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2

The number of digits (in terms of accuracy) is defined by the kind of the variable. It usually is not representable in decimal system using an integer number of digits, as floats are defined to the base 2. See the wikipedia article for details on that topic. Also, if you are using math libraries (e.g. BLAS/LAPACK) to calculate Eigenvalues, you are limited to ...


0

The solution is to include the LAPACK subroutine and dependencies (subroutines that are called by the main one, those called by these, etc.) in a single .f file. This file is not a module or a program unit of any kind, it's just a text file that contains all subroutines in no particular order, one after the other. One must be careful because LAPACK often ...


1

You apply the format specifier to every line, and consequently get a and kon each line... You need to first write a header line, and then the data: write(3,'(a5,1X,a2)') 'k','a' do while (a<b) k = 2*a - b a = a + c write(3, '(E5.1,1X,I2)') k,a end do


0

Probably you need to add these flags when compiling your code: gfortran -g -fbacktrace -ffpe-trap=zero,overflow,underflow youcode.f90 -o run.exe Explanation for compiler flags from gfortran manual: -g to include debug data -fbacktrace Specify that, when a runtime error is encountered or a deadly signal is emitted (segmentation fault, illegal ...


0

There is no way to write 3.6 in base 2 with finite digits. It's 2 + 1 + 1/2 + 1/16 + ... You can, however, hide the rounding error by selecting proper formatting: write(*, '(F11.6)') sum If you want to calculate in higher precision, you could use this: REAL(KIND=8) :: var Or, if you want to be really proper: program numbers_sum implicit none ...


1

Here is a very simple version: It reads the arguments as strings, converts them into ints one after the other, and adds them all up. PROGRAM Argtest IMPLICIT NONE integer*4 nargs,i character arg*80 integer :: total, int_arg nargs = iargc() total = 0 do i = 1,nargs call getarg(i, arg) read(arg, *) int_arg total = total + int_arg end do ...


1

Seems that you need to redirect streams here--so input stream of fortran execution process would be redirected to System.in and output stream to System.out. Just put the following lines: pb.redirectInput(Redirect.INHERIT); pb.redirectOutput(Redirect.INHERIT); before pb.start().


0

The loop do n=1,n ... end do perhaps doesn't do what you think it does. Well, it does, but it does more. At the end of that loop n has (as there has been no early exit from the construct) a value one larger than it had before the loop. You can find discussion of this here. [I'd almost call this question a duplicate of that, but a little explanation ...


3

You could use syn match for this: :syn match fortranDirective "\v!\$\s" This matches !$ with a trailing whitespace (to distinguish it from !$omp).


6

intent(inout) and intent(out) are certainly not the same. You have noted why, although you don't draw the correct conclusion. On entering the subroutine useless a is undefined, rather than defined. Having a variable "undefined" means that you cannot rely on a specific behaviour when you reference it. You observed that the variable a had a value 5 but ...


0

You can see that only two independent threads of execution are possible by doing a data-dependency analysis of your original serial code. It's easiest to think of this as an "outer" and an "inner" part. The "outer" part is the dependence of Y(1:2,i+1) on Y(1:2,i). At each time step, you need to use the values of Y(1:2,i) to calculate Y(1:2,i+1), so it's ...


1

for illustration, here is how to direct access work with a text file: implicit none character*8 x ! create a test file, all lines 8 characters: open(20,file='test.txt') x='12345678' write(20,'(a)')x x='asdfghjk' write(20,'(a)')x x='qwertyui' write(20,'(a)')x close(20) ! open file direct access, note record length is 8+2 because I'm ! stuck on DOS today with ...


1

here is a simple version of what the OP is doing with allocate module altest contains function setarray(n) result(x) implicit none integer, intent(in) :: n integer , allocatable :: x(:) allocate(x(n)) x(1)=1 end function end module program Console6 use altest implicit none integer,allocatable :: m(:) m=setarray(2) write(*,*)'m1',m(1) end program ...


2

There are a couple things wrong with your system call. First, you need a space between copy and the first argument. Second, you need a destination file, not just a folder. Also, you should only be using string concatenaters //, not commas. For example, if you want to copy to a new file name file2.txt, you can use a system call like this: call system ...


0

It looks like you have a C background. Could this be an off-by-one error? When looping in Fortran, the loop index goes all the way to the upper bound. Your Fortran loop: do j=0, num_particles ! ... end do is equivalent to this C loop: for (int j = 0; j <= num_particles; j++) { // ... } Note the <= sign, instead of <. You may want ...


2

This function function readParticles(fp, num_particles) result(parray) integer::fp, num_particles, i type(vector),allocatable::parray(:) allocate(parray(0:num_particles)) do i=0, num_particles read(fp, *) parray(i) end do end function allocates parray with index values 0:num_particles. Unfortunately, and this trips up many a newcomer to ...


0

A segmentation fault normally indicates that your program is trying to access memory that does not belong to it. When you say the error occurs "when I update the particle positions", I take it you mean this line: updateParticle(vfield(INT(FLOOR(parray(j)%x)),INT(FLOOR(parray(j)%y)),INT(FLOOR(parray(j)%z))), parray(j)) An array-bounds violation in that ...


2

gfortran is preventing you from writing non-standard code; it's the language standard which forbids it, not the implementation. If you initialise a character array as you have done then all the entries must have the same length. In your case you would have to pad each shorter entry with enough spaces to make them all equally long. The alternative would be ...


2

What is your compile command? For me, this compiles and runs normally gfortran caller.f90 foo.f90 && ./a.out I0 is an integer indicator, but some items following your WRITE statement are character strings. You can try, for example, 100 FORMAT (3(A, I0, 1X)) where 1X refers to a space. As a note, if formatting is not terribly important and ...


0

It appeared that I need just to change the names of the targets for this two CMakeLists. Thanks for helping.


0

When creating a custom command which should produce an output, you should be using the OUTPUT signature of add_custom_command(), not the TARGET one: function (cm_export_file FILE DEST) get_filename_component(FILENAME "${FILE}" NAME) add_custom_command( OUTPUT "${CMAKE_CURRENT_BINARY_DIR}/${DEST}/${FILENAME}" DEPENDS ...


3

I am pretty sure it was discussed here before, but I cannot find an exact duplicate. You can pass arguments directly as arguments to the program ./program arg1 arg2 you can retrieve the values in the program as character strings in Fortran 2003 using subroutines GET_COMMAND ARGUMENT and COMMAND_ARGUMENT_COUNT. Click on the links to get useful examples. ...


1

And you can use the following procedures to read an environment variable: get_environment_variable https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gfortran/GET_005fENVIRONMENT_005fVARIABLE.html Or read the number and value of the command argument: command_argument_count,get_command_argument. See: ...


2

You can choose between the following possibilities: In bash use export of the variable myvar="example"; export myvar Add them as argument to the fortran call myFortran "${myvar}" Write them to a file and read the file Worst solution, just to mention them all Write it to stdin of fortran program echo "${myvar}" | myFortran


0

In addition to @francescalus 's and @agentp 's answers, be aware that format labels, e.g. 100 FORMAT (I0) should be avoided. Instead, simply include the format within the read, e.g. if you wanted to read an integer that is up to 8 characters wide, READ(*,'(I8)') i. If you have a very lengthy format or a format that you re-use in several lines of code, save ...


2

Using I0 to specify a minimal field width is allowed for output. For input, I0 is not allowed. From Fortran 2008, 10.7.2.1 (6) (my emphasis): On output, with I, B, O, Z, F, and G editing, the specified value of the field width w may be zero. In such cases, the processor selects the smallest positive actual field width that does not result in a field ...


0

HPC Toolkit will not get you the number of function calls. It is a sampling based profiler, not a "log everything" profiler. If you need to know exact function call counts then you will need to instrument the code or use something else that is built to answer your question, like gprof or callgrind (although not easy or fast doing that for HPC applications). ...


3

The posted code has a couple of issues: you need to define all your variables before you execute any other statement. a=5 b=6 c=1 should come after your last variable definition: REAL,ALLOCATABLE,DIMENSION (:,:) :: arr1 You need to quote NO in the WRITE statement: WRITE (*,100,ADVANCE="NO") arr1(i,j) Since you are writing a REAL value, you need ...


2

OK, try this lambda = product(max(spread(x, dim=1, ncopies=size(x)) - & spread(x, dim=2, ncopies=size(x)), eps), dim=2) That's a one-liner. It's also rather wasteful of memory and much less comprehensible than the original.


1

Have you tried it with an implied do-loop in the array creation? something like real, dimension(:), intent(out):: lambda =(/product(x(i)-x, mask=(abs(x(i)-x)>epsilon(eps))), i=1, n/) ... I am not sure about the syntax here, but something like that might work. You might even be able to create the array without calling the subroutine and do it in your main ...


1

Yes, you can shorten this, product can use 2D arrays: You would first need to set up a matrix of the differences: do i=1,n mat(:,i) = x(i) - x enddo or, as a one-liner: forall ( i=1:n ) mat(:,i) = x(i) - x Now you can do the product along the second dimension: lambda = product(mat, dim=2, mask=(abs(mat) > epsilon(eps))) ...


2

When you have read(la(i),'(F5.2)') lat you are asking to read from the unit la(i) (external file) into the character variable lat. This isn't what you want, but is also wrong. This wrongness results in the error message you see: the unit number must be an integer. However, correcting la to integer is not what you want to do. Instead, you want to do an ...


0

The F5.2 format specifies that a real value is being read. lat is a a string of characters. The two are not compatible. The simplest fix is to read to a variable that is real. Alternative, change the format to A (indicating a string), then do an internal read from lat using the F5.2 format.


8

CEILING and FLOOR do return integer results. However, you are not printing those results: you are printing the variables celix and floorx which are of real type. Those variables are real because of implicit typing. Contrast this with nintx which is indeed an integer variable. List-directed output (the write(*,*) part) has as natural result formatting the ...


1

Use the sme way you use for XLIBS and GLIBS in your Makefile BLIBS = -L/path/to/libs -llapack -lblas ... ifeq ($(UNAME),Darwin) 2d_elastostatics_FEM:$(OBJS) $(FCOMP) -g $(OBJS) -o 2d_elastostatics_FEM $(BLIBS) else 2d_elastostatics_FEM:$(OBJS) $(FCOMP) -g -static $(OBJS) -o 2d_elastostatics_FEM $(BLIBS) endif


0

This line is wrong: x = b-((b**2-a)/2*b) b is the initial guess. You don't want to keep going back to the initial guess, you want to use the previous value of x computed. Also you should not write /2*x if you want to divide by 2*x. I think you want the following assignment instead: x = x - ((x**2-a)/(2*x))



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