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Forward declarations are how references to an undefined symbol can be avoided in a statically-typed language. Forward declarations allows the compiler to know the name and type of a symbol without the program defining it previously.

However, forward declarations (when declaring structs and classes) are incomplete, which places special restrictions on what can and cannot be done with a forward declared type.

For example, consider the following case (C++):

class Parent
{
    // ...
    vector<Child> children;
};

class Child
{
    // ...
    Parent *parent;
}; 

When the compiler compiles the definition of parent, it finds a reference to the type Child, which is undefined, causing the compilation to fail.


A forward declaration alleviates this issue:

class Child;
class Parent
{
    // ...
    vector<Child> children;
};


class Child
{
    // ...
    Parent *parent;
}; 

When the forward declaration is added, the compiler is aware that there will be a Child class somewhere later in the program, and compiles successfully.

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