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This is an approach that uses a Helper column that you can adapt to your needs. We place your data in columns A and B and put the validation list cell in E1. In C1 enter: =IF(A1<>$E$1,"",ROW()) and in C2 enter: =IF(A2<>$E$1,"",IF(SUMPRODUCT(($A$1:A1=$E$1)*($B$1:B1=B2))>0,"",1+MAX($C$1:C1))) and copy down. Column C marks the items to ...


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Assuming your data starts in row 1 with no headers, put this in cell A1 and drag/copy down: =COUNTIF(B$1:B1,B1)


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When trying to debug formulas, it might help to add new-lines with Alt+Enter to make them more readable, e.g.: =SUM(--NOT(ISNUMBER( IF(WEEKDAY( DATE($A$2,$A$3,OFFSET($A$5,0,31*($A$3-1)+1,1,31)), 2) <= 6, OFFSET(A8,0,31*($A$3-1)+1,1,31), 0)) ) * --NOT(ISNUMBER( MATCH( ...


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Minhaz, This seems a little overly complex. If you're trying to find out the number of working days in a month without holidays included, have you tried the NETWORKDAYS function? I've used it to help work out Service levels before. Networkdays checks if days are mon-fri, and against a list of holidays you define. For example: Start End working ...


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a formula to add 1 to your week number format looks like this: =YEAR(DATE(LEFT(A2, 4), 1, 1) + MID(A2, 5, 2) * 7) * 100 + WEEKNUM(DATE(LEFT(A2, 4), 1, 1) + MID(A2, 5, 2) * 7) it will create a sequence of week numbers that includes: 201452 => 201453 => 201502 LEFT(A2, 4) and MID(A2, 5, 2) extract the year and week components date(year, 1, 1) + (week - ...


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It seems this is a bug in Excel (at least some versions). Have a look at this link to see if any of these fixes will work for you. http://www.mrexcel.com/forum/excel-questions/382099-conditional-formatting-does-not-refresh.html


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Note that the most circles with radius R contain less than πR² integer points within the boundary, so usually that map doesn't exist. Reference: Gauss circle problem And I suspect that even for good R values there is no simple formula, only iterative aprroach (look at (1) formula in the linked page)


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I take the meaning of your variable as below capacity as the total volume of water it can hold storage as the total volume of water it currently holds inflow as volume of water flowing into the dam per second outflow as volume of water flowing out of the dam per second int flow_rate_difference = 0 ; Long dam_fill_seconds = 0; Long dam_empty_seconds = 0; ...


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You could try using a FILTER() formula to only show the data from today. To do so, write the formula in a new blank sheet as follows: =ARRAYFORMULA(FILTER('Formularsvar 1'!$A$2:$Y;ROUNDDOWN('Formularsvar 1'!$A$2:$A,0)=TODAY())) Hope that helps, Mike


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You may want to use the following formula: =SUM(LEN(<range>)-LEN(SUBSTITUTE(<range>;"text";"")))/LEN("text") Where range is the cell containing the source text and text is what you want to find. For example if you want to find the value 3 in the cell a1 the code will be: =SUM(LEN(A1)-LEN(SUBSTITUTE(A1;3;"")))/LEN("3") and will return 4. ...


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There is no need for VBA. As I suggested in my comments above, add a helper column (Let's say in B) and put the formula mentioned below in cell B2 and pull it down. =IF(COUNTA(C2:F2)=4,"Complete","") Output


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Try the UsedRange property. E.g., ActiveSheet.UsedRange.Columns.Count


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Your mistake is single quotes ('), which means PHP won't interpolate variables inside the string, and you're not breaking out of the string for concatenation. Use double quotes (") without trying to concatenate: "=D{$i}*E{$i}" or concatenate: '=D'.$i.'*E.'$i


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I might have a solution for you. 1)Open the ‘Report’ menu then select ‘Section Expert’ 2)Select the ‘Details’ section from the left hand menu 3)Tick the ‘Suppress No Drill-Down’ option and click on the icon to the right of it and in the formula option put 4)RecordNumber > 1 This should suppress the whole ROW/Record and not just the field. I saw your ...


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First, almost never use the $finalModel object for prediction. Use predict.train. This is one good example of why. There is some inconsistency between how some functions (including randomForest and train) handle dummy variables. Most functions in R that use the formula method will convert factor predictors to dummy variables because their models require ...


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A cheap way of keeping your existing code is to use memoization. Your code is fairly easy to write in a loop, and that should probably be your preferred method in this case, but memoization is good to know about. The idea is to store the results of expensive computations in a cache and later retrieve them to save time (or resources). In the case of your ...


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Recursive solutions are best in those situations that move quickly towards the base case. For example, a binary search gets rid of half the solution space for every recurrence so that you could search four billion items in about thirty-two levels of recursion. Your algorithm to process 25,000 items requires 25,000 stack frames so is probably more suited ...


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Because formulas allow you to use any function, there's no way for R to know what functions will return values equal to other values already in the equation. There is no special coding for poly() that exists. If you want to just include an x and an x^2 term, you could do lm(formula = y ~ x + I(x^2) + z + z:x, data = test) avoiding the use of poly() all ...


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There are likely several ways to do this. Here's one way: Create a query Letters: let Source = { "a" .. "z" } & { "A" .. "Z" } in Source Create a query GetFirstLetterIndex: let Source = (text) => let // For each letter find out where it shows up in the text. If it doesn't show up, we will have a -1 in the list. Make that ...


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You could create a single sheet that performs all the calculations. Then you can provide a drop-down allowing the user to choose the metric they wish to seek, and use a formula to lookup the result of that metric on the calculation sheet.


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Breaking this down into smaller chunks Cost less than 100k, 25%, otherwise 25% of 100k =IF(A1<10000,A1*0.25,25000) Cost over 100k but less than 2m, 20% of the portion between 100k and 2m + the 25% of 100k +IF(AND(A1<2000000,A1>=100000),(A1-100000)*0.2,(IF(A1<100000,0,40000))) Cost over 2m, 12% of the portion over 2m plus the previous ...


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you can try this one which conforms to your conditions: =IF(B3<=100000,B3*0.25,IF(AND(B3>100000,B3<=2000000),B3*0.2,IF(B3>2000000,B3*0.12,"NOT FOUND")))


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You can use simple if statement for the same Please refer to the formula in the address bar below.


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Please confirm if below calculation for hammer price £500,000 are correct. See below screenshot for functions used: I'm still trying to share excel file with you. Can't upload here!!! Excel file with required functions. See instructions to change Hammer Price in file. Hammer Price Excel File


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To handle the bigger number problem, we need to use number 10234573 in more efficient way. We know that for mod, we have: (m*n) mod x = ((m mod x)*(n mod x)) mod x To use the above formula in our calculation: n*(n+1)*((2*n+1))/6 % 10234573 we need to get rid of dividing by 6. We know that to divide a number by 6, we need to divide it to 2 and 3. So ...


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You should use the distributivity property of the modulo over multiplication, so you don't overflow. (ab) % p = ((a%p) (b%p)) %p For 3 numbers, you get (using the above formula) (abc) % p = ((ab) c) % p = ((((a%p) (b%p)) %p) (c%p)) %p So instead of doing the multiplication of the 3 numbers first, then the modulo, take the modulo of each number then ...


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Following this example you could do this: lapply(1:3, function(i){ lm(as.formula(sprintf("y ~ x%i + x4 + x5", i)), a) })


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I think it's a more recent feature, but it works for me: Double clicking the square on the bottom right of the highlighted cell copies the formula of the highlighted cell. Hope it helps.


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Use the CHOOSE function to change your definition. A simple number will toggle your defined name formulas. See http://j-walk.com/ss/excel/eee/eee002.txt for an example.


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Do you want a running total, or just the total? Either way you can use SUMIF with "wildcards" For a simple total of all column B values where column A contains the substring "apple" try this formula =SUMIF(A:A,"*apple*",B:B) If you actually want a running total you can amend that to this version in C1 copied down: =SUMIF(A$1:A1,"*apple*",B$1:B1)


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Say we want the running total of the cells in column A containing the work happy. In B1 enter: =IF(SUBSTITUTE(A1,"happy","")=A1,"",1) and in B2 enter: =IF(SUBSTITUTE(A2,"happy","")=A2,"",1+MAX($B$1:B1)) and copy down:


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Assuming your data is in A1:A7 then you can use the CSE/Array formula: =SUM(IF(ISNUMBER(A1:A7),A1:A7,0)) Enter the formula with Ctrl+Shift+Enter since this is an Array Formula.


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You are indeed missing an INDEX. And INDEX works vertically, horizontally, or both depending on how it's called. Here is a formula that works for the ranges in the pictures. Should be easy to modify. Formula in C5 =CELL("address",INDEX(B2:F2,MATCH(C4,B2:F2,0))) formula results


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To make CELL work you need a cell reference, e.g. CELL("address",C1) The trouble is that MATCH just gives you a number, not a cell reference. Probably the easiest way is to use the ADDRESS function, so a first try might be =ADDRESS(1,MATCH(AU14,C1:AG1,0)+2) That would give you the right answer if AU14 contained 3, but isn't considered to be very good ...


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You can use SUMIF for this, e.g. =SUMIF(A:A,1,B:B) that sums all values in column B where column A = 1


1

Adding to @Ken's answer, you could use a pair of buttons for "Like" and "Unlike" with hide-when formulas. For the paragraph containing the Like button !(@Username = ListOfLikes); For the paragraph containing the Unlike button @Username = ListOfLikes (You don't need to use @IsMember for this, as comparing a scalar string against a list works the same ...


2

Instead of counting the "likes", or incrementing a counter each time the button is pressed, instead save the current user's name to a list and then count the number of users in that list to tell you the number of likes. On click this would be roughly: ListOfLikes := @Unique(ListOfLikes:@UserName); And then to display the count: @Count(ListOfLikes)


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Maybe not the most elegant solution, but this would work : Create 3rd column with formula : =YEAR(A2) & B2 And to get your count use : =COUNTIF(C2:C5; "2014Yes")


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Try this: =SUMPRODUCT(--(YEAR($A$2:$A$5)=2014),--($B$2:$B$5="Yes")) To make it more dynamic, i.e.: get the criteria from the matching row data, change the formula to this: =SUMPRODUCT(--(YEAR($A$2:$A$5)=YEAR(A2)),--($B$2:$B$5=B2)) EDIT: Maybe this is what we need, paste below formula to C2: =SUMPRODUCT(--(YEAR($E$2:$E$5)=A2),--($F$2:$F$5=B2))


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Try this Array Formula (hit CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER): =IF(A$2:A$9="Josh";1)*SUM(IF(B2:B9>0;1);IF(C2:C9>0;1);IF(D2:D9>0;1)) Where the data looks like this Name Status1 Status2 Status3 Josh 1 1 1 Amanda 0 0 0 Josh 1 2 0 Result: 5 If you need more contraints just add them to the first if.


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So, you are given an integer number C and the ratio p:q between two other integer numbers A and B (i.e., A/B = p/q). I will interpret your definition of convenient as requiring that X and Y are both multiple of 5 where X = A / (A+B) * C' Y = B / (A+B) * C' C' is close to C Replacing A/B with p/q we get X = p / (p+q) * C' Y = q / (p+q) * C' Now, in ...


1

You can phrase this as an optimization problem with an L1 (absolute value) objective function. (This is using a cannon to swat a mosquito, but I did it because I wanted to figure out about the L1 optimization.) I used the program glpsol from the GLPK package (open source). Here is my program: param A, integer, >= 0; param B, integer, >= 0; param C, ...


0

This is what we ended up doing: Answer Home Tab > Styles > Conditional Formatting > Manage Rules New Rule Use a formula to determine which cells to format. Enter =MOD(WEEKDAY($A1),2)=0, where column A contains our date values. Format > Fill > Some Colour. Explanation WEEKDAY(date) returns a number between one and seven. MOD(numerator, denominator) ...


1

One way to approach this would be to adjust C so that it absorbs the factor A+B. Then the ratio of A to B would be exact, and X, Y, and C would all be integers. Let D = 5*(A+B), C2 = ceiling(C/((double)D)) * D (round up so you get enough C), X = C2/(A+B)*A, Y = C2/(A+B)*B. If you want the closest value of C, use C2 = round(C/((double)D))*D instead. If ...


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Let's first calculate optimal(float) A and B. It could be Observed that optimal integer solutions are either {floor(A), ceiling(B)} or {ceiling(A), floor(B)}. So we simply try both and chose the answer with less error.


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One way is to make a String from the Array Sub qwerty() ary = Array(1, 2, 3) Dim st As String st = ary(0) & "," & ary(1) & "," & ary(2) Range("A1").Formula = "=SUM(" & st & ")" End Sub


-1

Thank you for your tip about using ranges, I will use it in the future. You suggested the following formula: =IMPORTRANGE("https://docs.google.com/...; A1) It didn't work. I got it to work with the following formula: =IMPORTRANGE("https://docs.google.com/..."; (A1&"!C2:C5"))


0

sure, just try it: =IMPORTRANGE("https://docs.google.com/..., A1) I also recommemnd you use named ranges (google it). this allows you to just type in "week1" into cell A1, instead of something like "Sheet3!A1:B343." Without named ranges any complex spreadsheet will turn your formulas into an indecipherable mess.


1

In addition to previous post, a QUERY() function also seems a good option as it can output a 2D-array, containing the names and the counts in one formula (no need to drag down). As an example, try: =query(A:G, "select A, count(B) where B ='Late' group by A ", 1) If you want to limit the result tho those who had more then 3 late's, you can do: ...


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Debugging mode is Alt + T(ools), (Formula A)U(diting), T(race Precedents). Recording says Selection.ShowPrecedents



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