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0

This kind of line: bridge_text = north; does not copy the text string in north[] to the char array bridge_text[]. it only copies pointers.. suggest: strcpy( bridge_text, north ); in the current code, the malloc'd pointer in bridge_text is being overlayed by the assignment statements. That is why the free() causes an abort. suggest using ...


4

Since you are exiting the program in case of allocation failure, therefore no harm in doing this. You can use second snippet. C does not provide direct support for error handling, aka exception handling. On MSVC you can try this (Note that this is not the part of C standard): void exceptionExample() { int *p = NULL; __try { p = ...


0

bridge_text is declared as char *. This is not a string class as other languages have - it is simply a pointer to some memory that is to be read as a sequence of chars. By assigning other values to bridge_text you have lost its original value (and therefore leaked the memory you malloc'd) and pointed it at another part of memory. This is why your program ...


2

In your comments you have: /*not shown: char north[] = "NORTH";*/ Then you do: bridge_text = north; meaning you are storing address of north in bridge_text. Then you try to free(bridge_text) - which means you try to free north - but you can't do that, you can only free data allocated using malloc, this is not the case with north. When you malloc ...


2

While doing bridge_text = north; and simmilar assignments, you're overwriting the actual pointer returned by malloc(). Now, calling free() with non-dynamically allocated pointer (memory) is undefined behaviour. If you want, you can refer this answer for details. Actually, to copy the content to already allocated memory, you can (and should) use ...


0

You cannot call free() on a non-dynamically allocated pointer. What you malloc()'d is lost when you do bridge_text = north;


3

Problems sizeof(LEN+1) will evaluate to size of an integer Dynamically allocated memory is lost when string is assigned Change bridge_text = malloc(sizeof(LEN+1)); to bridge_text = malloc(LEN + 1); and instead of assigning bridge_text = north, use strcpy strcpy(bridge_text, north);


0

how about d3.js,it's a very powerful charting library,and website : http://d3js.org/


0

Use a std::string and avoid all of the complications you're facing here. I have to guess at a lot of the code you haven't shown, but: struct Employee { std::string book_name; }; class Hello { private: Employee emp; public: const std::string& getBook() const { return emp.book_name; } void setBook(const std::string& ...


0

You just set it to NULL after calling free(), but note that any other pointer variables holding that address won't be affected. You can get over this dilemma using smart pointers instead of raw pointers (std::shared_ptr along with std::weak_ptr in particular).


0

The signature of calloc is the following: void* calloc (size_t num, size_t size); So, assuming stringcount is the actual amount, you should call it with different arguments, eg calloc(sizeof(char*), node->stringcount +1) In any case there is another useful function in stdlib which is realloc, this allows you to resize directly the allocated memory ...


0

Your buffer is too small - you forgot to add the space for an extra element. The fist function line should read: int currentBufferSize = (node->stringcount + 1) * sizeof(char*);


4

Working backwards: The final error is easy. I think you intend ret to be an array of char * that is zero terminated. But you allocate it like this: ret = (char **)ft_mal(sizeof(*ret) * i + 1); If you want one more entry for the terminating null you need i + 1 entries of size *ret, i.e. ret = (char **)ft_mal(sizeof(*ret) * (i + 1)); The preceding error ...


1

You may want to look into using safe pointers provided in C++11. They do many good things, but for you the best use would be to take care of memory deallocation for you. This is the library that you will need to use. From the little information that you have shared makes me believe that Shared Pointer is what you are looking for (but do look at other ...


0

My doubt is : Are memory sections pointed by those pointers actually getting freed? And How to know while debugging if memory sections are freed after we execute free()? You can't know if pointer was freed. You can set pointer to NULL after you free it. This way at least you will avoid problems which arise when trying to free pointer twice. Also ...


2

The problem is this loop: for (int j = 0; j < y_num; j++) and this line of code: (*y_res)[i][j + 1] = y_n[j] Either your loop needs to be j < y_num - 1 or your expression should use [j]. Otherwise, you are stepping past the end of the y_res array. When you do that, you are overwriting the malloc header for the y_n allocation which is why free() ...


0

There are several problems in your code, Unnecessary } after line COEF = malloc(lengthoffilter*sizeof(float));. for (j = 0; j <= lengthofpatient; j++). This will loop once more than required. The same for the i loop. pmg mentioned it in the comment. temp += SIGNAL[j - i] * COEF[i]; will not give you the desired outcome, as you do not initialized both ...


2

Your passwd class has an implicitly defined copy constructor. If you don't explicitly create a constructor that looks a bit like passwd(const passwd &other) then the compiler with automatically generate one which simply copies all the members. So when you do passwd x=p; then you effectively do x.pwd = p.pwd;. As a result, when the second passwd ...


1

The other comments and answers already pointed out what is not ok. So I skip it (fscanf(...), free, etc.). The corrected version. #include<stdio.h> #include<stdlib.h> #include<malloc.h> void input(FILE *fp, int **a, int m) { int i, j; for (i = 0; i < m; i++) { for (j = 0; j < m; j++) { fscanf(fp, "%d\n", ...


1

There are several issues here, but to directly answer your question, you are not providing an address to fscanf() where it will store the integer it finds. Without knowing your intent, I'll give an example: fscanf( fp, "%d\n", &(a[i]) ); That says the ith element of array a is the one to be (over)written. So if a[i] is an int pointer, you might pass ...


0

There are various approaches to memory management. For example, you can find an explanation to some of them in the wikipedia. I'm used to see dlmalloc around, but obviously there are many other techniques. In any case, all techniques needs scafdolding, and also some of them try to guess the next moves about memory management by the programmer, so the only ...


2

The second loop does not index correctly for tau. You are defining indexing for tau as #define tau(a, b) tau[b+a*NrSensor] Let us walk through the second loop assuming NrSensor = 10 and len_zr = 5. For this case max value of loop variable i is 9 and max value of loop variable j is 4. Now, tau(9,4) => tau[4+9*10] => tau[94]. But you are ...


1

The documentation for HeapFree says: hHeap [in] A handle to the heap whose memory block is to be freed. This handle is returned by either the HeapCreate or GetProcessHeap function. You must pass a valid heap handle. NULL is not a valid heap handle (both HeapCreate and GetProcessHeap indicate failure by returning NULL). If you do not pass a valid ...


1

There are multiple problems in your code: function getline: the string in the line buffer is not properly '\0' terminated at the end of the do / while loop. It does not free the line buffer upon end of file, hence memory leak. It does not return a partial line at end of file if the file does not end with a '\n'. neither malloc not realloc return values ...


0

I found the problem. After the recursive call to freetree I attempt to free the same memory again in the form of free(root->left) and free(root->right). I feel a bit silly now.


0

You aren't allocating the correct amount of memory in insertnode() and insertbranch(). You need to replace this: new = malloc(sizeof(new)); With: new = malloc(sizeof(*new)); This is because new is a pointer. With malloc(sizeof(new)), you're only allocating space to store a pointer, rather than the necessary space to store the contents of your struct. ...


1

Every time you are creating your string, you are not appending a null terminator, which causes the error. So change this: for(j=0; j<rem_len; j++) { if(j != i) { remaining_for_next[index_4_next] = remaining[j]; index_4_next++; } } to this: for(j=0; j<rem_len; j++) { if(j != i) { remaining_for_next[index_4_next] = remaining[j]; ...


2

I haven't gone through everything with a fine-toothed comb but I believe the remaining_for_next string will have no null character termination. You're using strlen() which doesn't include the null character in the string length and then copying the string as if it were an array of characters. It might be a place to begin searching. I'd imagine the first time ...


0

In sup_read(), you have: uint8_t *rx_buff = (uint8_t *) malloc(1500); int exit = 1; int length = 0; while (exit) { length = recvfrom(s, rx_buff, 65535, 0, NULL, NULL); You allocate 1500 bytes, but you tell recvfrom() that it has 65535 bytes to play with. That could be a part of your problem. If it is the problem, running with valgrind or something ...


1

one way is to create a new string and use only space required and copy the content to this one. now you can free the previous one. I will use this is realloc() is not allowed (sometimes in homework) the other way is realloc() as others suggested.


2

You can only free a pointer that is the result of malloc or realloc. You can't reduce the size of an allocation by freeing at an arbitrary offset from it. But you can realloc it to a smaller size: realloc(*str, lsi).


0

You can use standard C function realloc declared in header <stdlib.h> For example char *s = malloc( 100 ); strcpy( s, "Hello world" ); char *p = realloc( s, strlen( s ) + 1 ); if ( p != NULL ) s = p; Here is a demonstrative program #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <string.h> int main( void ) { char *s = ...


5

No, you can only free() pointers that have been returned by malloc(). You want to use realloc() to change the allocated memory size to a smaller (as well as larger) size. The contents of the array will be preserved. Example: #include <stdlib.h> int main() { char *str = malloc(100); ... str = realloc(str, 50); ... free(str); } ...


0

First of all, in your MallocFunction you are assigning an address to an integer variable. Depending on the address length of the machine your code was compiled for, the address might be cut off (32 bit versus 64 bit). Secondly, you are using a local variable (mem) to save the allocated address. This variable will lose it's scope after the function finishes. ...


0

I suppose the problem is in "strcpy(*indexFileName, database);" instruction, it should be strcpy(indexFileName, database);


0

This *indexFileName = (char *)malloc( len *sizeof(char) + 1); must be *indexFileName = (char *)malloc( len *sizeof(char) + 5); due to the extention adding with strcat(*indexFileName, ".ind")


2

You code is having issue in the below line strcat(*indexFileName, ".ind") the destination buffer at *indexFileName is having insufficient memory to hold the concatenated string. Hence it invokes undefined behaviour. From the man page of strcat() ... If dest (destination buffer) is not large enough, program behaviour is unpredictable; So, once it ...


2

In multithreading, you cannot make guarantees on the order of execution of threads unless they are synchronized. In your case, there are chances of thread de-allocating the memory before another thread allocates it. The code snippet will help further examining the issue.


0

I decided to use sysinfo after all. Polling each X seconds in a separate waiting thread. And nice -15 is always nice to use.. :)


0

I'd consider wrapping ogg_stream_state with a shared_ptr with custom destructor. class OggStreamState { public: shared_ptr<ogg_stream_state> state; OggStreamState() : state(new ogg_stream_state, &ogg_stream_clear) {} }; Your code would now look like this: OggStreamState os; ...


0

In a real-world scenario you most likely want some kind of custom wrapper around the C functions, to encapsulate them and to dodge C like behavior and oddities such as calling convention. In the real world, I don't believe you can treat any C code as "a generic C API" and design some template class which can handle all possible C APIs. There are far too ...


2

Using C++ Templates you can do it easily: template<typename ARG, typename RET> class Destroyer { public: typedef RET (*DestoyerFn)(ARG*); Destroyer(DestoyerFn destroyer_fn, ARG* object_ptr) { objectPointer = object_ptr; destroyerFn = destroyer_fn;} ~Destroyer() { if(destroyerFn && objectPointer) ...


0

Taken from the book: Understanding and Using C Pointers When memory is allocated, additional information is stored as part of a data structure maintained by the heap manager. This information includes, among other things, the block’s size, and is typically placed immediately adjacent to the allocated block.


0

Just for the sake of completeness I want to add my version of DeleteTree void DeleteTree(NODE *T) { if(T != NULL) { DeleteTree(T->rightbrothers); DeleteTree(T->leftchild); free(T); } } I think it is much less obscure and much easier to read. Basically it solves the issue in DeleteTree but through eliminating the loop. Since we free ...


-2

free() is not obliged to zero the memory, but for security reasons it is desirable to do so, as otherwise another process which is later allocated the same block of memory would have access to potentially sensitive data. So while the behaviour is strictly undefined, I would guess that most modern systems - aiming to be secure - will zero out the memory.


20

There's no single definitive answer to your question. Firstly, the external behavior of a freed block will depend on whether it was released to the system or stored as a free block in the internal memory pool of the process or C runtime library. In modern OSes the memory "returned to the system" will become inaccessible to your program, which means that ...


5

As others pointed out, you are not allowed to do anything with a freed pointer (else that is the dreaded undefined behavior, which you should always avoid, see this). In practice, I recommend never coding simply free(ptr); but always coding free(ptr), ptr=NULL; (since practically speaking this helps a lot to catch some bugs, except double frees) If ...


8

Is free() zeroing out memory? No. The glibc malloc implementation may overwrite up to four times the size of a pointer of the former user data for internal housekeeping data. The details: The following is the malloc_chunk structure of glibc: struct malloc_chunk { INTERNAL_SIZE_T prev_size; /* Size of previous chunk (if free). */ ...


7

There is another pitfall you might have not known actually, here: free(pointer); printf("After free(): %p \n", pointer); Even just reading the value of pointer after you free it is undefined behaviour, because the pointer becomes indeterminate. Of course dereferencing the freed pointer - like in below example - is also not allowed: free(pointer); ...


2

free() can actually return memory to the operating system and make the process smaller. Usually, all it can do is allow a later call to malloc to reuse the space. In the meantime, the space remains in your program as part of a free-list used internally by malloc.



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