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To the best of my understanding "purity" is defined at the level of semantics while "referentially transparent" can take meaning both syntactically and embedded in lambda calculus substitution rules. Defining either one also leads to a bit of a challenge in that we need to have a robust notion of equality of programs which can be challenging. Finally, it's ...


5

Free variables are simply the variables that are neither locally declared nor passed as parameter. Source : In computer programming, the term free variable refers to variables used in a function that are not local variables nor parameters of that function.1 The term non-local variable is often a synonym in this context. In javascript closures, ...


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Regarding your first point you could consider using the analyze library. With it you can quite easily figure out which dynamic vars are used in an expression: user> (def ^:dynamic *increment* 3) user> (def src '(defn f [x] (+ x *increment*))) user> (def env {:ns {:name 'user} :context :eval}) user> (->> (analyze-one env ...


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In the comments to the OP it has been pointed out by the kind @PasqualCuoq that λ in lambda calculus associates the same as fun in OCaml. That is, the term t in λx.t is evaluated greedily (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lambda_calculus#Notation). What this is means is that (λz.y z) is actually (λz.(y z)), and that the function above is correct, but the ...


3

A free variable is a variable used in some function that its value depends on the context where the function is invoked, called or used. For example, in math terms, z is a free variable because is not bounded to any parameter. x is a bounded variable: f(x) = x * z In programming languages terms, a free variable is determined dynamically at run time ...


2

General idea: bound vs free variables A rule of thumb for free and bound variables is that the value of a free variable affects the value of the expression. For a simple example, if I defined identity x = x and separately said x = 6, it wouldn't change the fact that identity 10 is 10; in identity x = x, the variable x is bound because it just stands for ...


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The Wikipedia definition is incomplete, insofar a pure function may use constants to compute its answer. When we look at increment n = 1+n this is obvious. Perhaps it was not mentioned because it is that obvious. Now the trick in Haskell is that not only top level values and functions are constants, but inside a closure also the variables(!) closed ...


1

Think of a more complex function where n is bound depending on some condition, or not. You don't have to del the name in question, it also happens if the compiler sees an assignment, so the name is local, but the code path is not taken and the name gets never assigned anything. Another stupid example: def f(): def g(x): return x * n if ...


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Let's assume you're talking about free variables in Coq terms: Dealing with an elementary Coq proof (using nothing exterior), what you manipulate is, outside of the proof context, a closed term, i.e. a term with only bound variables. If in proof mode a term ein your goal appears to have a free variable n(meaning the variable n is somewhere in your proof ...


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MVEL's ParserContext can tell you all about the variables organized by locals and inputs. ParserContext ctx = ParserContext.create(); MVEL.analysisCompile("a = 0; b = 0;", ctx); HashMap<String, Class> vars = ctx.getVariables(); assert vars.containsKey("a") && Number.class.isAssignableFrom(vars.get("a")); assert vars.containsKey("b") ...


1

How about this... SpelExpression parseExpression = (SpelExpression) new SpelExpressionParser().parseExpression(expressionString); SpelNode node = parseExpression.getAST(); List<String> vars = getVars(node); ... private List<String> getVars(SpelNode node) { List<String> vars = new ArrayList<String>(); for (int i ...



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