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21

"THE LONG STORY; SHORT" - ANSWER Since a std::fstream is not derived from either std::ofstream, nor std::ifstream, the reference is not "compatible" with the instance of std::fstream. Use std::istream& and std::ostream&, instead of std::ifstream& and std::ofstream& (respectively). void write_data (std::ostream&); void read_data ...


7

You can create a stream buffer which reads from a FILE*. Clearly, you may need to change your code to use std::istream in case you use std::ifstream in other places than creating the stream but this should be a straight forward change. Here is a simple demo showing how to create a corresponding stream buffer and how to use it: #include <cstdio> ...


7

The currently accepted answer is just wrong. When returning a local variable with automatic storage, of the same type as the declared return type of the function, then there is a two phase process going on: fstream open_user_file() const { fstream f; /*...*/ return f; } The selection of the constructor for the copy is first performed as if ...


7

for (auto i : accounts) Each i that you get is a copy of an element in accounts. When you do i.name = tmp_name, you're only modifying this copy. You need to take a reference instead so that you can modify the elements themselves: for (auto& i : accounts)


6

You should use streams to do that. See this example : #include <fstream> #include <iomanip> #include <sstream> #include <iostream> for(unsigned long int i = 0; i < nbr_Accounts; ++i) { std::ostringstream oss; oss << std::setw(10) << std::setfill('0') << i; std::string filename = oss.str() + ...


6

You're reading 4 characters but not adding a zero terminator, furthermore your comparison is wrong since you're not comparing strings equality, you should rather do: char buffer[5]; std::ifstream in(fn, std::ios::binary); in.read(buffer, 4); buffer[4] = '\0'; // Add a zero-terminator at the end if (strcmp(buffer,"RIFF")) { // If buffer isn't ...


6

Sure. You'd just create a suitable stream buffer which probably stores to other stream buffers it writes to internally. Using this stream buffer you'd then create an std::ostream you are writing to. For example, here is a simple implementation of this approach: #include <streambuf> #include <ostream> class teebuf : public std::streambuf { ...


6

There is a typo in your code. At line 27 you define a multi-byte char constant with '<\n'. Remove the < sign and it should work fine.


6

You might be appending control characters, not 'regular' characters. This is assuming, of course, that the type of num_attempts_x_million is an int (or any integer type). std::string::operator+= does not have an overload for int. Instead, it has one for char so it casts it into a char first and then appends it. For low integer values, this ends up with ...


6

ifstream fin("input.txt"); will open the file with fin as stream object why calling open member function again ? same goes for fout object too. Calling open on an already open stream fails, meaning the failbit flag is set to true. Just open once ifstream fin("input.txt"); ofstream fout("output.txt");


6

Streams are not copyable so struct option is therefore not copyable because it has a non-copyable member (fpointer). Pass struct option by reference to avoid the copy: void some_function(option& a_option) { }


6

You have fallen victim to the Most Vexing Parse, where the compiler sees your declaration as a function strings returning a vector<string>, taking two arguments: an istream_iterator<string> called file an unnamed pointer to function taking no arguments and returning a istream_iterator<string>. To eliminate the vexing parse, use an ...


6

What you are referring to are text files and not "notepads". And what you want to do is append content which can be done by opening the file in the "append" mode like this : std::fstream fs; fs.open ("test.txt", std::fstream::out | std::fstream::app);


5

1857 in binary 0111 0100 0001 Char truncates that to lower 8 bits which is 0100 0001 the binary of which is 65, the character 'A'


5

The problem being horribly underspecified, I'm just going to suggest using a library. I'm personally quite fond of Boost Serialization for feature set (object tracking, smart pointers, alias detection, cyclic graphs, polymorphic types and collections) non-intrusiveness (you can add serializability to 3rdparty types) portability (with the caveat that you ...


5

The command you've written will open a handle to a file at that location. In order to do anything with it, you'll need some sort of read or write operation. Probably your code is working fine :) For example, following your file.open("...") line: file << "This is some text to send to my now open file\n"; ... file.close();


5

No matching function to call for 'std::basic ofstream<char>::open( std::string&, const openmode&)' A "no matching function" error means that the compiler searched for but could not find an overload that matched the arguments provided at the call site. open() prior to C++11 had one overload which took a buffer of type char const*. This has ...


5

Your problem is actually really simple. You forgot to reset your get position: LoadFile.seekg(0, ios::end); int numberOfDevices = LoadFile.tellg() / sizeof(Device); for (int i = 0; i < numberOfDevices; i++) should be LoadFile.seekg(0, ios::end); int numberOfDevices = LoadFile.tellg() / sizeof(Device); LoadFile.seekg(0L, ios::beg); for (int i = 0; i ...


5

The most naive solution I can think of might look like this: #include <fstream> int main() { std::ifstream mySource("im1.jpg", std::ios::binary); std::ofstream myOutput("im2.jpg", std::ios::binary); for (char c; mySource.get(c); ) { std::cout << static_cast<unsigned int>(static_cast<unsigned char>(c)) ...


5

The difference is that >> reads the data first, and then tells you whether it has been a success or not, while file.eof() does the check prior to the reading. That is why you get an extra read with the file.eof() approach, and that read is invalid. You can modify the file.eof() code to make it work by moving the check to a place after the read, like ...


4

This is writing to a random location in memory: commands>>cmnd>>file; as cmnd (and file) is an uninitialized pointer. Use std::string instead of char* and check the result of IO operations immediately (don't use while(input.good()), see "while( !feof( file ) )" is always wrong for why): std::string cmnd; std::string file; if ...


4

std::vector<int>a[100]; declares an array containing 100 vectors. So a[i] is a vector, not an int. You can't read a vector directly from input. If you want vectors of size 100, instead of an array of 100 vectors, the syntax is std::vector<int> a(100);


4

vector<string> words; { ifstream file("Hangman.txt"); string word; while (file >> word) { words.push_back(word); } } string randword = words[rand() % words.size()];


4

The stream itself can throw exceptions when an error occurs. Just use its exceptions() method and pass the types of errors you want it to detect. This is more convenient than checking the state flags after each operation.


4

Just rewind your stream before you try to print. myFile.seekg(0, myFile.beg); // <--- while (getline(myFile, line)) { cout << line << '\n'; }


4

Why not just: #include <fstream> int main() { std::ifstream mySource("im1.jpg", std::ios::binary); std::ofstream myOutpue("im2.jpg", std::ios::binary); myOutpue << mySource.rdbuf(); } Or, less chattily: int main() { std::ofstream("im2.jpg", std::ios::binary) << std::ifstream("im1.jpg", std::ios::binary).rdbuf(); ...


4

Maybe your compiler is not C++11. Try changing output.open(file, ios::app); to output.open(file.c_str(), ios::app);


4

files.eof() is true once you've tried to read a character past the last one, not once you've read the last one. Because of this, files.eof() succeeds after the last character, but the flag is raised after you do files >> caractere. Since you don't check at this point, caractere is unmodified (it remains a point) and your program goes on until it loops ...


4

Two things are immediately apparent: sf::Vector2i map[500][200]; This declares one-hundred-thousand sf:: Vector2i objects in the automatic variable space of main(). Depending on your local stack space configuration on your platform, this may be problematic. For example, to consume 1MB to stack space would only require about 11 bytes of space per object. ...


4

Hate to disappoint you, but.. There's no standard way of clearing the contents of a file from an open std::fstream, the straight forward way is therefore to handle the two operations as what they really are.. two operations. First handle all the reading, and later the writing (through a different stream object). The solution In other words; first open ...



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