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16

The way to do this now is to use the Fortran ISO C Binding on the Fortran side. This is part of the Fortran 2003 language standard and is available in many compilers; it is not specific to gcc. It has been described in many answers on this site. As part of the language standard, it is compiler and platform independent. And you do not need to know about ...


14

You'll need to know the signatures of the functions in the shared object. Do you have the source code, or some reference which explains the function names and argument types? For example, I have this source code (mult.f90): integer function multiply(a, b) integer, intent(in) :: a, b multiply = a * b end function multiply .. and to demonstrate how ...


11

Here's a minimum working example. I used gfortran and wrote the compile commands directly into the setup file. gfunc.f90 module gfunc_module implicit none contains subroutine gfunc(x, n, m, a, b, c) double precision, intent(in) :: x integer, intent(in) :: n, m double precision, dimension(n), intent(in) :: a double precision, dimension(m), ...


9

The way we do it is to use a C_PTR array to point to strings. For example: CHARACTER(LEN=100), DIMENSION(numStrings), TARGET :: stringArray TYPE(C_PTR), DIMENSION(numStrings) :: stringPtrs then we set our strings in stringArray, remembering to null-terminate them such as: DO ns = 1, numStrings stringArray(ns) = "My String"//C_NULL_CHAR ...


9

You can solve your problem by intercepting the call to the exit function from the Fortran runtime. See below. a.out is created with your code and the compilation lines you give. Step 1. Figure out which function is called. Fire up gdb $ gdb ./a.out GNU gdb (GDB) Red Hat Enterprise Linux (7.2-60.el6_4.1) [...] (gdb) break fsub Breakpoint 1 at 0x400888 (gdb) ...


9

The "working" approach in the question is inherently Fortran processor specific. It is a common arrangement on some operating systems due to historical convention, but it is by no means ubiquitous. Within a compiler family, aspects of the calling convention will vary with compile options and have varied with compiler version in a way that may break that ...


8

The Fortran 2003 ISO C Binding provides a portable way to do this. It is implemented in many compilers. Here is example code. #include <stdio.h> void test_mem_alloc ( float ** array ); int main ( void ) { float * array; test_mem_alloc (&array); printf ( "Values are: %f %f\n", array [0], array [1] ); return 0; } and subroutine ...


8

You need to provide an interface body for the C function inside the specification part of the Fortran main program that tells the Fortran compiler that the name addnums is a C function. Something like: INTERFACE SUBROUTINE addnums(a, b) BIND(C) USE, INTRINSIC :: ISO_C_BINDING, ONLY: C_INT IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER(C_INT) :: a, b END SUBROUTINE ...


8

Fortran 2003 introduced C interoperability into the Fortran language. This language feature makes it much easier to write Fortran and C (and hence C++) source that can work together in a portable and robust way. Unless you are prevented from using this level of the language for other reasons, you should very much use this feature. You have an issue with ...


8

Here is a simple example that will let you read Fortran namelists from C. I used the namelist file that you provided in the question, input.txt. Fortran subroutine nmlread_f.f90 (notice the use of ISO_C_BINDING): subroutine namelistRead(n,m,l) bind(c,name='namelistRead') use,intrinsic :: iso_c_binding,only:c_float,c_int implicit none ...


8

Strings of dynamic length are always a bit tricky with the C interaction. A possible solution is to use pointers. First a simple case, where you have to hand over a null-character terminated string to a C-Function. If you really pass the string only in, you have to ensure to finalize it with the c_null_char, thus this direction is pretty straight forward. ...


8

You can make use of the ISO_C_Binding introduced in Fortran 2003 to access C library functionality, this is the cleanest and most portable option you have. The Gfortran documentation has some details on it, as any other vendor manual. There are also some projects aiming to implement interfaces to POSIX for Fortran 90: fortranposix and posix90. But as I said ...


7

Using the Fortran ISO C Binding to use the C library sleep to sleep in units of seconds: module Fortran_Sleep use, intrinsic :: iso_c_binding, only: c_int implicit none interface ! should be unsigned int ... not available in Fortran ! OK until highest bit gets set. function FortSleep (seconds) bind ( C, name="sleep" ) ...


7

You have to declare STAT somehow. If you start to play with dynamic memory allocation, staying in FORTRAN 77 is hopeless. Maybe someone id able to come up with some solution, but this is the smallest change I found possible. It uses Fortran 2003 interoperability with C.(Maybe Cray pointer solution would be shorter, but non-standard) USE ISO_C_BINDING ...


7

The issue resides not in the interface between C++ and Fortran, but rather in the obsolete Fortran implementation. The file drc3jj.f is part of the SLATEC library, which has utility functions that return constants that depend on the machine it's being run on (machine constants). They are defined in files d1mach.f, i1mach.f and r1mach.f. However, since ...


7

There are few issues here that don't let names of the objects match. First, specify in the C++ code that the external functions have the C signature: In test.cpp: extern "C" int Add( int *, int * ); extern "C" int Multiply( int *, int * ); See In C++ source, what is the effect of extern "C"? for more details. In your Fortran code, make the ...


7

Sorry but you are very confusing. What is a Fortran header file ? For instance, you cannot read a Fortran include file using a C compiler ! The two languages are too different. In addition a Fortran include file is almost never an header file comparable to the C's one. I don't know the kind of compiler you are using. But if you have chosen a recent GCC ...


6

After some searching, I found that this is both possible and quite straightforward, using Fortran 2003 and the iso_c_binding intrinsic module; I thought I should document this here. An interface with the bind attribute can still be pure, so it can be referenced within a Fortran procedure which is itself elemental. The following is a short example with the ...


6

Using objdump to look at the symbols, we see 0000000000000000 g O .bss 000000000000000c __mymodule_MOD_aa You need to add bind(C) to your aa variable module myModule use iso_c_binding implicit none real(C_FLOAT), bind(C) :: aa(3) contains subroutine fortranFunction() bind(C) print *,"hello world from Fortran 90" aa(1)=1.0; aa(2)=2.0; aa(3)=3.0; ...


6

You appear to know about iso_c_binding, as you use the tag. Study the Fortran 2003 interoperability with C. Read the tag description and some documentation like http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-4.9.0/gfortran/Interoperability-with-C.html . There is no place in modern Fortran for your trailing underscores and similar stuff. Fortran doesn't have any unsigned ...


5

As far as I know, the standard only demands matching types in the same toolchain. Thus you are better using the C-Compiler from the same vendor. The standard doesn't claim anything about the sizes of the C_ kinds, I think. Edit: Just looked it up in the standard, it is always talking about the companion C-compiler.


5

I think your types for dummy arguments do not conform to the actual arguments in your call. Why do you declare n, inembed, onembed as arrays, when they should be int*, eg. just passed as integer from fortran? Also, are sure that you can interchange int and size_t? I am worried that size_t might be 64 bit and int 32 bit in gcc on your system.


5

If it can be done in FORTRAN 77, it will be compiler and platform specific. The new ISO C Binding of Fortran 2003 provides a standard way of mixing Fortran and C, and any language that follows or can follow the calling conventions of C, such as C++. While formally a part of Fortran 2003, and while there are extremely few Fortran compilers that fully ...


5

In this era the best way to call C from Fortran is to use the ISO C Binding. Your problem is the name mangling that Fortran does by default to avoid collisions with routines of C or standard libraries, typically adding underscores. With the ISO C Binding you can both specify the exact name of the called routine, overriding name mangling, and easily ...


5

Here is an alternative solution that shows how to write Fortran to match the original C of the question. The key is the value qualifier on the declaration. With the Fortran ISO C Binding you match various ways C passes arguments. You can also do away with underscores in routine names ... that's a purpose of the name keyword of bind. The C code without the ...


5

Yes, there is a potential bitness problem. If you want your code to be robust in the face of compiler and platform changes, then there are a number of things that you should do, most of which rely on the C interoperability features of Fortran 2003. These language features are supported by recent gfortran and most actively maintained Fortran compilers. It ...


5

It is a Fortran 2003 feature: "When MODULE is specified, procedure-name_list can only contain module procedures. When MODULE is not specified, procedure-name_list may contain procedure pointers, external procedures, dummy procedures, or module procedures." Your version 11.1 is obsolete, current release is 13, but I am not sure if it is supported now. In ...


5

You can use the Cython debugger which extends gdb with new commands that begin cy. These let you step through Cython code, set breakpoints, inspect locals etc. and still work just like the py commands from GDB's Python mode when you happen to be in a Python frame. There's no Fortran support unfortunately.


5

Yes. Modern Fortran guarantees that Fortran routines can be called from C and vice-a-versa. This is done via the Fortran ISO_C_BINDING. This is part of Fortran 2003 and was widely available as an extension to Fortran 95 compilers. There is documentation in the gfortran manual (Chapters "Mixed-Language Programming" and "Intrinsic Modules".) As a ...


5

I wouldn't worry that much. C compilers also do insert padding into structures, especially when the elements are not multiples of 4 bytes. Much worse would be sequence, but that is something different. Try this equivalent of your derived type in C: #include <stdio.h> #include <stdint.h> #include <complex.h> typedef struct{ int16_t a; ...



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