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2

You're not zero terminating the string you generate in format_name. When you free the string each time through the loop you're likely allocating the same region of memory each time, meaning that the previous key value will still be stored there. When you don't free the memory, malloc has to allocate a new region of memory, and apparently you're getting ...


0

If I understood you correctly you want to check if: You don't reuse memory after freeing it You freed all of the memory It's not possible to do it directly from within language - however there are tools which can help. For example Valgrind can check both of those things (and much more). If you are on Windows tools like UMHD can be helpful but I haven't ...


4

free does not mean that it will actually delete the memory! It will inform to the OS that I don't want this memory any more, use it for some other process! You can certainly continue to use array a after calling free(a) and nothing will stop you. However the results will be completely undefined and unpredictable. It works by luck only. This is a common ...


0

free() will only remove the reference to memory pointed to, by the pointer passed to it. Once a pointer is passed to free() and the free() returns a success(which always is..), the pointer should never be used. To avoid this usage, which is a illegal reference, a pointer variable should always be assigned NULL after it is passed to free().


1

free will not clear the memory for you. It just marks it as available for the OS to reallocate somewhere else. People tend to assign NULL to a pointer after freeing to prevent accidental reuse. If you want to be sure what your code is doing, you could memset the allocated space to a known value before freeing. To be honest, just print out how much data you ...


0

The version of the class in the post appears to be stable, thanks to thoughtful comments. Previous versions of the class reported, in available(), a larger buffer than the actual allocated space and recv() caused the buffer overflow.


3

As Petesh notes in the comments: sequence = (unsigned int *) calloc(0, sizeof(unsigned int) * SEQ_SIZE); That line will allocate 0 elements of some non-zero size. You're likely looking for: sequence = calloc(1, sizeof(unsigned int) * SEQ_SIZE); Which works, but doesn't fix some potential overflow issues. So you should actually write: sequence = ...


2

You allocate strlen(tx)+strlen("DATA ") bytes for concatenation of those two strings - where is the byte for zero terminator? Use strlen(tx)+strlen("DATA ")+1.


2

If you are certain you do not have a memory leak, this could be due to your allocator holding on to freed memory. There can be multiple reasons for this: Your allocator may be anticipating that the memory you have freed will be needed again in the future. This is an attempt to reduce the runtime overhead of allocating memory by removing the need for a ...


4

malloc is a library call. If it has no memory in its own memory pool, it will ask the kernel to associate more memory to the process. malloc for small buffers will use memory from its own pool and free will return the memory to this pool, without actually releasing it to the system, unless the pool becomes too large. malloc for large buffers is implemented ...


0

From the scenario, I think you may write the data exceeded the range of data_ buffer in other place, you may need check the code out of this function. On the other hand, when calling memcpy/memmove, are you sure end variable unit is bytes, do you need change it from end to end*sizeof(value_type)?


4

You seem to be thinking of the 256 bytes of meta-data as a bit-map to track free/in-use on a byte-by-byte basis. I'd consider the following as only one possible alternative: I'd start by treating the 2048-byte heap as a 1024 "chunks" of 2 bytes each. This gives you 2 bits of information for each chunk. You can treat the first of those as signifying whether ...


5

A common way malloc implementations keep track of the size of memory allocations so free knows how big they are is to store the size in the bytes before pointer return by malloc. So say you only need two bytes to store the length, when the caller of malloc requests n bytes of memory, you actually allocate n + 2 bytes. You then store the length in the first ...


9

The strtok function returns a pointer into the string you're tokenizing, and that pointer overwrites the pointer you previously allocate, leading you to lose the pointers to the allocated memory. There are two solutions: Don't allocate memory (and don't free), or copy into the allocated memory.


0

No it is not. Though doing so will probably prevent warning errors given by your compiler. free(void *); The function free will free any memory that is allocated with malloc. All it needs for that is the memory address returned by malloc. So as long as np->defn has a memory value that was returned by malloc you should be fine.


4

C11 : 7.22.3.3 The free function Synopsis #include <stdlib.h> void free(void *ptr); It means that it can take pointer to any type (void * is a generic pointer type). No need to cast the argument to void *.


1

Change this statement map = (char**) malloc (height* sizeof(**map)); to map = (char**) malloc (height* sizeof( *map)); And correspondingly this statement for ( i = 0; i < height; i++){ map[i] = (char*) malloc(width * sizeof(*map)); } to for ( i = 0; i < height; i++){ map[i] = (char*) malloc(width * sizeof(**map)); } Expression ...


0

It's a buffer overrun because strlen(a[0]) + 1 > 10. You need to allocate more than 10 characters for b[0], specifically at least strlen(a[0]) + 1.


0

The error is this line: strcpy(b[0], *a); You allocate 10 bytes for b[0], but you copy 13 bytes, thereby writing beyond the end of the allocated memory.


0

When you execute this line, strcpy(b[0], *a); you are writing over memory that you were not supposed to use. That leads to undefined behavior. Some environments store useful information at the end of the allocated block of memory. By writing over that memory, you have destroyed that useful information.


1

The string "Hello Again!" is 13 characters long (including the terminating \0). The memory you allocate for it is not enough (you allocate just 10 chars), so when calling strcpy you are overwriting past the allocated memory, and probably overwriting the memory location used by the library to keep track of allocations. The next time that the library will ...


0

For each b[i], you only allocate space for 10 chars, but the strcpy copies the string "Hello Again!", which is certainly more than 10 chars. This is undefined behavior.


0

This d2 = right; is an ill-formed expression statement. d2 is a pointer. right is an integer. It is illegal to assign integer values to pointers (unless the integer is a zero constant). It is an "error" in C language. It won't compile in a pedantic C compiler. Any compliant compiler is required to issue a diagnostic message for this assignment. GCC ...


2

Here printf("%d\n", d2); You pass a pointer to a %d format specifier which results in undefined behaviour. And here d2 = right; you overwrite the variable holding the address of the dynamic memory allocated when you called malloc. Hence free(d2); attempts to free something that was not allocated with malloc. That results in undefined behaviour. ...


2

d2 is a pointer, not an enum. You cannot assign an enum value to it. It should be *d2 = right; This dereferences the pointer and you're putting right into the memory pointed to by the d2. The way you do it overwrites the pointer itself. You should also check the return value of malloc before using it to make sure it's a valid pointer. d2 = ...


1

free does not alter the value in the pointer so the address before and after free will always be the same. You need to set it to NULL explicitly if this is what you want. The data in the pointed address may or may not change between free and printf. This behaviour is undefined and accessing a dangling pointer is wrong. Also, you are not allocating ...


2

free() does not reset the pointer back to NULL. It is your responsibility to ensure that you don't dereference it after it's been freed. If you do, that's undefined behaviour. I can see two cases on undefined behaviour in your program: 1 - here you are writing past the allocated memory: strcpy(ptr,"data structure"); /* UNDEFINED BEHAVIOUR */ 2 - here ...


2

After freeing the memory also the pointer still points to the same memory location. It is called Dangling Pointer. To avoid dangling pointer, Make pointer to null after free- free(ptr); ptr = NULL; // Fix printf("\n *ptr=%s \n add=%u",ptr,ptr);


0

I figured out what was wrong. I was passing my object as a copy through a method, and it kept the char* across; when the function exited, that temporary object got deleted, freeing the char*. Now I need the char* after the method exited, but that's gone now. Two *'s and minus one fixed it.


2

After reading through yoiur question, here are a few suggestions: In the code: for(i=0;i<420;i++) { for(j=0;j<380;j++) { raf09_grid.grid[i][j]=0.0; } you are looping i and j for 420 and 380, while you've defined : int nbElLat=381; int nbElLon=421; So, you never process the 420th iteration for the Longitudes. The same with missing ...


2

Valgrind is an invaluable tool in tracing memory leaks. Compiling your source code with debug information, and running it with: valgrind --leak-check=full -v ./a.out will give the following summary: ==7033== HEAP SUMMARY: ==7033== in use at exit: 1,283,208,000 bytes in 421,000 blocks ==7033== total heap usage: 422,000 allocs, 1,000 frees, ...


1

your for loop uses lonSize as a parameter, but it doesn't get updated anywhere


1

In order to properly deallocate a_val you will need first a for-loop to free/deallocate the char arrays allocated previously and then free the double pointer (i.e., a_val). Otherwise you will create a memory leak since the memory pointed by elements/pointers of a_val will be unreferenced/orphaned: char** a_val = get_values(&dictionary, "a"); ... for(int ...


0

I think the problem in the loop is the <= which really should be <. Consequently the loop goes round one time too many and corrupts the next item on the heap!


1

try this void saveHistory(const char *input){ size_t size = strlen(input)+1; history = realloc(history, sizeof(*history)*(historycounter+1)); history[historycounter] = malloc(size); memcpy(history[historycounter], input, size); historycounter++; }


0

memset changes the contents at the memory address. It does not alter whether the memory is allocated/deallocated. free does not change the contents at the memory address. It deallocates the block of memory which makes it available for the program to reclaim and reuse. Therefore any pointers to this block become invalid and trying to access the memory ...


2

Both approaches are incorrect, but somewhat complementary. memset will set the content of the buffer to the given value, 0 in your case. This will change the value of the pointers, which will cause you to lose the references to the allocated buffers (in each A[i]). free(A) will release the buffer pointed by A, but this buffer contains pointers, and each of ...


0

free deallocates the memory, which means A would still be pointing to the same memory location, which is invalid now. memset will set the memory currently pointed to by A, to whatever you want.


3

The difference is that memset actually sets the value of a block of memory, while free returns the memory for use by the operating system. By analogy using physical things, memset(beer, 0, 6) applied to a six-pack of beer would apply the value of '0' to all six members of the array beer, while free(beer) would be the equivalent of giving the six-pack away ...


5

The memset function sets an area of memory to the requested value. Do note that the size you provide is the number of bytes. The free function releases the allocated memory so it can't be used anymore.


0

It took about two weeks ... apparently this is normal


-1

Because that free space is an extended partition, right click again on that(free space) and delete partition, it will become black(boundary only)... then you can extends it in c:



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