Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

You're using the wrong variable: for(int i = 0; i <= n; i++) ^^^^^ iterating over 'i' But: first_part += (pow(-1, n)) / ((2 * n + 1) * pow(5, 2 * n + 1)); second_part += (pow(-1, n)) / ((2 * n + 1) * pow(239, 2 * n + 1)); ^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^ all operations use 'n'


6

Instead of X = (X - 1) % 5 use X = (X + 4) % 5 which is the short form of X = (X - 1 + 5) % 5 or generally X = (X - 1 + n) % n This ensures that the argument in () is always positive - so the division remainder stays also positive.


4

You reached the limit of floating point accuracy: #include <cmath> #include <iostream> int main() { // This will print inf (infinite) std::cout << std::pow(5.0, 600.0) << "\n"; // pow(5, 2 * n + 1)) return 0; }


4

The <text>:2:10080 is giving you the location of the error. 2nd line, 10080th character. Consider: parse(text="1 + 1 + 2\n a - 3 b") # Error in parse(text = "1 + 1 + 2\n a - 3 b") : # <text>:2:8: unexpected symbol Here, the error is with b, which is an illegal use of a symbol, and you'll note it is the 8th character of the second line. ...


4

You were on the right track with parse and deparse: (lang <- parse(text=deparse(lapply(all.vars(ff), as.name)))[[1]]) # list(Age, q) str(lang) # language list(Age, q)


3

There might be a better way, but this seems to work: > (lang <- do.call("call", c("list", lapply(all.vars(ff), as.name)), quote=TRUE)) list(Age, q) > str(lang) language list(Age, q) Here's an alternative, which might be slightly-cleaner: > (lang <- as.call(c(quote(list), lapply(all.vars(ff), as.name)))) list(Age, q) > str(lang) ...


3

You can do this: `*` <- intersect `+` <- c Be aware that if you do that in the global environment (not a function) it will probably make the rest of your script fail unless you intend for * and + to always do sum and intercept. Other options would be to use S3 methods and classes to restrict that usage. * and + have special meaning within ...


2

Putting your formula into the Online Excel Formula beautifier I notice several problems with your formula: =IF ( ( P5 ) < ’UK Tax Figures’!C3 , 0 , IF( P5 >= ’UK Tax Figures’!C3 < UKTaxFigures!G5, ( ( P5 - UKTaxFigures!C3 ) / 100 ) * 20, IF( P5 >= UKTaxFigures!F5, ( ( H5 / 100 ) * 20 ) + ( ( P5 ...


2

With data in A1 through A12, in C1 enter: =LARGE($A$1:$A$12,ROW()) and copy down through C4 To show fewer items, copy through C3, etc. EDIT#1: Leave the formulas in column C. In column D just enter 1, 2, 3.Then in B1 enter: =IFERROR(VLOOKUP(A1,$C$1:$D$3,2,FALSE),"") and copy down. Here is an example: EDIT#2: In B2 enter: ...


2

Try using chooseZ from the gmp package. library(gmp) chooseZ(1598,999) Big Integer ('bigz') : [1] ...


2

If you can add an additional column, you can add one in that only counts the number if the keyword ("ENDICIA") is found in the cell (otherwise return 0). =IFERROR(IF(FIND("ENDICIA",D1),E1,0),0) From there you just need to sum the column where you put this formula.


2

An alternative way(change the terms of the original call): lang <- attr(terms(ff),"variables") lang[-1] <-lapply(all.vars(ff),as.name) str(lang) language list(Age, q) Another way (it is equivalent to Joshua's second suggestion): lang <- c(quote(list), lapply(all.vars(ff),as.name)) mode(lang) <- "call" str(lang) language list(Age, q)


2

A formula is really just a way to hold an unevaluated expression. You can create an environment where those functions are re-defined and then evaluate that expression in that environment. Here's a function that will do much of that for you. First, your sample input a <- 1:10 b <- 5:15 c <- seq(1, 20, 2) d <- 1:5 Now the function myfun <- ...


2

without VBA: Put your data in A1 through A10 and in B1 enter: =10^(A1/10) and copy down. Then in another cell enter: =10*LOG10(SUM(B1:B10)) You can avoid the "helper" column (column B) by using: =10*LOG10(SUMPRODUCT(10^((A1:A10)/10)))


2

Change your code replacing all n to i in the for loop: #include <iostream> #include <cmath> using namespace std; int main() { long double n; cin >> n; long double first_part = 0.0, second_part = 0.0, pi = 0.0; for(int i = 0; i <= n; i++) { first_part += (pow(-1, i)) / ((2 * i + 1) * pow(5, 2 * i + 1)); ...


1

Delete double quotes ROW(" & R & " : " & R & ") Full: Cells(i + 2, j).FormulaArray = "=IFERROR(INDEX(Sheet2!$A:$B,SMALL(IF(Sheet2!$A:$A=""" & CustomerName & """,ROW(Sheet2!$A:$A)),ROW(" & R & ":" & R & "))*1,2),0)" Example to understand: a = 10 b = "sometext_" & a & "_sometext" ?b in immediate window ...


1

The formula below worked for me. I couldn't tell what recordtype you were running against so I just added a custom date field to the case record called Test Date Field. Just replace the field name with yours and it should work. The key is that {systemnotes.newvalue} returns text so you need to wrap that result in TO_DATE() to convert it. Then you can ...


1

Note that it's actually compiling GCC at that point, which is expected to take a long time. Homebrew does provide pre-built binary bottles by default, so it's curious those aren't being used. Is your environment set to build everything from source? You could try brew install gcc --force-bottle


1

From the example you posted, you want to push A and B down when C is blank? Sub PushDown() Dim X As Long For X = 1 To Range("A" & Rows.Count).End(xlUp).Row If IsEmpty(Range("C" & X)) Then Range("A" & X & ":B" & X).Insert xlDown Next End Sub


1

You can find appropriate formulas in the section Destination point given distance and bearing from start point here Excerpt: Formula: φ2 = asin( sin φ1 ⋅ cos δ + cos φ1 ⋅ sin δ ⋅ cos θ ) λ2 = λ1 + atan2( sin θ ⋅ sin δ ⋅ cos φ1, cos δ − sin φ1 ⋅ sin φ2 ) where φ is latitude, λ is longitude, θ is the bearing (clockwise from north), δ is the angular ...


1

Say we have a lookup table in columns G and H like: We want to enter a word in cell A1 and the appropriate formula appear in cell B1. Enter the following Event macro in the worksheet code area: Private Sub Worksheet_Change(ByVal Target As Range) Dim r As Range If Intersect(Range("A1"), Target) Is Nothing Then Exit Sub Set r = ...


1

First, note the proper syntax for the IF() function: IF(logical_test, value_if_true, [value_if_false]) The logical_test is B2 <= 2. The value_if_true_ is 0. The value_if_false (i.e., if B2 is > 2) is B2 * 25. So the formula is =IF(B2<=2, 0, B2*25). For example (data starting in B2, formula in C2): [B] [C] [2] 0 0 [3] 1 ...


1

Use This function private int dp2px(int dp) { return (int) TypedValue.applyDimension(TypedValue.COMPLEX_UNIT_DIP, dp, getResources().getDisplayMetrics()); }


1

You would have to use wildcards.. please try: =countif('Responses'!B:B,"*"&A2&"*") and see if that works ?


1

With basic algebra you can deduce that you formula is: R=(L/(4*pi*s*T^4))^0.5 (x^0.5 is the square root of x) In js, math functions came from the Math package. To find: -^x, use Math.pow(base,x); -the square root, use Math.sqrt(base); Pi is Math.pi So basically, your function will look like: var s = ...; function R(L, T){ return ...


1

tan, sin, and cos are actually measuring the ratios between two edges of a 3-edged object aka a triangle. Hence in your case, to form that triangle, you will need the lengths of two edges. They are the lengths between y1 and y2, and x1 and x2. That is why you deduct y1 from y2 and x1 from x2. In fact, you have to ensure that the signs are correct too, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible