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I've only done this once, so I may be wrong, but it looks like you're bundling your app content into the exe? If you do this, node-webkit will extract the app contents into the %TEMP% folder and then run the content from there. Try checking the command line arguments to see if arg[0] will point you to the actual node-webkit exe that's running the app. ...


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Found the solution. var form = new app.npm.multiparty.Form(); This was defined at global level. Where as for every new request I should be creating a new instance of the form because stream is off in the previous call so I should create a new instance by getting latest contents. The solution looks likes: app.post('/documents', function (req, res) { var ...


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ReadStream.destroy You can call the ReadStream.destroy function at any time. var fs = require('fs'); var readStream = fs.createReadStream('lines.txt'); readStream .on('data', function (chunk) { console.log(chunk); readStream.destroy(); }) .on('end', function () { // This may not been called since we are destroying the ...


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Try this peice of Code below: It called the .exists method which check if a path exists or not var fs = require('fs'), oldPath = 'firstfile.txt', newPath = 'temp/firstfile.txt'; fs.exists(newPath, function(exists){ if (!exists) { fs.rename(oldPath, newPath, function (err) { console.log('rename callback ', err); }); } else { ...


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I don't think node exposes any filesystem locking mechanisms. If you were going to use filesystem for system-wide locks or secure inter-process communication, you'll need to find another way (e.g. sockets). If it's not security critical there are some ways of making it harder (but not impossible) for other processes to mess with your files: Use ...


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You'll want to use a streaming version of the API to pipe your readable filesystem stream directly to the S3 upload http request body stream provided by the s3 module you are using. Here's an example straight from the aws-sdk documentation var fs = require('fs'); var body = fs.createReadStream('bigfile'); var s3obj = new AWS.S3({params: {Bucket: ...


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Your read function is returning the result of the fs.readFile function, which is undefined because it doesn't have a return clause (it uses callbacks). Your second return clause is in an anonymous function, so it only returns to that scope. Anyhow, your function knows its finished after that first return. The standard way to use fs.readFile is to use ...


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You are using walker on files not walker on file. So stats might contain an array of files not only one. Try console.log(stats) to see the stats argument structure for files. Or maybe try walker.on('file', function(path, stats, next){});


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Looking at the docs for fs.Stats there's no such name property. fs.stat is analogous with stat() which also doesn't have a name in the struct it returns either. If you're wanting the filename, you don't even need to call stat(). Consider this: var fs = require('fs'); fs.readdir('.', function(err, entries) { // filenames available here in the array ...


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You are overwriting your paths with the callback function of parallel. Just remove the first parameter from your functions which is the callback and not your data: function(callback) { console.log(outDesired); fs.readFile(outDesired, 'utf8',function(error, data) { if (error) { return callback(error); ...


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So you should just handle that error there. That's the place in code that knows best how to handle it and what caused it. The broader last-resort places are server.on('error', handler) but that's for errors within the express HTTP service processing logic itself, not any error in the entire node process. For any error in the process there's ...


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Not to detract, but... Another option you might want to use is the Meteor file structure itself. You could bypass NPM and use your Assets in Meteor. In Meteor, things in your private folder can be accessed by something like var data = Assets.getText("example.txt").toString().split("\n"); for example, if you wanted to turn a document into an array of word. ...


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Please see the edits to the log function. exports.log = function(data, addDate, callback){ if (typeof addDate === 'undefined') { myVariable = false; } var now = new Date(); var date = now.getDate() + "-" + (now.getMonth() + 1) + "-" + now.getFullYear(); var time = now.getHours() + now.getMinutes(); if(addDate){ ...


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The short answer is that FS.Collection creates a Mongo collection that you can treat like any other, i.e., you can list entries using find(). The long answer... Using cfs:filesystem, you can create a mongo database that mirrors a given folder on the server, like so: // in lib/files.js files = new FS.Collection("my_files", { stores: [new ...


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Found it :) if the module is install like this : sudo npm install mymodule The file is not editable but if module is install without sudo everything is fine npm install mymodule


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I think you want to remove that callback, and add the file name to your parameters: function doesExist(firstInitial) { try { fs.statSync('./cmds/' + firstInitial + '.json') return true } catch(err) { return !(err && err.code === 'ENOENT'); } } let fileExists = doesExist('somefile'); Btw, there is also fs.exists.



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