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17

The signature of free is: void free(void *ptr); So if area is a pointer type that is returned by malloc or its cousins, the conversion in free((char *) area ); is pointless. Unless... if the code is really, really old, that is, before ANSI C introduced void * as generic pointer. In that ancient time, char * is used as generic pointer.


15

If someone were storing a pointer to dynamic allocated data in a non-pointer type sanctioned by the standard, i.e. area is declared as intptr_t for example, this casts the non-pointer to a pointer type and allows it to be freed. If area is already a pointer type, this makes no sense at all with any C code written in the last quarter-century.


9

I can think of two reasons for doing it this way round, neither of which seems at all compelling. Reason 1: to guarantee that the reference is set to nil in case an exception is raised The implementation achieves this. If the destructor raises, then the reference is still set to nil. Another way to do so would be with a finally block: try ...


8

Consider in your example after free(ptr) you did following char* ptr = malloc(1); free(ptr) // <-- This will delete the pointer ptr2 = malloc(1) // <-- now you request again now malloc is what it is and can return the same pointer as ptr and if it does and if now you do // if you call me again and if ptr2 == ptr oops! free(ptr) -- your ptr2 is ...


7

It's illegal. The argument of free must be a pointer that is returned by malloc or its cousins, or a null pointer. In your example, p has changed its value by p++.


7

There's a variation on David's second reason that is a little more compelling. Although one might argue that if it applies there are other problems that should be fixed. Reason 3: to ensure event handlers on the same thread can detect that the object is being destroyed Here's a concocted hypothetical example: TOwner.HandleCallback; begin if ...


6

You can easily fix all freeing problems by outsourcing resource management to the compiler: #include <cstdlib> #include <string> #include <vector> struct Element { Element() = default; explicit Element(std::size_t size) : value(size, '\0') { } std::string value; }; struct Container { explicit Container(std::size_t size) ...


6

No, you don't "free the pointer", you free the memory the pointer is pointing at. This should be pretty easy to understand, if you just think about it some more. Consider code like this, which is meant to be a simplified view of what you're asking: void *ptr = malloc(1024); /* Allocate 1024 KB of memory, somewhere. */ void *copy1 = ptr; void *copy2 = ptr; ...


6

This is not just a waste of CPU cycles. Double free() is undefined behaviour, which means that the program is allowed to behave in arbitrary ways. The program might work just fine, or it might blow up in testing, or it might pass all your tests and then blow up in your customer's face, or it might corrupt some data, or it might launch a nuclear strike, etc. ...


6

You're calling free_matrix twice for a and twice for b. For a you allocate memory first and then free it, in that order you do these operations twice; however, for b you allocate then release and then without allocating again, you try to release, which leads to the crash. Calling free to free the memory allocated, doesn't set the pointer pointing to it to ...


5

C11, section 7.22.3.3 says that: [...] Otherwise, if the argument does not match a pointer earlier returned by a memory management function, or if the space has been deallocated by a call to free or realloc, the behavior is undefined.


5

For every malloc you need one free. Nothing is done "automatically" for you. Note that, contrary to your claim, you do not actually have to allocate any memory for bars, just as you don't have to allocate memory for numBars. However, you are allocating memory for *bars. A single star can make a big difference in C...


4

If you want very much to use your while loop then you should write the code the following way char **p; int i; p = malloc(11 * sizeof(char *)); for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) { p[i] = strdup(“hello”); } p[i] = NULL; while (*p) { free(*p++); } Take into account that you need also to free the initial value of p itself. So the correct code with the ...


4

strcat expects that the address you give it points to a valid string, and it will attempt to find the end of that string by looking for a zero byte. Your pointer, however, points into uninitialized memory, and it is undefined behaviour to attempt to read it. Changing malloc to calloc provides you with initialized memory. However, that may be overkill, since ...


3

You should be doing this a sensible way. As others have pointed out, it can be made automatic. Failing that you should clean up in destructors. Failing that, however, and to answer the actual question, the syntax for deleting a new array is: int x = new x[20]; delete [] x; You will of course have to delete everything you new, so you will need to loop ...


3

A good advise: nullify pointer after free. In your case you have undefined behaviour, because computer can allocate memory, which is pointed by ptr, or may not allocate this piece of memory, or this chunk of memory could be added to other chunk of memory during defragmentation, etc. On the other hand, free(NULL) is defined and will do nothing. char* ptr = ...


3

You have two problems: 1) You are using sizeof read in the condition here: for(i = 0; i < sizeof read; i++){ What if the input line wasn't as long as sizeof read ? You should use strlen(read) here. 2) While you allocate enough memory for the string(s), you are not 0-terminating them. You could calloc() to zero-out the entire memory allocated. Since, ...


3

quickSort(out, 0, getSize(sound)-1)


2

The signature of free() in the standard is wrong. It should have been void free(const void *); to be really correct. This has the consequence that you have to upcast a const * when you want to free it without a warning. There is a Linus Torvald rant about on why free() should take a const *.


2

You forgot to malloc space for the null terminator. Change nstr = (char *)malloc(sizeof(char) * strlen(*str)); to nstr = malloc( strlen(*str) + 1 ); Note that casting malloc is a bad idea, and if you are going to malloc and then memset to zero, you could use calloc instead which does just that. There is another bug later in your program. The ...


2

Show us your complete code, specially the maintree struct. It seems like you need to free the maintree variable: free(maintree); However, freeing memory means that the piece of memory you reserved will be available to the O.S again. It doesn't mean you actually set that piece of memory tu NULL. Edit: @MattMcNabb "Typically the memory is not released to ...


2

You're corrupting the heap - everything else is just undefined behaviour. Change: scanf("%s",usr_input); to: scanf("%49s",usr_input); and then you will not be able to overflow your input buffer. Also note that this makes no sense: if(usr_input==NULL) printf("You've entered a large number that isnt supported. Please use at most 5 digits\n"); You ...


2

free() does not set a pointer to NULL. You need to do that yourself.


2

Calling a vector's operator[] with an out-of-range argument results in undefined behavior (UB) so technically anything at all might happen, including what is happening in your case. Once you invoke UB all bets are off; you cannot reason ahead of time about the effects of code that invokes UB. Note that the at() method will do bounds checking and will throw ...


2

I can't tell you why you get a SIGTRAP as you haven't published a minimal example. However, I can tell you how to find out out yourself: Make your program readable. Use one instruction per line. The indent tool is your friend. Sure, that won't fix the bug, but it will make it easier for you to find it. Don't malloc like that. There is no need to cast the ...


1

In hRemember you have: curr->cmmd=(struct token *)malloc(sizeof(struct token)); curr->cmmd=list1; You allocate the memory, and then leak it by assigning a different pointer to ->cmmd right after allocating. You should be copying the memory. Since you aren't, ->cmmd is assigned to the same address as what you free() in the main loop, then after the ...


1

Eclipse with the Android plugin or Android Studio.


1

You did not initialize variable i int i,j,k; So the loop has undefined behaviour for(i;i<a;i++){ ppp[i]=malloc(b*sizeof(int *)); } Also it is not clear whar this part of the function does for( i=0;i<a;i++){ for( j=0;j<b;j++){ free(ppp[i][j]); }} for( i=0;i<a;i++){ free(ppp[i]); } free(ppp); } after return ...


1

I see 2 possible alternatives: Keep a linked list of pointers that you have allocated : filled by memory_alloc and consumed by memory_free. This way you can double-check if what has been passed to memory_free is coherent. The linked-list might be time-consuming: as a compromise you can just store the addresses of the beginning and the end of your memory ...


1

One O(1) solution would be to make the header 8 bytes instead of four; use the extra four bytes to indicate validity. For example, it could be the one's complement of what you store in the other four bytes. So you look at the header and if those extra bytes contain anything other than the one's complement of the first part of the header, you know it's not a ...



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