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0

You can try something like this...not perfect, but just something you can use to understand and improve upon. C++ example - program.cpp #include <iostream> // provides cout, endl etc. #include <fstream> // provides file stream functionality #include <string> // provides string #include <stdlib.h> // provides atoi functionality ...


1

Dude seriously use delimiter next time , below is the code that is feasible solution but not optimal. This code read text file and copy item name like chisel into the item_name[20] array , copy quantity of item like 50 into the qty and also copy rate of item like 9.99 into rate and then calculate total price by calculating qty*rate that you want . There are ...


1

This person was having the same problem that you are having. http://www.cplusplus.com/forum/beginner/27799/ Make sure that your txt file is in the same directory that the exe is built into. From the above link this line of code might help ensure you are actually in the file. //Check if data file is open and reports if(read.is_open()) cout << ...


2

You are trying t open your file twice: ofstream saveFile(fileName.c_str()); // this opens the file saveFile.open(fileName.c_str()); // so does this That will put the file in an error state so no writing will happen. Just do this: ofstream saveFile(fileName.c_str()); // this opens the file And that should work. Or else you can do this: ofstream ...


1

THe problem is related to the text mode, which may convert certain sequences of bytes in the file into a sequence of different size. Take for example text mode under windows. Here the byte sequence '\r' '\n' in a file on the disk is converted at reading time into '\n'. Now imagine that you have a file: Hello\r\n World\r\n If you position yourself ...


1

If you want to set your pointer at position x from the end, you need to know where the end is, so you need to begin with: file.seekg(0, ios_base::end); int length = file.tellg(); When you will know the file length, you can set your pointer: file.seekg(length - x, ios_base::beg);


0

I'm going to presume that the working directory is being set to the path to the executable file instead of your CMakeLists.txt file. To fix this, EITHER: put the .txt next to the executable file Explicitly set the working directory for debugging Enter the full path to the .txt file as explained in ti7's answer.


1

if inputFile.is_open() always returns false, inputFile.open("twoday.txt"); is not opening the file correctly, presumably because it can't find "twoday.txt" Try setting an explicit path like "c:/path/twoday.txt" or "/path/twoday.txt" if you're using Linux. You could also try writing a file instead to see where it shows up, or something more exotic to return ...


3

Try writing the array all at once, instead of 2 bytes-at-a-time.. Something like: save.write(world.worldGrid, sizeof(worldGrid)); See the docs


0

I'd use a memory mapped file here and preferrably use binary representation too. That way you can just store an array of ints and not need any (de)serialization code and/or seeking. E.g. Live On Coliru #include <stdexcept> #include <iostream> #include <algorithm> // memory mapping #include <sys/mman.h> #include ...


0

It will be something along the lines of save.seekp((row * number_columns + col)* size_of_element_data); save.write(element_data, size_of_element_data); But it will be a lot easier and safer to just read the file back in, edit the element, and write the whole file back out. You can't resize or insert an element in the middle of a file without shuffling ...


0

I suggest using memory mapped files instead of fstream. You can use boost for that. Boost library documentation There is stack overflow thread that covers information about file mapping. Stack overflow Thred


1

The EASY way is to just write the entire array again. Particularly as it's fairly short. If you KNOW that each element is exactly 5 butes, you can set the write-location with seekp, so save.seekp((1 * 3 + 1) * 5) and then write that value alone. But it's probably more work than it's worth if your file isn't HUGE (the actual file will still be updated in at ...


0

What you want to do is seek to the correct portion of our output stream. fstream save; ... save.seekp(POSITION_IN_FILE); here's a full example: #include <iostream> #include <fstream> #include <string> #include <algorithm> using namespace std; #define BYTES_PER_BLOCK 5 void save_to_file(fstream& save, int value, int x, int ...


2

If you're absolutely sure of the 4 digits + exactly 1 space for each element and no tabl or newline occur in the file, you could use seekp(n*5,ios_base::beg) to position your next writing on the n-th element and just overwrite it. Suggesions If using this kind of positionning is safer with files opened with the ios::binary mode. In that case, you could ...


0

int loc=5; save.seekg ((loc-1)*5, save.beg); save << "0002"; try that guy :) The selected answer on C++ Fstream to replace specific line? seems like a pretty good explanation.


-1

int aNumOfLines = 0; ifstream aInputFile(iFileName); string aLineStr; while (getline(aInputFile, aLineStr)) { if (!aLineStr.empty()) aNumOfLines++; } return aNumOfLines;


0

Just for reference, I had the same compiler error, but created it in a different way that wasn't immediately obvious to me. Out of habit I wrote: auto stream = fstream(output, iOS::out | iOS::binary); Which, of course, creates a temporary fstream object and copies it to stream. That worked in Xcode 6 using clang, but not for GCC 4.9.2.


0

I tried your code in ideone, changing to read from std::cin. It works as expected. The only way I could reproduce your issue was when I used a file that failed to open as input. So I guess adding the following will show what's going on: // after opening the file if (! inputFile) { std::cerr << "Failed to open file" << std::endl; return 1; ...


0

Since pos1 is < pos2, the result of pos1 - pos2 is a negative number. Since this is being stored in a variable of type size_t, which is an unsigned int, it becomes a huge positive number. substr is being called with a large number as 2nd parameter. In that case, the standard says "if the string is shorter, as many characters as possible are used". I ...


1

Since file I/O is slower than the time for formatting, I suggest formatting into a buffer, the block writing the buffer to the file. char text_buffer[1024]; unsigned int bytes_formatted = 0; for (unsigned int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) { int chars_formatted = snprintf(&text_buffer[bytes_formatted], 1024-bytes_formatted, ...


0

For one, I would avoid creating and destroying an std::stringstream for every call to your formatting function. Recall that the I/O manipulators are nothing but functions which return the stream itself. For example, a manipulator doing exactly what you indicated above, but without resorting to a temporary std::stringstream could look like: #include ...


0

Have a go at this solution. It opens file.txt and loads the entire file using ifstream into a string. Then it removes the comments with .find("/*") and .find("//") , erases the comments and writes the new data that it put in string back into the same file file.txt with ofstream . #include <iostream> #include <fstream> #include <string> ...


0

Here is another solution. It opens file.txt and loads the entire file into a string. Then it removes the comments and writes the new data in string back into file.txt. #include <iostream> #include <fstream> #include <string> using namespace std; int main(void) { string source; ifstream readFile("file.txt"); ...


0

ifstream myfile(menu_file); if (myfile.is_open()) { double file_bal; myfile >> file_bal; cout << "I HAVE READ IN THE BALANCE FROM THE FILE!\n"; while(!myfile.eof()) { string file_carName; getline(myfile, file_carName); string file_carColor; getline(myfile, file_carColor); double ...


0

Why don't you try getline(), which accepts a Delimiter as 3rd argument. string buffer; for (int c = 0; c < M; ++c) { getline(file, buffer, ';'); stringstream tmp(buffer); tmp>>*(A + N*c + r); } getline() will read until the next delimiter or newline or end of file


2

Given your input format... 1 ;2 ;3 ;4 ;5 ...your code... for (int c = 0; c < M; ++c) { file >> *(A + N*c + r); } ...will "eat" the first numeric value, then choke on the first ; separator. The simplest correction would be... char expected_semicolon; for (int c = 0; c < M; ++c) { if (c) { file >> expected_semicolon; ...


2

The problem with your C example: warning: format ‘%f’ expects argument of type ‘float*’, but argument 3 has type ‘double*’ [-Wformat=] Always and everywhere, turn on warnings (-Wall -Wextra) and do more error checking. Anyway, to fscanf into a double you need %lf instead of %f.


1

You should remove semicolon before converting std::string temp; file >> temp; std::replace( temp.begin(), temp.end(), ';', ' '); *(A + N*c + r) = std::stod( temp );


0

Ok, I managed to get the output. The problem I have now is to display all the values with the same registration/ ID. For some reason only the last row in the fstream .txt gets displayed when I enter "ABC123". The input .txt contains the following info. ABC123 400 DEC234 340 ABC123 500 GED345 600 ABC123 240 GEE600 120 GED345 230 GEE600 470 ABC123 120 ...


1

File system is designed to work with a wide variety of devices, including terminals, disk drives, tape drives etc. Even though each device is different, file system transforms each into a logical device called stream. Streams are device independent so same function can be used to write a disk file and a tape file. In more technical term stream provides a ...


0

You should try using a unicode version of getline or you could try adding ios::binary to your stream constructor flags. See this article for further info. However, if you read in a string like "\0" from stdin or a file, it should be treated as two separate characters: '\' and '0'. There is no additional processing that you have to do. Escaping characters ...


0

Since the files fileToCompare.txt and Library.txt are sorted alphabetically, your code can take advantage of that. Read a word from each file. If the two words are same, read the next words from the files. If the word from fileToCompare.txt is less than the word from Library.txt, keep the word from Library.txt and read the next word from fileToCompare.txt. ...


0

You should use a different algorithm / data structure for the comparison. The following example uses a std::set. It reads both files and writes the merged result into merged.txt: #include <iostream> #include <set> #include <string> #include <fstream> int main() { std::ifstream lib("Library.txt");; std::set<std::string> ...


0

You could just do something like this: string str; getline(cin, str); string currStr = ""; for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); i++) { if (str[i] != '\"') currStr += str[i]; } cout << currStr << "\n"; This won't work if there are double quotes within the text that you want to parse however.


1

find method of string returns std::string::npos on unsuccessful search , so you should write this line if(line.find("/*") < line.length()) as below: if(line.find("/*") != std::string::npos) Make similar changes and try.


0

You can use one ifstream variable for multiple files like this std::ifstream file("file_1"); // do something file.close(); file.clear(); file.open("file_2"); // do something EDIT: Putting this inside loop std::ifstream file; std::vector<std::string> filenames; for (int i = 0; i < filenames.size(); ++i) { file.open(filenames[i].c_str()); ...


2

You are passing a wide character C-string into a narrow character stream. There is no good automatic conversion for that, so you just get a pointer address. Use a std::wfstream instead.



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