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11

The code can be made shorter by using generic promisification and the .map method: var Promise = require("bluebird"); var fs = Promise.promisifyAll(require("fs")); //This is most convenient way if it works for you var directory = "templates"; var getFiles = function () { return fs.readdirAsync(directory); }; var getContent = function (filename) { ...


11

Use the basename method of the path module: path.basename('/foo/bar/baz/asdf/quux.html') // returns 'quux.html' Here is the documentation the above example is taken from.


5

Why not just try opening the file ? fs.open('YourFile', 'a', function (err, fd) { ... }) anyway after a minute search try this : var path = require('path'); path.exists('foo.txt', function(exists) { if (exists) { // do something } }); // or if (path.existsSync('foo.txt')) { // do something } Or this by using fs.stat: ...


3

No https://github.com/joyent/node/blob/master/lib/fs.js#L1422 fs.createReadStream = function(path, options) { return new ReadStream(path, options); }; Fine print: YES. fs.createReadStream costs you 1 extra wrapper function call


3

It's difficult to tell what you're doing wrong as you only show part of your program, but here is a demonstration of a similar program working. test.txt: testing test.coffee: fs = require 'fs' config = 'test.txt' foo = -> fs.readFileSync config, 'utf8' console.log foo() Output: $ coffee test.coffee testing


3

If you read it from a buffer, you can convert it with JSON.parse(). > var fs = require('fs'); undefined > a=fs.readFileSync('a.json'); <Buffer 7b 0d 0a 20 20 20 20 22 67 6c 6f 73 73 61 72 79 22 ...> > JSON.parse(a); { glossary: { title: 'example glossary', GlossDiv: { title: 'S', GlossList: [Object] } } } File must be a valid JSON. ...


3

I ran into the same predicament when I updated to 0.6.5. What I'm currently doing is getting the path like this: var meteor_root = Npm.require('fs').realpathSync( process.cwd() + '/../' ); This returns on dev mode: /my/application/.meteor/local/build/programs and on bundled mode: /my/application/build/app/programs So from here I'm getting to my ...


3

There are a few things that might cause ENOENT when writing a file. The destination directory (in this case, E:\Desktop\SniffIt\bin\xml) does not exist. A newline (CR and/or LF) in the filename. You should be using a proper XML parser to read your input file. This would probably help you avoid the spurious newlines you're getting.


3

writeFile expects data to be a String or a Buffer, so it is printing the .toString() representation of your array. This looks something like "Every,Dog,Must".... Wrap it with JSON.stringify(output) to get a nice JSON representation "['Every','Dog','Must',....]".


3

Ah, figured it out. It seems that console.log isn't finishing before the process exits... If I use console.warn, the message does show up. This post explains it: is node.js' console.log asynchronous? Also, I'm on an older version (0.8.15), so this may no longer be relevant.


3

Assuming you mean record separator, not field separator, with GNU awk you'd do: gawk -v RS='^$' '{ print "<" $0 ">" }' file Replace the print with whatever you really want to do and update your question with some sample input and expected output if you want help with that part too. The portable way to do this, by the way, is to build up the record ...


2

You are not exiting your function after encountering an error. fs.stat(dir + "/" + file, function (err, stats) { if (err) { console.log(err); return; // exit here since stats will be undefined } if (stats.isFile()) { calback(dir + "/" + file); } if (stats.isDirectory()) { ...


2

@Fox: great answer! Here's a bit of an extension with some more options. It's what I've been using lately as a go-to solution: var fs = require('fs'); fs.lstat( targetPath, function (err, inodeStatus) { if (err) { // file does not exist- if (err.code === 'ENOENT' ) { console.log('No file or directory at',targetPath); return; } ...


2

If the directories have a name that are a valid semver string (like yours) the easiest way is to use the semver module and use the gt function. Something like this: var greater = function (dir, cb){ var max = null; fs.readdir (dir, function (error, entries){ if (error) return cb (error); if (!entries.length) return cb (); ...


2

You've just bound to the wrong stream. 'data' events will occur on readable streams, like the stream created by ytdl. stream.on('data', function (chunk) { // ... }); And 'close' events will occur on both streams if you're using Node 0.8 or older. While 0.10 changed the event for writable streams to 'finish'.


2

The error seems to mean that you have too many file descriptions open. You have to make sure at some point that you close() them. var fd = fs.openSync(filePath,"r"); var fr = fs.readSync(fd, buffer, 0, size, 0); fs.closeSync(fd); As for how to handle the error, you can use try...catch with thrown errors: try { var fd = fs.openSync(filePath,"r"); ...


2

I haven't tested. var fs = require("fs"); var filename = "./index.html"; function start (resp) { resp.writeHead(200, {"Content-Type":"text/html"}); fs.readFile(filename, "utf8", function (err, data) { if (err) throw err; resp.write(data); resp.end(); }); }


1

This seems to work ok. It's self contained so you can just paste into a HTML file to see it run. Basically keep running a regular expression to match the whole line starting with the username passed. The whole line is returned ("gm" part of regular expression tells it to match a line at a time) as a string. Then you just to a replace of that returned line ...


1

Yes, you should change that to an async call. I recommend using the Q library to make this call, as well as other async calls. Example (straight from Q docs): var readFile = Q.denodeify(FS.readFile); Then use it as such: readFile("foo.txt", "utf-8") .then(function(data) { //other processing } Or adapted to your example: ...


1

Yes - we should make async what we can. "readFile" is fine ! But this might not be the most important part: Additionally the path says "fullsize" and so you should think about streaming the files. You spoke about 1000 concurrent users and it depends how big the images are : An async readFile will load the whole file to memory. And what if you have 1000 ...


1

I came up with a recursive file walker for your case. var fs = require('fs'); var filetree = {}; var walkDirectory = function(path, obj) { var dir = fs.readdirSync(path); for (var i = 0; i < dir.length; i++) { var name = dir[i]; var target = path + '/' + name; var stats = fs.statSync(target); if (stats.isFile()) { if ...


1

You can create an array and use the push() method. var fs = require('fs'); fs.readdir('.', function (err, files) { if (err) throw err; var filenames = []; for (var index in files) { console.log(files[index]); filenames.push(files[index]); } // do something with "filenames" // ['file1.js', 'file2.js', 'file3.js'] });


1

writeFile doesn't need a close method because it opens/writes/closes the file all in a single call. The main criteria do decide between the two is not the presence/need of an explicit close but rather: does the data fit easily in RAM? If it does, then writeFile is certainly simpler to use (and potentially a slightly bit faster); else, you better use streams ...


1

fs.close() is actually used to close a file descriptor optained from fs.open() or similar functions. What you might be looking at it is writeable.close(). fs.write() will fully write and finish a file in a single call. For writing streams, you must close them when finished writing unless you use readable.pipe(). The main difference between ...


1

The writes actually do not fail. When you delete a file that is open in another program you are deleting a named link to that file's inode. The program that has it open still points to that inode. It will happily keep writing to it, actually writing to disk. Only now you don't have a way to look it at, because you deleted the named reference to it. (If ...


1

Your test do not work because karma - is a testrunner for client-side JavaScript (javascript who run in browser), but you want to test node.js code with it (which run on the server part). So karma just can't run server-side tests. You need different testrunner, for example take a look to jasmine-node.


1

Try this: var t = ""; myReader = fs.createReadStream(file, { flags: 'r', encoding: 'UTF-8', fd: null, mode: 0666, bufferSize: 128 * 1024, autoClose: true }) myReader.addListener("data", function (chunk) { t += chunk; })


1

You can not remove a folder that has files in it. You need to delete all the files in the folder first. There's no quick way to delete a whole tree in Node.js. You could, make it a little easier by using node-file-utils. It has a walk function that will traverse subdirectories of a path. You could use that to fairly easily delete all files in a path.


1

If you don't pass a string or a buffer to writeFile, the toString function of what you pass is called. In your case it returns "[object Object]". You have to convert it yourself : fs.writeFile(logfile_name, JSON.stringify(jsonObject), function(err){ I would advise against naming a JavaScript object variable "jsonObject" : it might create confusion ...


1

You need to add a package.js in your app or a smart package that explicitly specifies the dependency via Npm.depends before you can use Npm.require. You don't need the Npm.depends or a smart package if you are using a built-in npm package such as fs, but you still need to make sure you are using it on the server-side and not the client side. For an example, ...



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