are terms used in computability theory. Wikipedia defines them as follows: A set of natural numbers is said to be a computable set (also called a decidable, recursive, or Turing computable set) if there is a Turing machine that, given a number n, halts with output 1 if n is in the set and halts with output 0 if n is ...


8

@larsmans already supplied the answer, I just like to give an example of the legal negations in ANTLR rules (since it happens quite a lot that mistakes are made with them). The negation operator in ANTLR is ~ (tilde). Inside lexer rules, the ~ negates a single character: NOT_A : ~'A'; matches any character except 'A' and: NOT_LOWER_CASE : ~('a'..'z'); ...


7

Edit: short answer, * means "zero or more repetitions" in almost all regex/grammar syntaxes include perl5 and RFC 5234. * typically binds more tightly than concatenation and alternation. You say you want a language over the alphabet (a, b), but include c and U in your expressions. I'm going to assume that you want a language grammar over the alphabet (a, ...


7

Using a left fold import Data.List (foldl') isBalanced xs = null $ foldl' op [] xs where op ('(':xs) ')' = xs op ('[':xs) ']' = xs op ('{':xs) '}' = xs op xs x = x:xs The fold builds up a stack of previously encountered characters, stripping away any matches as it finds them. If you end up with an empty list, the string is balanced. ...


7

At the time of reading the data into your data frame from the text file you can specify the type of each column using the colClasses argument. See below a file have in my computer: > head(read.csv("R/Data/ZipcodeCount.csv")) X zipcode stateabb countyno countyname 1 1 401 NY 119 WESTCHESTER 2 391 501 NY 103 ...


7

You are confusing the specification of a program with its output. For example, a Turing machine that can accept a recursively enumerable language is still specified by a finite transition function or "rule table". The rule table itself can be expressed in a regular language. Then again, only the basic syntax of a modern programming language is completely ...


7

First of all, data types do not always describe a set of strings (i.e., a language). That is, while a list type does, a tree type does not. One might counter that we could "flatten" the trees into lists and think of that as their language. Yet, what about data types like data F = F Int (Int -> Int) or, worse data R = R (R -> Int) ? Polynomial ...


6

It's been a while since I've handled formal language theory, but I'll bite. "Context-free" means that the production rules required in the corresponding grammar do not have a "context". It does not mean that a specific symbol cannot appear in different rules. Addressing the edit: in other words (and more informally), deciding whether a language is ...


6

The main idea of the pumping lemma is to tell you that when you have a regular language L with infinite number of terms, then there is a size S and an infinite subset X of terms T in language L with length(T) > S for all T in X such that all the terms in X will contain the same pattern P inside them. Intuitively, each term in the set X will repeat the ...


6

I know the deadline has passed, but somebody might find this useful in the future. (a+b+c)*WcW^R, where W is in (a+b)+; this is non-deterministic because you don't know where the "WcW" bit starts. W^RcW(a+b+c)*, where W is in (a+b)+; this is deterministic because you can write a deterministic PDA to accept simple palindromes of the form "W^RcW" and modify ...


6

Maybe you think you want to do this, but you don't really want to do this. New Pythoners usually think they need to round floating point numbers because when evaluated they get unexpected results (like 1.0/10 = 0.100000000000001). Rather than do some goofy string substitution on your expression, I just created a variable for round(49/200,n), and did a little ...


6

The meaning of these terms varies depending upon your context. If we were discussing them purely from the standpoint of writing programs then recursive sets don't make much sense; however, it might just be that I have encountered it yet. That said, recursive functions are functions that call themselves in their execution. The calculation of a nth Fibonacci ...


5

ANTLR produces parsers for context-free languages (CFLs). In that context, not would translate to complement and and to intersection. However, CFLs aren't closed under complement and intersection, i.e. not(rule) is not necessarily a CFG rule. In other words, it's impossible to implement not and and in a sane way, so they're not supported.


5

There are a few of metrics you could use: The length of a valid match. Some regexs have a fixed size, some an upper limit and some a lower limit. Compare how similar their lengths or possible lengths are. The characters that match. Any regex will have a set of characters a match can contain (maybe all characters). Compare the set of included characters. ...


5

You can build deterministic finite-state machines for both regular expressions and compare the transitions. The difference of both transitions can then be used to measure the distance of these regular expressions.


5

The problem you're describing is an issue with creating LR(0) parsers - that is, bottom-up parsers that don't do any lookahead to symbols beyond the current one they are parsing. The grammar you've described doesn't appear to be an LR(0) grammar, which is why you run into trouble when trying to parse it w/o lookahead. It does appear to be LR(1), however, so ...



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