Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

This is an answer based off of the paper Data types à la carte, except without type classes. I recommend reading that paper. The trick is that instead of writing interpreters for Bells and Whistles, you define interpreters for their single functor steps, BellsF and WhistlesF, like this: playBellsF :: BellsF (IO a) -> IO a playBellsF (Ring io) = ...


13

As mentioned in the comments, it is frequently desirable to have some abstraction between code and database implementation. You can get much of the same abstraction as a free monad by defining a class for your DB Monad (I've taken a couple liberties here): class (Monad m) => MonadImageDB m where indexImage :: (ImageId, UTCTime) -> Exif -> ...


13

Will this do? instance (Functor f) => Applicative (Free f) where pure = Return Return f <*> as = fmap f as Roll faf <*> as = Roll (fmap (<*> as) faf) The plan is to act only at the leaves of the tree which produces the function, so for Return, we act by applying the function to all the argument values produced by the ...


10

The other answers have missed how simplefree makes this! :) Currently you have {-# LANGUAGE DeriveFunctor #-} import Control.Monad.Free data FooF x = Foo String x | Bar Int x deriving (Functor) type Foo = Free FooF program :: Free FooF () program = do liftF (Foo "Hello" ()) liftF (Bar 1 ()) liftF (Foo "Bye" ()) printFoo :: Foo ...


10

Gabriel's answer is spot on, but I think it pays to highlight a bit more the thing that makes it all work, which is that the sum of two Functors is also a Functor: -- | Data type to encode the sum of two 'Functor's @f@ and @g@. data Sum f g a = InL (f a) | InR (g a) -- | The 'Sum' of two 'Functor's is also a 'Functor'. instance (Functor f, Functor g) => ...


8

If your issue is with boilerplate, you won't get around it if you use Free! You will always be stuck with an extra constructor on each level. But on the flip side, if you are using Free, you have a very easy way to generalize recursion over your data structure. You can write this all from scratch, but I used the recursion-schemes package: import ...


6

Yes, this is correct. The 'base case' for the coinduction is the Pure constructor, and the induction is over levels of nesting of the Free constructor. The complete proofs are -- 1. First functor law -- a. Base case fmap id (Pure a) = Pure (id a) -- Functor instance for Free = Pure a -- definition of id -- b. Inductive case ...


5

I tried a bit different approach, which gives at least a partial answer. Since stacking monads can be sometimes problematic, and we know all our monads are constructed from some data type, I tried instead to combine the data types. I feel more comfortable with MonadFree so I used it, but I suppose a similar approach could be used for Operational as well. ...


4

Here a very simple solution using the operational package -- the reasonable alternative to free monads. You can just factor the printFoo function into a part that prints the instruction proper and a part that adds the additional information, the standard treatment for code duplication like this. {-# LANGUAGE GADTs #-} import Control.Monad.Operational ...


4

Update: the answer below addresses an earlier version of the question, but is mostly still relevant. First of all, your code isn't going to work as it is. You can either make everything invariant, or go with the variance annotations in the original paper. For the sake of simplicity I'll take the invariant route (see here for a complete example), but I've ...


4

There is a principled intuition for this difference. The applicative operator *> evaluates its left argument only for its side effects, and always ignores the result. This is similar (in some cases equivalent) to Haskell's >> function for monads. Here's the source for *>: /** Combine `self` and `fb` according to `Apply[F]` with a function that ...


4

Please don't think of zippers, traversals, SYB or lens until you've taken advantage of the standard features of Free. Your execute, optimize and project are just standard free monad recursion schemes which are already available in the package: optimize :: Free Command a -> Free Command a optimize = iterM $ \f -> case f of c@(Repeat n block next) ...


4

Here's my take using syb (as mentioned on Reddit): {-# LANGUAGE LambdaCase #-} {-# LANGUAGE DeriveFunctor #-} {-# LANGUAGE TemplateHaskell #-} {-# LANGUAGE FlexibleContexts #-} {-# LANGUAGE DeriveDataTypeable #-} module Main where import Prelude hiding (repeat) import Data.Data import Control.Monad (forM_) import Control.Monad.Free import ...


3

Just to add to the discussion... In StateT, you have: def flatMap[S3, B](f: A => IndexedStateT[F, S2, S3, B])(implicit F: Bind[F]): IndexedStateT[F, S1, S3, B] = IndexedStateT(s => F.bind(apply(s)) { case (s1, a) => f(a)(s1) }) The apply(s) fixes the current state reference in the next state. bind definition interpretes eagerly its ...


2

Are you looking for something like this? Your original code would be {-# LANGUAGE DeriveFunctor #-} import Control.Monad.Free data FooF a = Foo String a | Bar Int a deriving (Functor) type Foo = Free FooF printFoo :: Show a => Foo a -> IO () printFoo (Free (Foo s n)) = print s >> printFoo n printFoo (Free (Bar i n)) = print i >> ...


2

Yes, following Luis Casillas answer, here is an implementation in clojure of the Free monad in clojure. (use 'clojure.algo.monads) ;; data Free f r = Free (f (Free f r)) | Pure r (defn pure [v] {:t :pure :v v}) (defn impure [v] {:t :impure :v v }) (defn free-monad [fmap] (letfn [ (fm-result [v] (pure v)) ...


2

It can definitely be done, but a key thing is that the idiomatic Haskell implementation of free monads is based on exploiting the type system to provide a certain kind of modularity and well-formedness guarantees. The idioms used may well not be idiomatic in Clojure, and it might be best to come up with a different sort of implementation. Just look at the ...


2

Disclaimer: turns out you need Traversable f constraint for MonadTransControl instance. Warning: the instance in this answer does not obey all the laws of MonadTransControl Pragmas and imports {-# LANGUAGE TypeFamilies #-} import qualified Data.Traversable as T import Control.Monad import Control.Monad.Trans import Control.Monad.Trans.Control import ...


1

You can certainly do this easier. There's still some work to be done because it won't perform a full optimization in the first pass, but after two passes it fully optimizes your example program. I'll leave that exercise up to you, but otherwise you can do this very simply with pattern matching on the optimizations you want to make. It's still a bit ...


1

Both things just traverse the structure and accumulate the result of inductive processing. This calls for generalizing the iteration through catamorphism. > newtype Fix f = Fix {unFix :: f (Fix f)} > data N a b x = Z a | S b x deriving (Functor) > type Nat a b = Fix (N a b) > let z = Fix . Z > let s x = Fix . S x > let x = s "blah" $ s ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible