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50

A fragment shader is the same as pixel shader. One main difference is that a vertex shader can manipulate the attributes of vertices. which are the corner points of your polygons. The fragment shader on the other hand takes care of how the pixels between the vertices look. They are interpolated between the defined vertices following specific rules. For ...


21

In vertex shader you have gl_Vertex (or something else if you don't use fixed pipeline) which is the position of a vertex in model coordinates. Multiply the model matrix by gl_Vertex and you'll get the vertex position in world coordinates. Assign this to a varying variable, and then read its value in fragment shader and you'll get the position of the ...


18

This determines how much precision the GPU uses when calculating floats. Highp is high precision, and of course more intensive than mediump (medium precision) and lowp (low precision). Some systems do not support highp at all, which will cause code not to work at all on those systems. On systems that DO support highp, you will see a performance hit, and ...


13

Vertex shader is done on every vertex, while fragment shader is done on every pixel. The fragment shader is applied after vertex shader. More about the shaders GPU pipeline link text


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The fragment shader receives gl_Color and gl_SecondaryColor as vertex attributes. It also gets four varying variables: gl_FrontColor, gl_FrontSecondaryColor, gl_BackColor, and gl_BackSecondaryColor that it can write values to. If you want to pass the original colors straight through, you'd do something like: gl_FrontColor = gl_Color; gl_FrontSecondaryColor ...


13

Can you try this ? float xExponential = pow(xPingPong, 5.0);


10

Nvidia CG Book: Vertex transformation is the first processing stage in the graphics hardware pipeline. Vertex transformation performs a sequence of math operations on each vertex. These operations include transforming the vertex position into a screen position for use by the rasterizer, generating texture coordinates for texturing, and lighting the ...


10

Or you could just divide the z coordinate by the w coordinate, which essentially un-does the perspective projection; giving you your original world coordinates. ie. depth = gl_FragCoord.z / gl_FragCoord.w; Of course, this will only work for non-clipped coordinates.. But who cares about clipped ones anyway?


10

I vote for uniforms. One of the reasons is already explained in your question: uniforms are constants for each vertex/fragment. Other reasons to prefer uniforms against attributes would be: the number of available slots (you are allowed 16 attributes, but many more uniforms) GLSL compilers can optimize uniform value handling less data streaming on long ...


10

I was under the impression that you could render to an offscreen framebuffer, with an attached texture, then use shaders to modify the texture, then use glReadPixels to get the modified data back. This is what I'm trying to do. Ah ok, so you want to feed a texture through a fragment shader to gain a new texture. First of all you have to keep in ...


9

You are still using the old syntax for uniforms var uniforms = { texture1: { type: "t", value: 0, texture: THREE.ImageUtils.loadTexture( "texture.jpg" ) } }; This is the new syntax var uniforms = { texture1: { type: "t", value: THREE.ImageUtils.loadTexture( "texture.jpg" ) } };


9

Your blending mode assumed pre-multiplied alpha, which normally is a great choice. But it requires the RGB values to be multiplied with the alpha value. The alpha value only controls, how much of the background gets added to the incoming fragments in that mode. So to make RGB "fade out" they must be modulated by the alpha value as well. Now when you're ...


8

To combine your vertex color with your texture the way OpenGL ES 1.1 does by default, you’ll want your fragment shader to be: varying lowp vec4 colorVarying; varying mediump vec2 texcoordVarying; uniform sampler2D texture; void main(){ gl_FragColor = texture2D(texture, texcoordVarying) * colorVarying; } Note that GL_MODULATE multiplies the texture by ...


8

What's the relationship between sigma and radius? I think your terms here are interchangeable depending on your implementation. For most glsl implementations of Gaussian blur they use the sigma value to define the amount of blur. In the Gaussian blur definition the radius can be considered the 'blur radius'. These terms are in pixel space. How do I choose ...


7

If you want to do mult-pass rendering, i.e. if you have rendered to the framebuffer and want to to a second render pass where you use the previous rendering than the answer is: Render the first pass to a texture Bind this texture for the second pass Access the privously rendered pixel in the shader Shader code for 3.2: uniform sampler2D mytex; // ...


7

Just binding these textures to the respective units is not enough. You also need to tell the shaders where to take the textures for it's sampler2D uniforms from. This is done by setting the corresponding integer uniform value to the texture unit you want to use: //get uniform locations (either init code or render code) int locTex0 = ...


7

From the OpenGL ES SL 1.0 spec, paragraph 4.1.9 Arrays (p. 24): There is no mechanism for initializing arrays at declaration time from within a shader. Note that this has been intentionally left out. According to this post, the OpenGL ES SL version for OpenGL ES 2 is based on OpenGL SL 1.2. The same paragraph (p. 20) contains: Arrays can have ...


7

All variables meant for reading, i.e. input variables always deliver sensible values. Being an output variable, gl_FragColor is not one of these variables! In this code void main() { if(gl_FragColor == 0) gl_FragColor = vec4(0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0); //Line 107 vec4 newColor = vec4(0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0); The very first thing you do is reading from ...


7

There are a lot of wrong things in your code. Most of your problems come from completely forgetting what space various vectors are in. You cannot meaningfully do computations between vectors that are in different spaces. normal = normalize(transpose(inverse(MV)) * vec4(normal,1)).xyz; By using 1 as the fourth component of the normal, you completely break ...


6

OK, I hope there's nothing wrong with answering your question after over half a year? :) So there are two things to discuss here: a) What should the shader look like You SHOULD transform your normals by the modelview matrix - that's a given. Consider what would happen if you don't - your modelview matrix can contain some kind of rotation. Your cube ...


6

It applies a blur kernel to the image. tc_offset needs to be properly initialized by the application to form a 3x3 area of sampling points around the actual texture coordinate: 0 0 0 0 x 0 0 0 0 (assuming x is the original coordinate). The offset for the upper-left sampling point would be -1/width,-1/height. The offset for the center point ...


6

Branches are very slow on fragment shaders avoid them if possible. Use color_tint_amount of 0 for no tint. Premultiply the color_tint_color and save a multiply per pixel. Make color_tint_amount = 1.0 - color_tint_amount. (so now 1.0 means no gradColor) These shaders and run millions upon millions of times a second, you have to save every cycle you can.


6

I am not an expert in fragment shaders, but I assume the second one would be faster because the entire if statement could be removed at compile time because it is never true. In the first one it can't tell that color_tint is always false until runtime so will need to check that and branch every time. Branches can be expensive, especially on graphics hardware ...


6

Texturing requires derivatives of the texture coordinates passed in. This is because which mip-map to use depends on the variation of the texture coordinates in screen space. if the coordinates vary fast, then it means you're in fact using a large part of the texture on that one fragment (so the mipmap that will get picked is closer to the 1x1 level) ...


6

Fragment shaders take values created by the rasterization after the vertex shader. What you need to do is to create a Texture (very large texture), bind it to a FBO (you can look at OGL's doc for that, it's not very complicated) and render to it. Before the offscreen render, use the glViewPort function to define the rendering width and height. Before this ...


6

What you're trying to do is to select whether each pixel should be lit on a 4x4 grid based on the source alpha. The simplest to do that is to do just that. First initialize a 4x4 texture with the corresponding alphas that are required to have the pixel pass (I picked 1.0 as the alpha for never showing here) 1.0 0.5 1.0 0.1 1.0 1.0 0.9 1.0 1.0 0.3 1.0 0.7 ...


6

Easy solution, the order of the matrix multiplication in the vertex shader needs to be changed to: gl_Position = projectionMatrix * modelViewMatrix * vec4(position, 1.0);


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The GLSL and OpenGL specifications are needlessly confusing in this regard. The OpenGL spec is easier to understand: gl_FragCoord stores the X, Y, and Z components of the window-space vertex position. The X, Y, and Z values are calculated as described for computing the window-space position (though the pixel-center and upper-left origin can modify the X and ...


6

Traditional blending with glBlendFunc can't be replicated in a shader. Blending requires sampling the destination framebuffer before modifying it, which isn't something that can be done on current hardware. Currently you can only pass along a color, and choose one of a limited selection of blending modes (glBlendFunc/glBlendEquation) which will be applied ...


6

As I understand it the rasterization stage of the GL pipeline interpolates vTextureCoords across the triangle face, running the fragment shader on each pixel with the interpolated value.



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