Hot answers tagged

134

For new Chrome versions you can just put autocomplete="new-password" in your password field and that's it. I've checked it, works fine. Got that tip from Chrome developer in this discussion: https://code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=370363#c7 P.S. don't forget to use unique names for different fields to prevent autofilling.


45

After adding implicit messages parameters to views you can just add the following imports and use the old controller classes or even objects without any additional changes: import play.api.Play.current import play.api.i18n.Messages.Implicits._


41

Attach an event listener to the form using .addEventListener() and then call the .preventDefault() method on event: var element = document.querySelector("form"); element.addEventListener("submit", function(event) { event.preventDefault(); // actual logic, e.g. validate the form alert("Form submission cancelled."); }); <form> ...


24

People using FastClick: Use this CSS: label > * { display: block; pointer-events: none; } see this issue: https://github.com/ftlabs/fastclick/issues/60 and this codepen: http://codepen.io/visnup/pen/XJNvEq


24

Using view form helpers (such as @inputText) requires you to pass an implicit play.api.i18n.Messages parameter to your view. You can do this adding (implicit messages: Messages) to the signature in your view. Your view becomes this: @(helloForm: Form[(String,Int,Option[String])])(implicit messages: Messages) @import helper._ @main(title = "The ...


21

The exact answer to the question is: yes, you can use an arbitrary value for the boundary parameter, given it does not exceed 70 bytes in length. If you are using one of multipart/* content types, you are actually required to specify the boundary parameter in the Content-Type header, otherwise the server (in the case of an HTTP request) will not be able to ...


19

I know, it's a tad bit too late to answer, but all you need to do is, force all forms dirty. Take a look at the following snippet: angular.forEach($scope.myForm.$error.required, function(field) { field.$setDirty(); }); and then you can check if your form is valid using: if($scope.myForm.$valid) { //Do something } and finally, I guess, you ...


17

$('form[name="myform"]')[0].reset();


17

? is used to separate the URL path from the query string. In this case, the query string is empty, so it's the same as if it had been action="". However, there's a difference. If the original page was loaded using a URL that had a query string, action="" will submit the form with that same query string. Putting an explicit ? in the URL replaces the original ...


17

see here an example, in Angular 2 this is a way to disable a button until the whole form is valid: <button type="submit" [disabled]="!ngForm.valid">Submit</button>


17

First and foremost, the <form> element predates Ajax calls by years. Ajax calls (it's better if you call them XMLHttpRequest) were an addition in Internet Explorer to make it possible to load/post data from JavaScript. Perhaps most importantly, if you'd stop support either <form> elements or XMLHttpRequest, you'd break basically all existing ...


16

What worked for me is having word "-search-" in the id of the form, something like <form id="affiliate-search-form"> - and lastpass doesn't add its elements onto the form inputs. It works with something simpler like <form id="search"> but doesn't work with <form id="se1rch">


15

defaultValue is only for the initial load If you want to initialize the input then you should use defaultValue, but if you want to use state to change the value then you need to use value. Personally I like to just use defaultValue if I'm just initializing it and then just use refs to get the value when I submit. There's more info on refs and inputs on the ...


15

Radio button example using custom RadioControlValueAccessor similar to CheckboxControlValueAccessor (Updated with Angular 2 beta.2) App.ts import {Component, View} from "angular2/core"; import {FORM_DIRECTIVES} from "angular2/common"; import {RadioControlValueAccessor} from "./radio_value_accessor"; import {bootstrap} from "angular2/platform/browser"; ...


15

Selected response is correct, but someone like me, may have issues with async validation with sending request to the server-side - button will be not disabled during given request processing, so button will blink, which looks pretty strange for the users. To void this, you just need to handle $pending state of the form: <form name="myForm"> ...


15

You can keep both ng-click and type="submit". In the ng-click you can just update a parameter of your controller and validate that in the event ng-submit <div ng-controller="SomeController"> <form ng-submit="save(record)"> <input type="text" name="shoppingListItem" ng-model="record.shoppingListItem"> <button ...


14

Elements with Disabled attribute are not submitted or you can say their values are not posted. i.e. <input type="textbox" name="Percentage" value="100" disabled="disabled" /> FYI, Disabled controls do not receive focus. Disabled controls are skipped in tabbing navigation. Disabled controls cannot be successfully posted. You can use readonly ...


12

It depends on what type of UI you want to present to the user. You can simply lower the timeout at the server level and if it can't finish the response in time, it will abort. However, the user experience is pretty harsh, as they'll just get a generic timeout error that likely won't even be from your site. (They'll have to click back or something to get back ...


12

Django 1.9 added the Field.disabled attribute: https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.9/ref/forms/fields/#disabled The disabled boolean argument, when set to True, disables a form field using the disabled HTML attribute so that it won’t be editable by users. Even if a user tampers with the field’s value submitted to the server, it will be ignored in favor ...


11

connectReduxForm wraps your component with another component which handles passing in the fields and handleSubmit props, but you're blowing those away by passing them in yourself. Try this instead (renamed the prop to onSubmit): <ContactForm onSubmit={this.handleSubmit.bind(this)}/> And in ContactForm, pass your own submit handler to the ...


11

I had the same problem, and everyone whas blaming to the poor hidden inputs been required, but seems like a bug having your required field inside a fieldset. Chrome tries to focus (for some unknown reason) your fieldset instead of your required input. This bug is present only in chrome I tested in version 43.0.2357.124 m. Doesn't happen in firefox. Example ...


11

As @Kevin B said above, this is not a job for javascript. Any extra handling or looping should be done in ColdFusion. Basic Loop: Multiple selections will be submitted as a csv list ie form.Meal = "Breakfast,Snacks,Dessert". Simply loop through that list and execute an insert for each meal + name. There are ways to improve this kind of looping, but below ...


11

Here are my proposed solutions, since Google are insisting on overriding every work-around that people seem to make. Option 1 - select all text on click Set the values of the inputs to an example for your user (e.g. your@email.com), or the label of the field (e.g. Email) and add a class called focus-select to your inputs: <input type="text" ...


11

Here's a slightly modified version of TibTibs': function serialize(form) { var field, s = []; if (typeof form == 'object' && form.nodeName == "FORM") { var len = form.elements.length; for (i=0; i<len; i++) { field = form.elements[i]; if (field.name && !field.disabled && field.type != ...


10

Easy, don't put it in your form. So where can you put it? Store it in a session.


10

You need to enclose the userid between cfoutput so that it can be evaluated. Or better just wrap the form inside cfoutput. <cfoutput> <form action="storage.cfm" method="POST"> <input type="hidden" name="userId" value="#userId#"> <label>First Name:</label> <input type="text" name="firstName" ...


10

There’s a new HTML5 approach to this, the formaction attribute: <button type="submit" formaction="/action_one">First action</button> <button type="submit" formaction="/action_two">Second action</button> Apparently this does not work in IE9 and earlier, but for other browsers you should be fine (see: w3schools.com HTML <button> ...


10

Your input doesn't have a name. Only named inputs can be successful.


10

boindiil's directive based solution works but has a flaw: it stops working if form's $setPritine is executed manually. This can be solved by adding an extra line that wipes out the method behavior for the input: angular.module('myApp', []).directive('ignoreDirty', [function() { return { restrict: 'A', require: 'ngModel', link: ...


9

Ooops, the window.scrollTo suggested is kinda lousy and make things unpredictable. Try this better solution: jQuery('body').bind('focusin focus', function(e){ e.preventDefault(); }) Or, just hook your input: jQuery('input.your-input-class').bind('focusin focus', function(e){ e.preventDefault(); }) Why? Browsers may scroll the focused form ...



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