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22

Now what? Where do I start? What do I need to know? Start by learning more programming languages. After learning several languages, buy a book on compilers. There are many. Google will help. It doesn't matter which one you buy. You'll need several. It's okay to read many books. Once you've learned languages and read up on compilers, do the ...


15

This thread covers your exact question. Here is a soup-to-nuts implementation with complete documentation. I wrote a subroutine threaded Forth targeting 68K when I was in college. I defined the runtime environment and dictionary format, then wrote some C code that boot strapped a Macintosh application that loaded a default dictionary, populated some I/O ...


14

I think that Lisp and Forth have some of the easiest naive interpreters. You can choose a simple dynamic language, and the hardest part would be building the parser. For example, a subset of JavaScript might work. The interpreter is basically traversing the AST and doing the operations of each node. In any case, research existing scripting languages that ...


14

You need to understand that Chuck Moore is a little different than you and me. He was trained in an era when mainframe computers consisted of 16 KB or its equivalent in core memory, and he was able to do quite a lot of things with the computers of the time. Perhaps the biggest success for Forth, outside of his OKAD-II chip design package (that's not a ...


13

Forth is indeed amazingly compact! Words without formal parameters (and zero-operand instructions at the hardware - e.g. the GA144) saves a lot. The other main contributor to its compactness is the absolutely relentless factoring of redundant code that the calling convention and concatenative nature affords. I don't know if it qualifies as a non-toy ...


11

factorcode.org, concatenative.org and tinyvid.tv are powered by Furnace, a Factor web server and framework.


11

The same word, AND, is also used for logical and. But the two input values to AND are recommended to be well-formed flags; true and false are represented by two values, bits all set (-1) and bits all unset (0). Other values than these may work as true (as in C), but may lead to subtle errors. All comparison operators return well-formed flags, but for ...


9

This sounds like a job for Lua. It's a small language, designed to be simple to implement There are already several implementations in Java and at least works in progress for Javascript. Its syntax meets your requirements (assignments, infix operators). The work you'd have left is to implement delimited continuations, but you knew that already when you ...


9

PostScript is concatenative, and there's obviously a huge number of applications of PostScript. It's just not a general purpose programming language.


9

The JVM is definitely not language-agnostic, and some languages can't be implemented efficiently on it. The JVM offers no memory addressing operations, for instance, so an implementation of a lower-level language like C would be horribly inefficient. But its set of primitives is capable of supporting many popular languages with features different from ...


9

-1 is all bits set which then has the benefit that words such as and, or, not, ... serve as both logical and bitwise operators (as opposed to say C with &&, ||, !, ... vs. &, |, ~, ...)


8

Tcl. The syntax is about as simple as Lisp, and it has an expr proc for infix arithmetic. It even uses {} for blocks so if you squint just right you can tell people it's a C-like language. It doesn't have infix assignment a=b, but once you start going down the road of general infix notation, languages get really complex really fast, so I'm not sure how ...


7

Fortran - first high level programming language. Simula - first object-oriented language.


7

Win32Forth is really fantastic, as mentioned above. It has a nice integrated development environment and is a pretty modern implementation that seems to match up very well with the standards as well as including some more experimental but widely-accepted features. I use Gforth, but I also use Vim to edit source files. :) Gforth is good and "classic" as far ...


7

A long time ago, I had a book called "Threaded Interpretive Languages", published I think by Byte, that discussed how to implement a Forth-like language (I don't think they ever called it Forth) in Z80 assembly. You may not have a Z80 handy, or want one, but the book might be instructive.


7

This post at comp.lang.forth lists a few "minimal Forths". http://groups.google.com/group/comp.lang.forth/msg/10872cb68edcb526 Why do I know this? My brother, Mikael, wrote #3 and he also wrote a paper about making a "minimal Forth" (in Swedish, though). If I remember correctly he wanted to get a minimal set of operators that could be built in silicon.


7

10 7 SWAP S>D D>F S>D D>F F/ F. 1.4285714 Ok see also: http://forth.sourceforge.net/std/dpans/dpans12.htm


7

NB. rvm's answer relies on a separate floating-point stack, which - although not guaranteed by the standard - is extremely common. On kForth, a system with a unified floating-point stack and two-cell floats, you might write : s>f s>d d>f ; : r/ ( n n -- r ) \ 'r' for floating-point; 'f' for flags, true/false. swap s>f rot s>f f/ ; , ...


7

The Forth approach is to add a separate loop stack alongside the data stack. You then define operations that work with this loop stack. For example: 5 0 DO I . LOOP Will print 0 1 2 3 4 The way this works is: DO moves the index (0) and the control (5) over to the loop stack. I copies the top of the loop stack to the data stack. LOOP increments the ...


7

What is not well understood today is the way Forth anticipated an approach to coding that became popular early in the 21st century in association with agile methods. Specifically: Forth introduced the notion of tiny method coding -- the use of small objects with small methods. You could make a case for Smalltalk and Lisp here too, but in the late 1980s ...


6

If you want interactive testing and are targeting embedded platforms, then Forth is definitely a good candidate. You'll always find a Forth implementation that runs on your target platform. Writing one is not even hard either if need be. Instead of writing glue code specific to your immediate needs, go for a generic purpose Forth to C interface. I use ...


6

I have Charles Turner's Forth TextMate bundle installed (in Sublime Text) and it works nicely. If that's not good enough, perhaps you could extend it with patterns gleaned from the TextPad syntax file. To learn how Sublime Text syntax definitions work, I'd read through Syntax Definitions. I hope that helps!


6

I searched for various file extension on GitHub (plus "dup drop swap"), and this was the result: .fs 4783 hits .fth 1144 .4th 509 .f 398 .fr 143 .4 55 .frt 46 .scr 30 .forth 20 .ft 11 .fb 4 .blk 2 .seq 1 .ans 1 .for 1 .fo 0 If nothing else, this shows there are many file extensions to chose from.


6

500 PICK ...will copy the element 500 levels down the stack to the top of the stack in Forth79.


6

You are right, it seems hard or impossible with just dup, drop, and over. I would guess the i21 probably also has some kind return stack manipulation, so this would work: : swap over 2>r drop 2r> ; Edit: On the GA144, which also doesn't have a native swap, it's implemented as: over push over or or pop Push and pop refer to the return stack, or ...


6

It is not Dictionary, or on the heap - the equivalent of the heap is the dictionary. However, with the severe limitation that it acts more like a stack than a heap - new words are added to the end of the dictionary (allocation by ALLOT and freeing by FORGET or FREE (but freeing all newer words - acting more like multiple POPs)). An implementation can ...


6

Factor, a concatenative language similar to Forth, is gaining wide attention these days. This blog post shares the experience of using Factor in education. Niue, an embeddable language for Java applications was inspired by Forth.


6

Chuck Moore, the man who invented forth, uses a dialect called color forth. He has some interesting projects going on: http://colorforth.com/haypress.htm Haypress Creek supercomputer. It has 9 S40 multi-computer chips, each with 40 c18 computers. Total of 360 computers running at 700 Mips or 250 Gips. Each chip has 3 A/Ds and 3 D/As. Total of 27 of each. ...


6

Some time ago I evaluated 4tH, an implementation of Forth. I think it meets all of your requirements. For instance the compiler is only 61 KB. There is also full support for floating point numbers, important if you want to try to use it for technical/scientific purposes. 4tH runs on most operating systems, including MS-DOS, MS-Windows (both 16 bit and 32 ...



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