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4

fs.readFileSync() just reads the data contained in the file, but it doesn't parse it. For that, you need an additional step: var settings = JSON.parse( fs.readFileSync('./config/settings.json', 'utf8') ); Using require() will parse the data automatically.


4

process.binding() is an internal API used by node to get a reference to the various core C++ bindings. 'fs' in process.binding('fs') is a reference to the C++ binding (src/node_file.cc in the node source tree) for the fs module. As mentioned, process.binding() references C++ bindings, so in this case binding.open() is exported here and defined here.


2

I believe you should convert the obj to a JSON string, otherwise it's a real - JSON object that can't be simply be written into file JSON.stringify(obj) https://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/JSON/stringify


2

This sounds like a job for a database, as database engines are typically more adept at handling multiple connections - ie adding records 'on-the-fly' as needed. Then later you can suck out the info into a text file if you like... or just apply SQL queries to the database to get back the information you really need. Determining what kind of database to use ...


2

You need to parse the string back to JSON if you want to use it like an object. If your file is a collection of arrays (1 array per line) then split it by \n like you do and then parse it with JSON.parse. You would need to run that on each line separately thought so use a map or a loop. If your file however is one big array of objects then just read it in ...


2

Try with the below code: fs.readFile('data.txt', 'utf8', function read(err, data) { if (err) { throw err; } data = JSON.parse(data); var dataObject = data[0]; for (i=0;i<Object.keys(dataObject).length;i++) { var ss = dataObject[i]; var key = Object.keys(ss); for(varj=0;j<ss[...


2

The problem is that you aren't ever giving it a chance to drain the buffer. Eventually this buffer gets full and you run out of memory. WriteStream.write returns a boolean value indicating if the data was successfully written to disk. If the data was not successfully written, you should wait for the drain event, which indicates the buffer has been drained. ...


1

If you want to run a an arbitrary list of tasks (unlinking files) asynchronously, but know when they are all done, you can use the async.js module. It can run tasks in series and parallel. So push all your unlink function calls into an array, then call async.parallel() and let them fly. Then when they are all done, you land in a single manageble callback....


1

Problem is you are reading the file content and pushing it to array and adding the new object to the array. Use file.write instead of file.append ie instead of fs.appendFile(fileToSave, JSON.stringify(arr),'utf8'); use fs.write(fileToSave, JSON.stringify(arr),someCallbackfn)


1

You need to assign something to module.exports not call it like a function. module.exports is an object checke.js var fs = require('fs'); module.exports = { checkE: function checkE() { var accts = []; var path = 'e:\\subdirectory\\'; for (var i = 1; i <10000; i++ ) { var target = fs.statSync(path + i.toString()) ...


1

Because you are pushing promises into the subfiles array. Here is a simple fix. It can have errors when you run it, but you should at least be in an easier position to fix them in case you run into problems: function loadJSONFolderFiles(p_path) { var deferred = Q.defer(); var subfiles = []; fs.readdir(p_path, function (err, files) { if (...


1

using stream solves the problem: var stream = require('stream'); var bufferStream = new stream.PassThrough(); bufferStream.end(new Buffer(myJSON)); bufferStream.pipe(table.createWriteStream(metadata)) .on('complete', function(job) { job .on('error', console.log) .on('...


1

Assuming you're running Electron v0.37.5 or later, I think this should do the trick: fetch(fileUrl).then(response => { var buff = Buffer.from(response.arrayBuffer()); fsp.writeFile("filename.pdf", buff).then(() => { console.log('Success!') }); });



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