Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

110

Here's an even simpler answer: A Monad is something that "computes" when monadic context is collapsed by join :: m (m a) -> m a (recalling that >>= can be defined as (join .) . flip fmap). This is how Monads carry context through a sequential chain of computations: because at each point in the series, the context from the previous call is collapsed ...


107

Edward Kmett's answer is obviously great. But, it is a bit technical. Here is a perhaps more accessible explanation. Free monads are just a general way of turning functors into monads. That is, given any functor f Free f is a monad. This would not be very useful, except you get a pair of functions liftFree :: Functor f => f a -> Free f a ...


65

A free foo happens to be the simplest thing that satisfies all of the 'foo' laws. That is to say it satisfies exactly the laws necessary to be a foo and nothing extra. A forgetful functor is one that "forgets" part of the structure as it goes from one category to another. Given functors F : D -> C, and G : C -> D, we say F -| G, F is left adjoint to ...


22

A Haskell free monad is a list of functors. Compare: data List a = Nil | Cons a (List a ) data Free f r = Pure r | Free (f (Free f r)) Pure is analogous to Nil and Free is analogous to Cons. A free monad stores a list of functors instead of a list of values. Technically, you could implement free monads using a different data type, but any ...


21

Almost all of them (up to issues involving looping and mfix) but not Cont. Consider the State monad newtype State s a = State (s -> (a,s)) does not look anything like a free monad... but think about State in terms of how you use it get :: m s --or equivalently (s -> m a) -> m a set :: s -> m () --or (s,m a) -> m a runState :: m a -> ...


19

The Free Monad (data structure) is to the Monad (class) like the List (data structure) to the Monoid (class): It is the trivial implementation, where you can decide afterwards how the content will be combined. You probably know what a Monad is and that each Monad needs a specific (Monad-law abiding) implementation of either fmap + join + return or bind + ...


16

This is an answer based off of the paper Data types à la carte, except without type classes. I recommend reading that paper. The trick is that instead of writing interpreters for Bells and Whistles, you define interpreters for their single functor steps, BellsF and WhistlesF, like this: playBellsF :: BellsF (IO a) -> IO a playBellsF (Ring io) = ...


14

As mentioned in the comments, it is frequently desirable to have some abstraction between code and database implementation. You can get much of the same abstraction as a free monad by defining a class for your DB Monad (I've taken a couple liberties here): class (Monad m) => MonadImageDB m where indexImage :: (ImageId, UTCTime) -> Exif -> ...


13

Will this do? instance (Functor f) => Applicative (Free f) where pure = Return Return f <*> as = fmap f as Roll faf <*> as = Roll (fmap (<*> as) faf) The plan is to act only at the leaves of the tree which produces the function, so for Return, we act by applying the function to all the argument values produced by the ...


12

Consider the description of what mfix does: The fixed point of a monadic computation. mfix f executes the action f only once, with the eventual output fed back as the input. The word "executes", in the context of Free, means creating layers of the Functor. Thus, "only once" means that in the result of evaluating mfix f, the values held in Pure ...


11

The other answers have missed how simplefree makes this! :) Currently you have {-# LANGUAGE DeriveFunctor #-} import Control.Monad.Free data FooF x = Foo String x | Bar Int x deriving (Functor) type Foo = Free FooF program :: Free FooF () program = do liftF (Foo "Hello" ()) liftF (Bar 1 ()) liftF (Foo "Bye" ()) printFoo :: Foo ...


10

Gabriel's answer is spot on, but I think it pays to highlight a bit more the thing that makes it all work, which is that the sum of two Functors is also a Functor: -- | Data type to encode the sum of two 'Functor's @f@ and @g@. data Sum f g a = InL (f a) | InR (g a) -- | The 'Sum' of two 'Functor's is also a 'Functor'. instance (Functor f, Functor g) => ...


8

I think a simple concrete example will help. Suppose we have a functor data F a = One a | Two a a | Two' a a | Three Int a a a with the obvious fmap. Then Free F a is the type of trees whose leaves have type a and whose nodes are tagged with One, Two, Two' and Three. One-nodes have one child, Two- and Two'-nodes have two children and Three-nodes have ...


8

I don't know what your definition of retract is, but given retract :: Monad m => Free m a -> m a retract (Pure a) = return a retract (Impure fx) = fx >>= retract and liftF :: Functor f => f a -> Free f a liftF fx = Impure (fmap Pure fx) note that (proofs might be wrong, did them by hand and haven't checked them) retract $ liftF x = ...


8

If your issue is with boilerplate, you won't get around it if you use Free! You will always be stuck with an extra constructor on each level. But on the flip side, if you are using Free, you have a very easy way to generalize recursion over your data structure. You can write this all from scratch, but I used the recursion-schemes package: import ...


7

The link to universal algebra was a good starting point, and after reading up on it a bit everything fell into place. What we're looking for is an F-algebra: type Alg f x = f x -> x for any (endo)functor f. For example, for a Monoid algebra the functor is: data MonoidF m = MEmpty | MAppend m m deriving Functor For any Monoid instance there's the ...


6

Yes, this is correct. The 'base case' for the coinduction is the Pure constructor, and the induction is over levels of nesting of the Free constructor. The complete proofs are -- 1. First functor law -- a. Base case fmap id (Pure a) = Pure (id a) -- Functor instance for Free = Pure a -- definition of id -- b. Inductive case ...


6

You can use my pipes library, which provides higher level abstractions for working with free monads. pipes uses free monads to reify every part of the computation: The Producer of data (i.e. your update) is a free monad The Consumer of data (i.e. your interpreter) is a free monad The Pipe of data (i.e. your logger) is a free monad In fact, they are not ...


5

I tried a bit different approach, which gives at least a partial answer. Since stacking monads can be sometimes problematic, and we know all our monads are constructed from some data type, I tried instead to combine the data types. I feel more comfortable with MonadFree so I used it, but I suppose a similar approach could be used for Operational as well. ...


4

Well, inspired by the MonadFix instance for Maybe, I tried this one (using the following definitions of Free): data Free f a = Pure a | Impure (f (Free f a)) instance (Functor f) => Monad (Free f) where return = Pure Pure x >>= f = f x Impure x >>= f = Impure (fmap (>>= f) x) instance (Functor f) => MonadFix ...


4

Here a very simple solution using the operational package -- the reasonable alternative to free monads. You can just factor the printFoo function into a part that prints the instruction proper and a part that adds the additional information, the standard treatment for code duplication like this. {-# LANGUAGE GADTs #-} import Control.Monad.Operational ...


4

Update: the answer below addresses an earlier version of the question, but is mostly still relevant. First of all, your code isn't going to work as it is. You can either make everything invariant, or go with the variance annotations in the original paper. For the sake of simplicity I'll take the invariant route (see here for a complete example), but I've ...


4

Here's my take using syb (as mentioned on Reddit): {-# LANGUAGE LambdaCase #-} {-# LANGUAGE DeriveFunctor #-} {-# LANGUAGE TemplateHaskell #-} {-# LANGUAGE FlexibleContexts #-} {-# LANGUAGE DeriveDataTypeable #-} module Main where import Prelude hiding (repeat) import Data.Data import Control.Monad (forM_) import Control.Monad.Free import ...


4

Please don't think of zippers, traversals, SYB or lens until you've taken advantage of the standard features of Free. Your execute, optimize and project are just standard free monad recursion schemes which are already available in the package: optimize :: Free Command a -> Free Command a optimize = iterM $ \f -> case f of c@(Repeat n block next) ...


4

There is a principled intuition for this difference. The applicative operator *> evaluates its left argument only for its side effects, and always ignores the result. This is similar (in some cases equivalent) to Haskell's >> function for monads. Here's the source for *>: /** Combine `self` and `fb` according to `Apply[F]` with a function that ...


4

Mandubian is correct, the flatMap of StateT doesn't allow you to bypass stack accumulation because of the creation of the new StateT immediately before calling the wrapped monad's bind (which would be a Free[Function0] in your case). So Trampoline can't help, but the Free Monad over the functor for State is one way to ensure stack safety. We want to go ...


3

Yes, following Luis Casillas answer, here is an implementation in clojure of the Free monad in clojure. (use 'clojure.algo.monads) ;; data Free f r = Free (f (Free f r)) | Pure r (defn pure [v] {:t :pure :v v}) (defn impure [v] {:t :impure :v v }) (defn free-monad [fmap] (letfn [ (fm-result [v] (pure v)) ...


3

It can definitely be done, but a key thing is that the idiomatic Haskell implementation of free monads is based on exploiting the type system to provide a certain kind of modularity and well-formedness guarantees. The idioms used may well not be idiomatic in Clojure, and it might be best to come up with a different sort of implementation. Just look at the ...


3

I don't think it can be done except they way you have. But, I don't think this is unique to reader. Consider the free monad version of writer data WriterF m a = WriterF m a deriving (Functor) type Writer m = Free (WriterF m) obviously, WriterF is isomorphic to writer, but this does behave the way we would expect with the simple algebra algebraWriter ...


3

That is, is the monad instance of a free monad build from a Functor which is also a Monad going to have an equivalent monad instance to the original Monad? No. The free monad over any functor is a monad. Thus, it cannot magically know about the Monad instance when it exists. And it cannot also "guess" it, because the same functor may be made a Monad in ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible