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3

You can use an Index function to identify which cell to concatenate. For a regular pattern of using every row twice, use =CONCATENATE(INDEX(A:A,ROUNDUP(ROW()/2,0)),", ","some string") Copy down.


3

Well umm... there could be ALL SORTS of solutions to this. Here's an example: for ($i = 1; $i <= 11; $i++) { echo ($i % 4 <= 1 ? 1 : 0) . ' '; } Output: 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 Explanation: divide the number by 4. If the remainder is 0 or 1, then you get a 1, otherwise you get a 0. For reverse-engineering, it's really a matter of trial and ...


3

Yes, you can ensure you recalculate each variable only once (at most), by using the fact that there are no cyclic dependencies (no way a variable x needs y in order to be calculated, and in the same time y also needs x). This is done by modeling the problem as a graph, where all variables are vertices, and a "needed" relation is a directed edge. (So, if ...


2

Enter x in A1, y in B1, in B2: =60*(A2+1) and copy down. Then populate A2 onwards with values of your choice. @Derek kindly provided an example in an answer since deleted for reasons of moderation. Beware however, since, because in Google Spreadsheets, the formulae are not quite the same. Copying the formulae down may be easiest by grabbing the ...


2

First list your candidates in column D starting at D2 Then in E2 enter: =COUNTIF(B$2:B$12,D2)-COUNTIF(C$2:C$12,D2) and copy down. Finally in F2 enter: =INDEX(D:D,MATCH(MAX(E:E),E:E,0)) With your data:


2

This should work: =IF(SUMPRODUCT((MMULT(COUNTIF(OFFSET(B2:B11,,{0,1}),B2:B11),{1;-1})=MAX(MMULT(COUNTIF(OFFSET(B2:B11,,{0,1}),B2:B11),{1;-1})))/COUNTIF(B2:B11,B2:B11&""))>1,"No Favourite",INDEX(B2:B11,MATCH(MAX(MMULT(COUNTIF(OFFSET(B2:B11,,{0,1}),B2:B11),{1;-1})),MMULT(COUNTIF(OFFSET(B2:B11,,{0,1}),B2:B11),{1;-1}),0))) And for non-contiguous, ...


2

You can use this version =INDEX(Database!A1:A100,SMALL(IF((Database!B1:B100>=80%)*(Database!C1:C100="College"),ROW(Database!A1:A100)-MIN(ROW(Database!A1:A100))+1),RANDBETWEEN(1,COUNTIFS(Database!B1:B100,">=80%",Database!C1:C100,"College")))) formula needs to be confirmed with CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER Extra criteria added to the IF function with SMALL and ...


2

If you have Excel 2007 or later: =INDEX(Database!A1:A100,SMALL(IF(Database!B1:B100>=80%,IF(Database!C1:C100="College",ROW(Database!A1:A100)-MIN(ROW(Database!A1:A100))+1)),RANDBETWEEN(1,COUNTIFS(Database!B1:B100,">=80%",Database!C1:C100,"College")))) If not: ...


1

You can retrieve only the data : $objReader = new PHPExcel_Reader_Excel2007(); $objReader->setReadDataOnly(true); $objPHPExcel = $objReader->load("myworkbook.xlsx"); Or you can get the calculated values of cells : $objPHPExcel->getActiveSheet()->getCell("A2")->getCalculatedValue();


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I'm assuming you're are putting that formula in C19 and copying down - also that there might be duplicate suppliers in column B and you only want to list each one once if "inactive"? The problem with your formula is that the COUNTIFS function always returns #VALUE! error because the ranges are differently sized, which isn't allowed in COUNTIFS, this ...


1

Place all the text in A1 and in B1 enter: =LEFT(A1,FIND(",",A1)-1) and in C1 enter: =MID(A1,FIND(",",A1)+1,9999) For example:


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Several hypothesis can be made. Supposing you have two kinds of bonuses, flat and percentage, thus respectively additive and multiplicative bonuses. Let b be the base value, a an additive bonus, m a multiplicative one -- in the way you defined it, thus need to multiply by (m+1). additive bonuses can be applied before multiplicative, as you supposed (a+b) * ...


1

You can use this "array formula", assuming scores are shown as %s =INDEX(Database!A1:A100,SMALL(IF(Database!B1:B100>=80%,ROW(Database!A1:A100)-MIN(ROW(Database!A1:A100))+1),RANDBETWEEN(1,COUNTIF(Database!B1:B100,">=80%")))) Confirmed with CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER The IF function returns only the relative row numbers of the rows where % is >= 80% then SMALL ...


1

Try something like: =IF(AND(SUM(D2:H2)<100,S2=100),SUM(D2:H2)+300,SUM(D2:H2)) Will do the following: If both the sum of d2 to h2 < 100 and s2 = 100, sum d2 to h2 and add 300 If both conditions are not true it will just return the sum of d2 to h2 Think I've got your logic right here but if not/you can't take this and make it work correct me and ...


1

The maximum hypothetical probability is 100%, but if you use real-world data, your model will fit the data in such a way that the predicted y-value for any given value of x will be no higher than the real-world y-value (+/- your model's error term). I wouldn't worry too much about the hypothetical maximum probability as long as my model fit the data ...


1

Keep a list of variables/formulas that needs to be recalculated. Using this list you can see whether all dependencies are up-to-date or not. If this is not the case, you should postpone updating the variable. Going back to your example and lets say var1 changes. First step is to put var in the list and check all depending variables/formulas. These are var2 ...


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The code you used does not work because the cell changing is not the cell with the formula but the sell... being changed :) Here is what you shoud add to the worksheet's module: Private Sub Worksheet_Change(ByVal Target As Range) Dim rDependents As Range Set rDependents = Target.Dependents ' If the cell with the formula is "F160", for ...


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Each region (made up of multiple cities) has a sheet for all of their equipment. That does not sound like good data architecture. As the golden rule, all your data input should be in ONE sheet. Then you can build reports on that data on other sheets. With the info you provide above, it looks like a better data structure might be a sheet with a ...


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Are you trying to make a table of the listed values in sheet2, such that cities will be listed in a column and equipment listed in a row, with an x appearing in a cell where the city and equipmnt exist? If so then add a third column to your data in sheet 2: =A1&B1 for all values in the list, then lookup the two values in each cell in you tabulated data ...


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Think about it like this. How many ways are there to place seq * seq square within row * col rectangle. Teacher gave you that answer. There are two diagonals in any square, so number of what you call diagonals in row * col matrix are just 2 times the value that you get with teachers function.



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