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11

Write data files in binary, unless you're going to actually be reading the output - and you're not going to be reading a 2.5 million-element array. The reasons for using binary are threefold, in decreasing importance: Accuracy Performance Data size Accuracy concerns may be the most obvious. When you are converting a (binary) floating point number to a ...


10

The form real, dimension(:) :: arr declares an assumed-shape array, while the form real :: arr(*) declares an assumed-size array. And, yes, there are differences between their use. The differences arise because, approximately, the compiler 'knows' the shape of the assumed-shape array but not of the assumed-size array. The extra information ...


9

The trick in these things is to look for common patterns and use existing efficient routines to speed them up. M.S.B is, as usual, completely right that just flipping your indices will give you substantial speedup, although intel's fortran compiler with high optimization will already give you some of that benefit. But let's peel off the m index for a ...


9

Type these two lines in your terminal, direct quote: curl -O http://r.research.att.com/libs/gfortran-4.8.2-darwin13.tar.bz2 sudo tar fvxz gfortran-4.8.2-darwin13.tar.bz2 -C / It will download you the gfortran for Mavericks (which is missing in your system at the moment) and will install it in your system. At least, This solved the same problem for me ...


8

You'd read to the back of your favourite Fortran reference where you'd find the intrinsic function epsilon And, if you think the code you've posted is Fortran you've been misled.


8

Fortran 2003 introduced C interoperability into the Fortran language. This language feature makes it much easier to write Fortran and C (and hence C++) source that can work together in a portable and robust way. Unless you are prevented from using this level of the language for other reasons, you should very much use this feature. You have an issue with ...


8

There are no templates in Fortran and hence no STL. You can try FLIBS for some generic libraries. It generally uses transfer() tricks to achieve generic programming. There is a preprocessor which adds some templates to Fortran and comes with some small STL, you can try that too named PyF95++. If you have access to academic papers through some library, you ...


8

There will be a compile time error when you attempt to access the variable var in your described case. The specific error will look like: Error: Name 'var' at (1) is an ambiguous reference to 'var' from module 'a' Are those variables meant to be globally scoped? You can declare one (or both) of them with private so they are scoped to the module and do ...


8

An unformatted sequential file - which is what you are using, is a record oriented file format. For every record some book-keeping fields are typically written to the file to enable the processor to navigate from record to record. Details may vary from compiler to compiler, but there is a reasonable amount of consistency out there across compilers. ...


8

CEILING and FLOOR do return integer results. However, you are not printing those results: you are printing the variables celix and floorx which are of real type. Those variables are real because of implicit typing. Contrast this with nintx which is indeed an integer variable. List-directed output (the write(*,*) part) has as natural result formatting the ...


7

First up, you have put the format line number into the unit location. I think what you want is more like write(*, 101) tempPOinter%exp Secondly, the advance=no parameter needs to be placed in the write statement, like this: write(*, 101, advance="no") tempPOinter%exp 101 format(1X, A3) You can also put all in one line: write(*, '(1X, A3)', ...


7

You have the basic idea right - you've created the structure, but you're assuming that the double precision value is stored immediately following the integer value, and that generally isn't correct. Hristo's answer that you link to gives a good answer in C. The issue is that the compiler will normally align your data structure fields for you. Most systems ...


7

There's no problem having a function return an array, as with this question and answer: the main issue is that you need the function to be in a module (or contained within the program) so that there's an automatic explicit interface: (Edit to add: or explicitly defining the interface as with Alexander Vogt's answer) module functions contains function ...


7

The implicit statement (including implicit none) applies to a scoping unit. Such a thing is defined as BLOCK construct, derived-type definition, interface body, program unit, or subprogram, excluding all nested scoping units in it Functions and subroutines contained within a module will be subject to an implicit none in the module. External ...


7

The example program is not standard conforming. You are not permitted to change the do variable in any way (F2008 8.1.6.6.2p3), which includes "behind the scenes" tricks using pointers. Consequently anything is possible.


7

In Fortran 2003 any allocatable array can be allocated automatically on assignment. In your case DT%a = demo_fill(3) causes DT%a to be automatically allocated to the shape of the right hand side, which is the result of the function, if it has not been allocated to this shape previously. This behavior is standard, but some compilers do not enable it by ...


7

No, Fortran does not have this operator. However, you could implement a subroutine to do so: elemental subroutine my_incr( var, incr ) implicit none integer,intent(inout) :: var integer,intent(in) :: incr var = var + incr end subroutine Then you could call that in your code: ! ... call my_incr( x, 1 ) ! ... Due to the elemental nature of ...


7

In (typical, static) compiled languages it doesn't matter at all, and has nothing to do with "optimization flags". In such languages, the function names are strictly something used at compile-time to identify things. They are replaced with actual addresses (or offsets) in the final machine code. No name look-up occurs when you call a function in C.


7

I believe that the error-generating construction is forbidden by the language standard, specifically (in the Fortran 2008 version) by C506 on R503. That constraint states An initialization shall not appear if object-name is a dummy argument, a function result, an object in a named common block unless the type declaration is in a block data program ...


6

It's just what the compiler states: Shared DO termination label The nested loop 50 uses the same termination label: DO 50 K = l,(J-l) GSC(K) = 0.0 DO 50 L = 1,N GSC(K) = GSC(K)+Y(N*L+J)*Y(N*L+K) 50 CONTINUE In modern Fortran, you should use separate enddo statements: DO K = l,(J-l) GSC(K) = 0.0 DO L = 1,N GSC(K) = ...


6

The problem with the parameter is only that you can't define the constant array to depend on itself. But you could define the fundamental quantities, and then the whole array including the derived quantities, as so: program foo implicit none real, dimension(2), parameter :: basic = [2.4, 1.4] real, dimension(4), parameter :: all = [basic(1), basic(2), ...


6

It is not necessary to check to presence of an optional dummy argument before passing it as an actual argument to another optional dummy argument. This is allowed by 12.5.2.12 paragraph 4 (ISO/IEC 1539-1 (Draft 7 June 2010) aka Fortran 2008) regarding optional actual arguments that are not present: Except as noted in the list above, it may be supplied ...


6

Oh what a shame that computed go to is frowned upon. No self-respecting Fortran programmer in C21 would write something like ... read(*,*) x go to (3,2,1) x 1 call C() 2 call B() 3 call A() Of course, this executes the calls in the reverse order to that specified in the question, but the question also hints that the ...


6

You appear to know about iso_c_binding, as you use the tag. Study the Fortran 2003 interoperability with C. Read the tag description and some documentation like http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-4.9.0/gfortran/Interoperability-with-C.html . There is no place in modern Fortran for your trailing underscores and similar stuff. Fortran doesn't have any unsigned ...


6

You don't need to implement a hybrid MPI+OpenMP code if it is only for sharing a chunk of data. What you actually have to do is: 1) Split the world communicator into groups that span the same host/node. That is really easy if your MPI library implements MPI-3.0 - all you need to do is call MPI_COMM_SPLIT_TYPE with split_type set to MPI_COMM_TYPE_SHARED: ...


6

You are still not consequently using double precision throughout your code, e.g.: beta = 12.D0*0.0001/(1.D0*( (1.0 - 0.1)**4 )) and many more. If I force the compiler to use double precision as default for floats (for gfortran the compile option is -fdefault-real-8), the result from your code is: 0.00000000000000000000000000000000000 So you ...


6

The "proper" answer is to profile your code and test. As a rule of thumb, how code generation is affected by the recursive keyword in contemporary compilers is mostly about large local arrays. For non-recursive procedures, these can be put in the static data section (.data or.bss, depending on the binary format of your platform), but this obviously doesn't ...


6

intent(inout) and intent(out) are certainly not the same. You have noted why, although you don't draw the correct conclusion. On entering the subroutine useless a is undefined, rather than defined. Having a variable "undefined" means that you cannot rely on a specific behaviour when you reference it. You observed that the variable a had a value 5 but ...


6

Matlab is using double precision by default, you are using single precision floats! They are limited to 7-8 digits... If you use double precision as well, you will get the same precision: program test write(*,*) 'single precision:', tanh(1.0) write(*,*) 'double precision:', tanh(1.0d0) end program Output: single precision: 0.761594176 double ...


6

As stated in lapack documentation the DSYEV can be used for symmetric matrices. DSYEV computes all eigenvalues and, optionally, eigenvectors of a real symmetric matrix A. In the example the matrix A is not symmetric Dimension of the matrix, n= 3 A matrix in full form: 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.35 0.29 0.35 ...



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