New answers tagged

0

For a point of view of class as a type that encapsulates the internal representation, to read/write using the direction of memory and size of the type is an error. This could work for POD types, but if book is a type with some data as pointers to dynamic memory, your code will not work.


2

As pointed out by others, many IDEs compile your program in some other directory, but they generally also provide a way to copy required files into that same location. Xcode is a case in point. If you find out where your program was created, put myfile.txt in that directory, invoke your program as `./myprogram', and your code will work. If you want to see ...


0

You are digging too deep. I made an example solution for you, focusing on the parsing. Things could be way shorter and we could instantly make the students instead of doing it the map way, but I want you to understand how to parse the file, because that is obviously what you are struggling with. Ask me anything about the code if you don't understand it. ...


1

your following function seems to be wrong: std::istream& operator >> (std::istream& in, Student& S) { std::string line; std::getline(in, line); in >> S.lastName >> S.grades[0] >> S.grades[1] >> S.grades[2] >> S.grades[3] >> S.grades[4]; getline(in, S.lastName); return in; } You read ...


-2

fstream can read and write. So you have to tell in the constructor what you are going to be using. like that: "fstream note("notes.txt", std::ios::out); or fstream note("notes.txt", std::ios::in); You can't open the file before you specifyed the "mode".


0

If you seekg > filesize the operation fails, the failbit is set and read does not work... (eof has not been set) If one operation fails, failbit is activated and all the following operation will be no-op until state bits are cleared. In this case, if seekg fails, istream::read will not read anything and, in particular, will not set eofbit. On the other ...


0

If you are not sure whether the file exists, or whether it is in the same directory as your executable, modify your code to check if the file opened, like this for example: void readFile() { ifstream read("numbersd.txt"); if(!read) { cerr << "File didn't open..Does it exist?" << endl; return; } ... Then, if it didn't open, here are ...


0

You could be doing many things wrong. 1) The file numbers.txt does not exist, and this code fails to check that the file was successfully opened. 2) The file numbers.txt exists, but does not contain ten integer numbers, separated by whitespace, and this code fails to check whether operator>> succeeded, or not. 3) This code also prints ten numbers to ...


0

After many reboots i figured, that current working directory is stated as /system32 after the startup. No wonder the files could be opened. First: In system32 are no such files located. Second: The program doesnt have permission to write in that directory. To solve this, I changend the directory using _chdir() and everythink works like a charm.


2

Before you can even begin the task of creating text files containing non-Latin characters, you have to determine which encoding to be used for your locale. For example, if your locale uses the UTF-8 encoding, the string "русский" will have to be encoded completely differently than if your locale is KOI8-R. The string "русский" in UTF-8 is represents by the ...


0

This worked for me well. #include <fstream> #include <locale> #include <codecvt> const locale utf8_locale = locale(locale(), new codecvt_utf8<wchar_t>()); wofstream file(url); file.imbue(utf8_locale); file << L"իմբյու" << endl;


0

You have to use unicode for encoding.


0

Let's say what you want to add is equivalent of text file like this: One Two Three But you don't want to have the text file. So one piece of code which would do the same thing is this: const char *lines[] = { "One", "Two", "Three", 0 }; for(int i = 0 ; lines[i] != 0 ; ++i) browser.add(lines[i]); Documentation link for that overload of add Please ...


1

It depends a lot on what browser::load() actually does internally, but let's assume that it will look for your filename and load it. You probably already know how to read / write a standard file (e.g. http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/files/). Now, if you just want to hide the file from the user, you can set OS specific hidden flags (e.g. windows). I'm ...


1

I cannot undrstand why you read 4 char in binary mode and then save them to int, i.e. to size_t. It would be easier to read from stream to size_t out directly: size_t out; rnd.read ( &out, sizeof(out) ); But, if it just an experiment I want to propose you some variants to pack 4 char into one 32-bit int. There is the first (C style) option with ...


2

Always test whether input succeeded after the read attempt! The stream cannot know what you are attempting to do. It can only report whether the attempts were successful so far. So, you'd do something like if (std::getline(stream, line)) { // deal with the successful case } else { // deal with the failure case } In the failure case you might want ...


2

Correct way to use getline() and EOF checking would be like this: bool getOneLine(void) { if (getline(inputfile, sentence)) { cout << "next sentence is: "<< sentence << endl; return true; } if (inputfile.eof()) cout << "EOF reached" << endl; else cout << "Some IO error" <...


0

You have one mistake here: found = what.find(sentence); You are seeking inside of what for the sentence. If sentence is empty, it will be found. Change it to found = sentence.find(what); You should definitivly learn how to use a debugger. That way you would find such issues pretty fast!


-2

You're probably using char* as datatype for text. Note that char is signed, so if you (think you) have a value of e.g. 200 there, it's really -72, and so if you cast that to int, you get -72 :)



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