Hot answers tagged

10

Fslex and fsyacc are used by the F# compiler, so they kind of work. I have used them a few years ago, it was good enough for my needs. However, my experience is that lex/yacc is much less mature in F# than in OCaml. Many people in the OCaml community have used them for years, including many students (it seems like writing a small interpreter/compiler with ...


10

Fslex and fsyacc are certainly ready for production use. After all, they are used in Microsoft Visual Studio 2010, because the F# lexer and parser are written using them (The F# compiler source code is also a good example that demonstrates how to use them efficiently). I'm not sure how fslex/fsyacc compare to their OCaml equivalents or with ANTLR. However, ...


10

Unfortunately, there is no built-in item template for .fsl files, because FsLex is a part of PowerPack (so Visual Studio cannot expect that it will be installed). It would be definitely useful to have some template that could be installed with PowerPack! Anyway, if you're looking for a sample project that uses FsLex (and has .fsl files as part of the ...


9

I personally found these OcamlLex and OcamlYacc tutorials excellent resources to get started -- easy to follow, and you can translate most everything in those tutorials for FsLex/FsYacc almost verbatim.


6

Maybe you need to generate a unicode lexer. A unicode lexer works with a LexBuffer<char> rather than LexBuffer<byte>. The "unicode" argument to FsLex is optional, but if enabled generates a unicode lexer. http://blogs.msdn.com/dsyme/archive/2009/10/21/some-smaller-features-in-the-latest-release-of-f.aspx


5

Well, with lex and yacc, you put C/C++ code in the 'actions', whereas with fslex and fsyacc you put F# code there, but I presume you know this? I think they are otherwise based on the same (established/ancient) tokenizing and parsing technologies, so the general structure/behavior of the grammar should be similar, if that's what you're after...


5

Apologies if I answer my own question, but I'd like to contribute with my own solution to the problem for future reference. I am keeping state across lexer function calls with the LexBuffer<_>.BufferLocalStore property, which is simply a writeable IDictionary instance. Note: long brackets are used both by long string and multiline comments. This is ...


4

My quick guess is that this function has been renamed to fromString (because, in general, functions with underscores such as of_seq are now written in camelCase).


4

I actually managed to find a solution on my own. I defined my own tokenizer function which decides based on the BufferLocalStore state which tokenizer to call. let mytokenizer (lexbuf : LexBuffer<char>) = if lexbuf.BufferLocalStore.["state"].Equals("core") then FCLexer.core lexbuf else FCLexer.tokenize lexbuf let aString (x : string) = ...


4

The fslex and fsyacc tools were specifically written for the F# compiler and were not intended for wider use. That said, I have managed to get significant code bases ported from OCaml to F# thanks to these tools but it was laborious due to the complete lack of VS integration on the F# side (OCaml has excellent integration with syntax highlighting, jump to ...


4

It's hard to give an answer without knowing a little more about what the DSL is supposed to do and how complex it may get in the future. If your DSL is about workflow then WF would seem like a very logical choice to store your parsed results in. If your language is not too complex then LINQ or a handrolled little parser could very well do. It's good to ...


4

It's pretty normal to do semantic analysis in the lexer for constants like strings and numeric literals, so you might consider a lex rule for your string constants like | '\'' [^ '\'']* '\'' { STRING (let s = lexeme lexbuf in s.Substring(1, s.Length - 2)) }


3

I had forgotten to install F# 2.0. There was a dependency on that.


3

You might find this bullet-point comparison of FParsec with parser generator tools (e.g. fslex & fsyacc) and "hand‚Äźwritten" recursive descent parsers useful for choosing between the available alternatives.


3

Lex/Yacc are usually better for complete languages with complicated grammars. Parsec is faster to work with when you have short semi-simple tasks. I think that for your case, Lex/Yacc would be much more suitable.


3

I'm using the free VS Shell until I finally threaten myself enough to finally buy the full VS, and unless I'm doing something wrong, (and I probably am) none of the normal solutions seem to work for me. What I do is add the following pre-build events to the project properties: "C:\Program Files (x86)\FSharpPowerPack-2.0.0.0\bin\fslex.exe" ...


2

Doing a little research it looks like they need to be separate. I found the following at this blog post ( http://blogs.msdn.com/chrsmith/archive/2008/01/18/fslex-Sample.aspx ) by Chris Smith: Although you can add an F# Lex Specification file from the Visual Studio Add-In, to run fslex you will need to break to the command line. Fslex.exe is located in ...


2

Lexing.LexBuffer<_>.FromString ?


2

I think you have to put the unicode characters in single quotes, just like in normal F# code. At least that seems to work for a small example that I tested.


2

Functions and members marked as inline cannot be overloaded, so your original strategy won't work. You need to write different code for both of the declarations, so you need to use overloading (if you want to write this without boxing and dynamic type tests). If you're using standard F# tools, then the type you'll get as a buffer will always be ...


2

Okay, here it is. Each lexer rule (i.e. rule <name> = parse .. cases ..) defined a function <name> : LexBuffer<char> -> 'a, where 'a can be any type. Usually, you return tokens (possibly defined for you by FsYacc), so then you can parse text like that: let parse text = let lexbuf = LexBuffer<char>.FromString text ...


2

Try to keep semantic analysis like "...only if the identifier is between . and (" out of your lexer (fslex), and instead save it for your parser (fsyacc). i.e. one option would be to keep your lexer ignorant of operations: let identifier = [ 'a'-'z' 'A'-'Z' ]+ // ... rule tokenize = parse // ... | '.' { DOT } | '(' { LPAREN } | identifier { ID (lexeme ...


2

F# no longer allows type aliases that add generic type parameters to a type without declaring a new type. If you want to define a generic type that wraps some other type, you have to use some constructor. For example, you can use single-case discriminated union: type 'a Cucomment = CC of string Unfortunately, this means that you'd have to change all code ...


2

The annotations you see in the generated code are F# Compiler Directives (specifically, the 'line' directive). The 'line' directive makes it so that when the F# compiler needs to emit a warning/error message for some part of the generated code, it has a way to determine which part of the original file corresponds to that part of the generated code. In other ...


2

As written, your myText function appears to be OK -- the F# compiler should be able to make that tail-recursive. One thing to check -- are you compiling/running this in Debug or Release configuration? By default, the F# compiler only does tail-call optimization in the Release configuration. If you want tail-calls while you're debugging, you need to ...


2

Since you include the ocaml tag I'll answer for ocamllex. It's true that handling comments is difficult, especially if your language wants to be able to comment out sections of code. In this case, the comment lexer has to look for (a reduced set of) tokens inside comments, so as not to be fooled by comment closures appearing in quoted context. It also means ...


1

What is the most suitable tool to parse such kind of language? I would use active patterns.


1

(This is a separate answer) For this specific case, this might solve your issue better: ... rule tokenize = parse ... | '.' { DOT } | '(' { LPAREN } | identifier { ID (lexeme lexbuf) } ... And the usage: let parse'' text = let lexbuf = LexBuffer<char>.FromString text let rec tokenize = let stack = ref [] fun lexbuf -> ...


1

You can use lexeme with quotes, but trim quotes in parser Lexer: let constant = ("'" ([^ '\''])* "'") ... | constant { STRING(lexeme lexbuf) } Parser: %token <string> STRING ... constant: | STRING { ($1).Trim([|'''|]) } Or if you want to extract quotes from string: Lexer: let name = alpha (alpha | digit | '_')* let ...


1

When I was playing around with FsLex I found the Ocamllex Tutorial a great help, in particular the nested comments section was easy to change into F#.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible