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8

I assume that by "when I remove ios::binary" you mean you remove the entire argument: f1.open("file1"); The function open() has two parameters - file name and mode. The mode one has a default argument of std::ios_base::in | std::ios_base::out. So if you don't specify anything, this deault gets used. If you specify ios::binary, however, you replace the ...


3

I tried your code and it worked fine on 4.9.2, a quick diff of the tags revealed the following: diff --git a/libstdc++-v3/include/bits/fstream.tcc b/libstdc++-v3/include/bits/fstream.tcc index 483a576..21a67cd 100644 --- a/libstdc++-v3/include/bits/fstream.tcc +++ b/libstdc++-v3/include/bits/fstream.tcc @@ -1,6 +1,6 @@ // File based streams -*- C++ -*- ...


3

There are two common ways to replace or otherwise modify a file. The first and the "classic" way is to read the file, line by line, check for the line(s) that needs to be modified, and write to a temporary file. When you reach the end of the input file you close it, and rename the temporary file as the input file. The other common way is when the file is ...


2

What happens in swap() if one of the words is the empty sting ""? If this happens, litery = "". The condition in the loops will be to iterate from 0 to (unsigned) 0 - 1, which is a very large number. You'll then execute if (litery[0] > litery[1]) litery[1] will access beyond the end of the empty string, which causes undefined behavior. Let's fix this: ...


2

replace it: for (int i = 0; i < c.length(); i++) { if (c[i] == ' ') c[i] = ' '; } with: string singleSpace=" "; string doubleSpace=" "; int position = c.find( doubleSpace ); while ( position != string::npos ) { c.replace( position, doubleSpace.length(), singleSpace ); position = c.find(doubleSpace, position + 1 ...


2

You could use as a replace algorithm, something like this: std::string s = "bla bla bla"; std::string onespace = " "; std::string doublespace = " "; size_t start_pos = 0; while(( start_pos = s.find(doublespace, start_pos)) != std::string::npos) { s.replace(start_pos, doublespace.length(), onespace); start_pos += onespace.length(); } This ...


2

while (!myfile.eof()) is almost always wrong, and will read one more time than you expect. You should say while(myfile >> hex >> x1.i >> x2.i) But the main issue is that E281C40C can't be read into an int, you need an unsigned int. This is also the reason for your infinite loop - since the read fails before reaching the end of the ...


2

You are passing a std::string to the std::ofstream constructor. This is a C++11 feature and to use this you need to pass -std=c++11 to GCC or Clang. MSVC automatically compiles for its hybrid not-quite-C++11-or-anything-else language that the compiler release compiles. If you're using Qt 5's qmake, you can do just CONFIG+=c++11 and you're good to go. ...


2

Relative paths do work with streams. You have two interesting cases though. The tilde (~) is a special character that some shells interpret. I suspect that fstream doesn't do that interpretation. As to the example of "./test.txt", I think the previous comment is correct - that file has been created - it's just not where you expected it.


2

What you want to do is you read the line into a string then you can cut out what you need using substr for example check if it's a number and then read the next line. #include <fstream> #include <string> std::ifstream file( "file.txt" ); std::string line; while( std::getline( file , line ) ) { line.substr( 0 , 2 ) // for example the first ...


2

You would have to enumerate all the fields (if you're not going to use a system call). That can be done like this: #include <fstream> #include <string> template <class File> struct lock_helper // Simple fstream manager just for convenience { template<class... Us> lock_helper(File& file, Us&&... us) { ...


2

You probably should not create a text file in the first place. Did you consider using sqlite (or indexed files à la GDBM ...) or some real database like PostgreSQL or MongoDb? If you insist on editing programmatically a textual file, the only way is to process every line : either keep all of them in memory, or copy them (except the one you'll change) to ...


2

It's not a good idea to store all the lines you read in, because there can be e.g. a billion lines. You only need to store the last 6. The following code is designed to produce those lines in reverse order, as the question indicates that is a requirement: #include <iostream> #include <string> #include <deque> using namespace std; auto ...


2

You need to call std::ios::clear on the input stream after the first read. When you read the whole file, it sets the failbit in the stream and will refuse to keep reading, even if the file actually changed in the meantime. ifstream is(filename); string line; while (getline(is, line)) cout << "line: " << line << endl; ofstream ...


2

change char buf[BUF_SIZE]; into char buf[BUF_SIZE+1]; and insert buf[numread]=0; before o<<buf; Otherwise buf contains garbage data behind the data received by read, and o << buf will copy that garbage data until it finds a '\0'


1

new unsigned char(sizeof(BITMAPFILEHEADER)); This does not allocate an array! It allocates a single unsigned char. Write: new unsigned char[sizeof(BITMAPFILEHEADER)]; You get that right later on in your code, so presumably this is just a typo.


1

How to read a file and print it reverse, in only three statements of code (excluding declarations and other boilerplate): #include <iostream> #include <vector> #include <algorithm> #include <iterator> void read_and_print_reverse_n(std::istream& is, const int n) { std::vector<std::string> v; // This call reads all ...


1

When you hit the end of the file while reading is the first time, it sets the eofbit in the stream's internal error state. You need to clear it before you can continuing reading, by calling the is.clear() function, which resets the internal error state.


1

I think the answer here would solve the purpose where you store the lines in a vector and iterate the vector from the end. As you are looking for some direct method to read the file, you can read the file character by character starting from the end using seekg and tellg. #include <iostream> #include <fstream> #include ...


1

Binary floating points don't know how many significant digits there may be (this is to some extend different to decimal floating points which are not normalized and indicate a number of significant digits). Floating point numbers are formatted based on the flag stored in the precision() field of a stream. If you want to retain more digits you could consider ...


1

You don't appear to be writing to a file: outFile << it->second.listInfo() << endl; // This doesnt return anything it simply writes to standard out. void listInfo(){ cout << "NAME: " << name << "Adress " << adress << "Color " << color; } You are probably looking to do something like this: void ...


1

std::ios_base::binary by itself is not a valid openmode for std::basic_fstream. The valid openmode combinations can be found on Table 132: The constructor of std::basic_fstream and its open() method both forward the open() method on the internal std::basic_filebuf through rdbuf()->open(s, mode) where mode is the openmode. As you can see from the ...


1

That's a pretty cleanly formatted file. You should do fine with something like: #include <fstream> ifstream my_ifstream("data_file.txt"); // Create fstream from file. while ( my_ifstream ) { std::string airport; double rise; double set; std::string tz; my_ifstream >> airport >> rise >> set >> tz; // ...


1

"The folder "levels" is hosted in the debug folder. same folder as the exe." It doesn't matter in which position the levels folder is in relation to the executable's path. The relevant folder to determine the relative path is the working directory where your executable is actually started from. See here: fstream doesn't resolve path also.


1

Use ReadLine and find the line you wanna replace, and use replace to replace the thing you wanna replace. For example write: string Example = "Text to find"; openFile="C:\\accounts.txt"; // the path of the file ReadFile(openFile, Example); OR #include <fstream> #include <iostream> #include <string> int main() { ifstream openFile; ...



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