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21

This streaming algorithm instantiates the following framework. Find a randomized streaming algorithm whose output (as a random variable) has the desired expectation but usually high variance (i.e., noise). To reduce the variance/noise, run many independent copies in parallel and combine their outputs. Usually 1 is more interesting than 2. This ...


16

The crucial piece of this problem is the Fast Fourier Transform. This algorithm turns a waveform (your sung note) into a frequency distribution. Once you've computed the FFT you identify the fundamental frequency (usually the frequency with the highest amplitude in the FFT, but this depends somewhat on your microphone's frequency response curve and exactly ...


8

Why not: int counters[256] = {0}; for(int i = 0; i <inString.length(); i++) counters[inString[i]]++; } std::cout << "Count occurences of \'a\'" << counters['a'] << std::endl;


8

Saying that there is noise in your signal is very vague and doesn't convey much information at all. Some of the questions are: Is the noise high frequency or low frequency? Is it well separated from your signal's frequency band or is it mixed in? Does the noise follow a statistical model? Can it be described as a stationary process? Is the noise another ...


7

You would usually do a Fourier transform on the input, then identify the most prominent frequency. This might not be the whole story though, since any nonsynthetic sound source produces a number of frequencies (they make up what is described as "tone colour"). Anyway, it can be done efficiently; there are real-time autotuners (you didn't believe that pop ...


7

You're looking for a frequency estimation or pitch-detection algorithm. Most people suggest finding the maximum value of the FFT, but this is overly simplistic and doesn't work as well as you might think. If the fundamental is missing (a timpani, for instance), or one of the harmonics is larger than the fundamental (a trumpet, for instance), it won't ...


6

You can use an array indexed by character: int counters[256]; for (int i = 0; i < inString.length(); i++) { counters[(unsigned char)inString[i]]++; } You will also want to initialise your counters array to zero, of course.


6

You can't get additional information from nowhere, but you can reduce latency by overlapping successive FFTs. For real-time power spectrum estimates it's common to overlap successive input windows by 50%. Inserting zeroes between samples is another useful trick - it gives you more apparent resolution in the output bins, but in reality all you are doing is ...


6

Depends on your definition of "correct". This is doing what you intended, I think, but it's probably not very useful. I would suggest using a 2D spectrogram instead, as you'll get time-localized information on frequency content. There is no one correct way of normalising FFT output; there are various different conventions (see e.g. the discussion here). ...


5

To address the OP's specific example: I think your understanding of human voice frequency is wrong. Perhaps the fundamental frequency of male spoken voice stays in that range (for tenor singing, or female speech or singing, or shouting, even the fundamental will go much higher, maybe 500-1000 Hz). But that doesn't even matter, because even if the fundamental ...


5

You can download lists of stopwords as files in various formats, e.g. from here -- all Python needs to do is to read the file (and these are in csv format, easily read with the csv module), make a set, and use membership in that set (probably with some normalization, e.g., lowercasing) to exclude words from the count.


5

MFCCs combine consideration of aspects of human hearing (logarithmic frequency perception, the mel scale) and physics of musical instruments (these systems often have well defined overtones that are harmonic -- which is why the MFCCs use the FFT of the FFT), to give a simplified representation of the timbre of an instrument (where the fundamental frequency ...


5

Note that the output of an FFT is an array of complex values, i.e. each bin = re + j*im. I think you can just combine the abs and square operations and calculate re*re + im*im for each bin. This gives you a single positive value for each bin, and obviously you can calculate the log value for each bin quite easily. You then need to do a second FFT on this log ...


5

Nothing wrong with the chirp function... You just need to plot your db_fft against frequency values, and not vector indexes =). plot(linspace(fo,f1,length(db_fft)), db_fft); I also tested calculating the FFT of your signal using my other FFT methods and they too indicate a range between 0 and 400 Hz. UPDATE: IMO, I find it visually easier not to ...


4

Pretty much every answer says to do an FFT. I've written this program myself, and I found that the FFT was good at roughly identifying the strongest frequency, but that there was some "smearing" out as a result -- it's not always easy to precisely identify tiny variations from the target pitch using an FFT, particularly if the sample is short. Erik Kallen's ...


4

$ xwininfo Now hit your terminal window with the mouse to obtain the window's id from the line like that: xwininfo: Window id: 0x1e0000f "green" Ask xev utility to track X events of your window, logging its output. $ xev -id 0x1e0000f > log & Type in some text and get your statistics from the log, filtering the keyreleases: $ grep keysym ...


4

Take a look at lowpass/highpass/notch/bandpass filters, fourier transforms, or wavelets. The basic idea is there's lots of different ways to figure out the frequency content of a signal quantized over different time-periods. If we can figure out what wiggliness is, that would help. I would say the leftmost margin is wiggly b/c it has more high-frequency ...


4

I'm not exactly sure what you mean by taking the mean in general if Star is supposed to be an ordered factor. However, in the example you give where Star is actually a set of numeric values, you can use the following: library(Hmisc) R> review=matrix(c(5:1,10,2,1,1,2), nrow=5, ncol=2, dimnames=list(NULL,c("Star","Votes"))) R> wtd.mean(review[, 1], ...


4

There are a few different ways to tune instruments. The most commonly used for pianos is the 12 tone equal temperament, a formula for which can be found here. The idea is that each pair of adjacent notes has the same frequency ratio. See also equal temperament on Wikipedia.


4

It should be pointed out that you aren't calling map with the right type of arguments (thus the TypeError). It takes a single function and one or more iterables, to which the function is applied to. Your second argument is toChar[i] which would be a string. All iterables implement __iter__. To illustrate: >>> l, t = [], () >>> l.__iter__ ...


4

There are already many libraries to do FFTs for you. No reason to reinvent the wheel. DirectX has an implementation but it might only be in the most recent version. Here's an open source C library for it. If you want to understand the math behind it, here's a simple explanation and here's a complicated explanation.


4

You're making your life much harder than it needs to be. Use a hash: my %freq; while(defined($c = getc(INPUT))) { $freq{$c}++; } print $_, " ", $freq{$_}, "\n" for sort keys %freq; $freq{$c}++ increments the value stored in $freq{$c}. (If it was unset or zero, it becomes one.) The print line is equivalent to: foreach my $key (sort keys %freq) { ...


4

Try my version. It looks to me like you have all the information you need to find frequency peaks in your data if they exist. If all you can see is a big peak at zero frequency, you probably have a massive DC offset that is drowning out all your other data. I have put a remedy in my code . . x = randn(15000,1); %//This is the data you were given - I'll use ...


4

Unfortunately i don't think you'll be able to use C# to do this - AFAIK, there is no JIT compiler for it. I remember reading about something for Mono, which would make it available to use with C#, but i'm not sure right now. That said - i would go with c++. If you go that way, you can make use of a vast amount of audio analysis libraries, like CLAM ...


4

Consider the FFT of a single period of a sine wave: >>> t = np.linspace(0, 2*np.pi, 100) >>> x = np.sin(t) >>> f = np.fft.rfft(x) >>> np.round(np.abs(f), 0) array([ 0., 50., 1., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., ...


3

There's an easy way to handle this by slightly modifying the code you have (edited to reflect John's comment): stopWords = set(['a', 'an', 'the', ...]) fullWords = re.findall(r'\w+', allText) d = defaultdict(int) for word in fullWords: if word not in stopWords: d[word] += 1 finalFreq = sorted(d.iteritems(), key=lambda t: t[1], reverse=True) ...


3

I believe I answered a similar question you asked a while ago. IIUC, you want the more important terms to stand out, and you feel that "tom cruise" is more important than "cruise". This looks like a problem in your model of the data. TFIDF seems to be wrong for what you want. You can try building a language model, as described in Peter Norvig's "Beautiful ...


3

It is certainly possible, otherwise digital studio mixing software wouldn't exist. What your'e effectively asking for is to attenuate frequency ranges across an entire file. In analog land, you would apply a low-pass and a high-pass filter (or some other combination of filters) to attenuate the frequencies. In software, you'd solve this problem by writing ...


3

You want to use the Sum aggregate function to handle this. SELECT MyValue, Sum(weight) AS Total FROM mytable GROUP BY myvalue; Should do the trick!


3

For (2) I suggest the Goertzel algorithm, which is very simple to implement and will allow you to detect energy in a narrow range of frequencies.



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