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For counting each of several students and to allow greater versatility I suggest a pivot table with Student Name for Rows, Late for Values with Summarise by: COUNTA and Late for Filter with Show: Late.


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You can use the COUNTIFS function to get what you are looking for. This formula will count all matches for multiple criteria ranges and criteria (e.g. student name & late). This is the syntax for the formula: COUNTIFS(criteria_range1, criteria1, [criteria_range2, criteria2]…) If you put Mary Love in cell I2, you could then put this in J2. ...


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Place the cell cursor to the first date in your list (here A1 for example) Select "Manage Rules"from the "Conditional Rules" dropdown icon in the dialog box select "New rule", then "Use a formula to determine which cells to format" enter formula as =A1<TODAY()-365 ... and give it a nice "past 1 year" format select "New rule" / "Use a formula ..." again ...


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If i understand you right, i might formulate it something like this. A racing car has an acceleration value and a starting position (track?). Every race consists of a certain amount of laps on a track, where the track has a certain length. At the end of the simulation each car finishes with a certain time in which it completed all necessary laps. I would ...


1

Read this page, particularly this section: Sometimes there is a need to scale the input image in such way it fits into a specified rectangle, i.e. if you have a placeholder (empty rectangle) in which you want to scale any given image. This is a little bit tricky, since you need to check the original aspect ratio, in order to decide which ...


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What you want to do is look something up in a restricted range. What I did was restricting the range so I could use a simple VLOOKUP. What OP asked for was an additional input to use in another formula. ...


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Just use find and replace... Search for "AM" Replace with " AM" Then do the same thing for PM...


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It is doable with just SUMIF, of more general availability: =SUMIF(A:A,1,B:B)


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I had a similar issue when working on a character spreadsheet and the solution I got was to use offset. The format is =offset(a,b,c) where a stands for the cell you want as your placeholder, in your example it would be a2. where b contains the value which will be moved over for rows (I actually have it targeting another cell so when I "level up" I can just ...


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There are various approaches to this. 1) Use the RecordSource builder button on the form you are using, and create a query that brings the 2 tables together on the field that relates them (i.e. EmployeeID, EmployeeNumber, etc.). This may result in a non-editable query which may still work for you though. You'll also want to double click the line connecting ...


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Then try : <property name="measureIndex" not-null="false" type="integer"> <formula>(SELECT IFNULL(MAX(measure.measureIndex),0)+1 from measure WHERE measure.schemaId = schemaId)</formula> </property>


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Assuming 01=Jan-14 is in date format and in C2, F1 contains January 3, 2014 06:00 in date format, available is always paired with received and immediately follows that, and you have concatenated in E2 and copied down: =C2+D2 Then for available please try: =COUNTIFS(B2:B100,"received",E2:E100,"<"&F1,B3:B101,"available",E3:E101,"<"&F1) ...


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For anyone looking for the answer to this: Using the =DATEDIF([B], [Today], "d") formula above in a calculated column will give you the difference in days between the two dates. If you need to further filter only the row with the latest occurrence, you need to configure a view. Grouping by [A], sorting by [C], then use SP Designer to limit the group count to ...


0

Below is another trial. set.seed(1987) myDF <- data.frame(Y = rnorm(100), X1 = factor(LETTERS[sample(1:3, 100, replace = TRUE)]), X2 = factor(LETTERS[sample(1:3, 100, replace = TRUE)])) # row subsetting to exclude A modelMat <- model.matrix(formula(Y ~ X1 : X2), data = myDF[myDF$X1 != 'A',]) # column subsetting to ...


1

Is ~X1:X2-1 what you're looking for? Make test data (as above): set.seed(1987) myDF <- data.frame(Y = rnorm(100), X1 = factor(LETTERS[sample(1:3, 100, replace = TRUE)]), X2 = factor(LETTERS[sample(1:3, 100, replace = TRUE)])) Generate model matrix: mm1 <- model.matrix(formula(Y ~ X1 : X2 - 1), data = myDF) head(mm1) ## ...


0

Your code for readMol has this erroneous test (you even told us) for ")". Your grammar doesn't show a need for such a test, if you are coding (as you are) a recursive descent parser. In fact, you grammar has a odd rule for mol: <mol> ::= <group> | <group><mol> This doesn't work well with recursive descent parsers. You have ...


2

A good solution will depend on what (if anything) is in the intervening columns on row 3. A SUMPRODUCT function can produce some nice results by checking the stagger or offset of the columns but it isn't going to like text put into the intervening cells. =SUMPRODUCT((INDEX(3:3, 1, 4):INDEX(3:3, 1, MATCH(1E+99,3:3 )))*NOT(MOD(COLUMN(INDEX(3:3, 1, ...


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Type = in the cell where your first result will appear (e.g. D1). Click on the first value in the first row. Press + on numpad. Click on the next value in the next row. Repeat steps 4-5 until you reach the last row. Press Enter. You can now select the results-cell (e.g. D1) and click and drag the small button to your lower right, across all the columns. ...


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I left some comments on your sheet regarding using list of items rather than typing in values. I've made a copy of your sheet and can lookup things via model number or product code. I used this in the product code lookup =If(A4>0,vlookup(A4,'Dishwasher Data'!B:I,1,False),vlookup(A7,'Dishwasher Data'!A:I,2,FALSE)) This looks at cell A4, if it has ...


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If your string in A1 always contains two decimal points and you want to remove the first one then use the SUBSTITUTE function in B1 =SUBSTITUTE(A1,".",,1) This looks in A1 (param 1) for the first instance (param 4) of "." (param 2) and replaces it with param 3 which is nothing. If you want to use the result as a number then wrap it in a VALUE function. ...


0

Lets say A1 = 1234.23.45 In cell B1, type = (LEFT(A1, FIND(".", A1) - 1) & MID(A1, FIND(".", A1) + 1, 1000)) * 1 You are concatenating everything to the left of the first decimal with everything to the right of it. Multiplying the result by one coerces the string back to a float.


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Anonymous' solution works if you only need to sum one row. If you need to be able to drag that formula down, consider using a flag in row 2 to identify every 3rd column (like Anonymous did) , and use a sumif formula to add the columns where that flag is present.


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So, I noticed the code that generates these names are deep inside the model.matrix function called as an external C function. I can recover the names built out of a term (with term being an expression/symbol object taken out of the formula itself) using a hack like: names.for.term <- function(term, data, order.as.in=term) { # construct a simple formula ...


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This will do the job: 1) put =SUM(D2:XFD2) in cell D1 2) put =IF(MOD(COLUMN(D3)+2,3)=0,IF(D3="","",D3),"") in all cells from (D2 .. til the end) 3) put your data in D3 .... til the end.


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Yes, and in fact the formula interface has performance issues the larger the number of columns. So in fact the matrix interface is preferred for large column widths. Is there any way I can create the formula dynamically? Sure, you look up the matrix columns either directly by an vector of column-indices, or indirectly by converting a vector of names ...


3

The perpendicular vectors to (x,y) are multiples of (y,-x), but you have (x,-y). You can check when two vectors are perpendicular by the fact that their dot product x1*x2 + y1*y2 is 0. (1,2).(1,-2) = -3. (1,2).(2,-1) = 2-2 = 0. By the way, I don't recommend mixing force and velocity. I would rename what you currently call force to speed.


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Select A:C, HOME, Editing,- Find & Select, Go To Special..., Blanks, OK =, ↑, Ctrl+Enter then copy down the last entries in ColumnsA:C to suit.


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Try doing this. First move your data down one row to give you a empty first row. Then in H2 put this formula: =IF(A2="",H1,A2) Now copy that across two columns and down to the bottom of your data. Then your spreadsheet would look like this: +---+-------+--------------+------------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+--------------+------------+ | ...


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Just select A1:C1 together, and then drag the bottom right cross (fill handle) down to fill in A2:C4. Similarily, select A5:C5 together and fill A6:C7 with data by dragging the cross down again. Alternatively, if you have large range of cells to fill, you can also use the Fill Button in the menu. For example, if you wanted to fill A5:C5 downwards for say ...


0

Slightly convoluted but the below should work for you. You will need to add in the names of your sheet instead of "Sheet1", it essentially works off of the column reference of the cell the formula is placed into, I had it starting in column A. =SUM(INDIRECT("'Sheet1'!"&ADDRESS(1,(((COLUMN()-1)*8)+1))&":"&ADDRESS(1,(COLUMN()*8),1,1)))


3

There's a typo in this line: elseif($d = 0) which is assigning the value 0 to $d instead of comparing it. That means you are always evaluating sqrt(0), which is 0, in your else block. It should be: elseif($d == 0)


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It looks like the calculation is not so hard using the language features described in the reference supplied in the comments to the question. To find the date value of the first day of the next month, use DATE(YEAR(TODAY()), MONTH(TODAY()) + 1, 1) To find the day of week of the first day of the next month, use MOD( DATE(YEAR(TODAY()), MONTH(TODAY()) + 1, ...


0

Surprisingly, it is possible to find the nth occurrence of a given weekday using only mathematical formulas. Below I have included Java code to do the calculation step-by-step. The sequence of formulas can be reduced to one formula by substituting formulas into other formulas. I've output a lot of debugging information so I can keep an eye on the stages of ...


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If you are wanting to keep this out of formulas and store it in code, I believe the below should solve your issue. Worksheet_Change function must be in the same sheet as the drop down to be able to trigger the macro The IsDate function below will make sure there aren't errors if the users doesn't have a date in the 2nd column. The DateAdd function has ...


0

While @Jeanno's answer works for this case, I wanted to point out that you can accomplish the same thing more generally using a lookup table. Items in blue are hard-coded, black are formulas. There are a couple advantages to doing it this way: Extensible: if your criteria suddenly grew from testing two conditions to 3 or more, the IF style statement ...


0

This will work for you. =IF(AND(A1>0,OR(B1="PEN",B1="INT",B1="ADM")),"Refund 1",IF(AND(A1>0,B1="AB"),"Refund 2",IF(AND(A1<0,OR(B1="PEN",B1="INT",B1="ADM")),"Fund 1",IF(AND(A1<0,B1="AB"),"Fund 2"))))


1

=IF(VALUE(RIGHT(A1,8))>11111111,A1,"") this? =IF(AND(VALUE(RIGHT(A1,8))>11111111,VALUE(RIGHT(A1,8))<22222222),A1,"") would be a possible solution for your second question


0

Try this one: Pretty much using nested if statements, not pretty but it gets the job done. This is assuming as you stated the Due date is in B6 and document received is in B7. =IF(B7="",IF(TODAY()=B6-150,"Due Today",IF(TODAY()>B6-150,"Overdue",IF(TODAY()>=B6-155,"Approaching Due Date","Still Have Time"))),"ERROR") Edit: added clarity and code tags. ...


0

when combining IF statements that you want to work in sequence, it's not a simple case of putting commas between each one. If you are sure there will never be a case where more than one of the if statements will return something, then putting the ampersand '&' between each one would work. [& is shorthand for CONCATENATE()] If you are not sure, then ...


2

The following should lookup the value in C2 against the values on the sheet in column A, if it finds a match then it will show it, if it doesn't then it will throw an error which will then return 0 =iferror(vlookup(C2,'Jul-14'!A:B,2,False),0)


0

Read about "Annuity" in finance, precisely the formulas for present value of annuity and future value of annuity. You wouldn't even need to use a for loop. The calculation of compound interest in such cases turns out to be a geometric progression, of which a standard formula can be easily derived. Also, I see that you are adding interest as per the interest ...


1

I've tested with a smaller range of values and the following should work for you. You'll need to replace $A$1:$I$1 with your range. =IFERROR(OFFSET($A$1,0,COUNT($A$1:$I$1)-(COLUMN()*2))&":"&OFFSET($A$1,0,COUNT($A$1:$I$1)-((COLUMN()*2)-1)),IF((COUNT($A$1:$I$1)+1)=(COLUMN()*2),$A$1,"")) Also tested with your full range $A$1:$U$1: ...


1

Your problem is here: principalValue += (principalValue * interestRateValue); You're adding a full year's interest every quarter, when you should be adding just a quarter's interest. You need to scale that interest rate down to get the right rate. Here's an example: class CashFlow { private final double initialDeposit; private final double rate; ...


0

After some brief testing I've come to the conclusion that either you have: miscalculated the value you want ($355,242.18) OR incorrectly asked your question The calculation you've described that you want ($5000 start + $400 monthly contributions for 30 years + interest every 3 months) is found by the code you've provided. The value that it gives ...


0

I would suggest you use a different layout for the default values, to make it easy to use VLOOKUP. Instead of having one column for each person that have multiple spellings of their name, make a table with just two columns. The left column is the alternate spelling, the right column is what you want instead. In your example "John Smith" has 3 alternate ...


0

You question is very similar to a thread found at this link: http://www.mrexcel.com/forum/excel-questions/673515-finding-value-multiple-column-array-returning-column-header-excel-2003-a.html Regarding your specific version of this problem, here is a formula that will work. Note that the formula in B1 is an array formula and must be entered with ...


1

Probably not the shortest solution and won't work in all cases, but works for your example: left, right = equation.split('->') exp = left.strip()[-1] inside = left[1:-3] c2 = re.findall('[A-Z][^A-Z]*', inside) l = [s + exp for s in c2] res =''.join(l) N.B. you can add print statements to better understand each step...


0

Apologies...for each company to have its own SUM use the following =SUMIFS(B:B,A:A,"<=2013",C:C,E1) B - values you want to sum A - year only (as per first answer) C - Company name column E1 (in this case) references the company name eg: E1 - Company 1 E2 - sumOfCompany1 goes here Hope this is more what you're looking for.


0

=SUMIF(A:A,"<=2013",B:B) Assuming Column A contains the year only (do this by using a helper column to seperate the year eg. =text(C1,"YYYY") copy that all the way down (assuming date is in column C) then format the cells as number Column B contains the data you want to sum Criteria <=2013 will sum all values less than 2013 Hope this helps...


0

Install it with brew install ./mongo_old.rb (the leading ./ is special); formulas are Ruby code and are not executable directly.



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