Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

ios_base is in namespace std. Add prefix std:: before ios_base.


0

Reworked - problems solved classes.h #include<iostream> #include<string> #include<vector> #include<iterator> #include<fstream> class zviera; class farma{ private: std::string meno; std::pair<double, double> rozloha; std::vector < zviera > zvery; public: ...


1

No you can't. The typedef of std::ifstream::failure and std::ofstream::failure are both defined to be std::ios_base::failure. The best thing you could do is wrap the individual calls with try-catch: try { readFile.open(inputFileName); } catch(std::ifstream::failure &readErr) { } try { writeFile.open(outputFileName); } ...


0

The only way to handle exceptions from the two files separately would be to catch the exception and then check the failbit on the streams to determine which of them that failed: try { readFile.open(inputFileName); writeFile.open(outputFileName); function(readFile, writeFile); readFile.close(); writeFile.close(); } catch (const ...


3

You can't. A wide character stream is something completely different from a narrow character stream, and uses a completely different streambuf. If your class tries to use two different instances, they will have two different buffers, and two different, independent file positions; reading characters from one of the streams would not remove them from the ...


1

Your only option is to type-erase the stream with the technique used in boost::any and similar. Take a look at Boost.TypeErasure For the technique used to implement this kind of erasure, take a look here. It is the talk about value semantics and concept-based polymorphism. Example would be equivalent to: class ClassWithCommonInterface { ... }; ...


2

No. The only common base is std::ios_base, and that's useless. See http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/io for an overview of the hierarchy and http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/io/ios_base for that base-class.


3

I'm afraid those two classes hierarchies only meet in ios_base. You could probably create a template so the user can chose either one of the streams.


1

read and write operations are like memcpy, they make a binary image of the object, and don't follow pointers to subobjects. So you can only use them for trivially copyable objects. std::vector and std::string are NOT trivially copyable. (Objects containing these types are NOT trivially copyable either.) For those, you'll need to fetch and store the ...


1

std::fstream has not public copy constructors or assignment operator. So implicit generated copy constructor for queue class can not copy of file object. First, you can deny copying of queue object by explicit declaration of private copy constructor. Second solution is to include your fstream by pointer not by value. To prevent memory problems, use ...


3

The cause is in your regex and in how you specify the string literal: Before we make any fix to your regex, try printing out the string literal to the console: std::cout << "^[0,1]?\d{1}\/(([0-2]?\d{1})|([3][0,1]{1}))\/(([1]{1}[9]{1}[9]{1}\d{1})|([2-9]{1}\d{3}))$"; You will see that \ are missing, and <regex> can't see them. To specify \ in ...


3

Point should not care about files specifically. It can provide stream operators to input/output into any stream type. class Point{ public: Point() : x(0), y(0) {} Point(int x, int y) : x(x), y(y) {} friend istream& operator >> (istream& is, Point& point) { return is >> point.x >> point.y; } friend ...


3

A couple of things: First and foremost, you're not reading line by line, so there is no reason to assume that you advance the number of characters in a line each time through the loop. If you want to read line by line, use std::getline, and then extract the fields from the line, either using std::istringstream or some other method. The result of tellg is ...


3

C++ is at lower level than scripts. open does not mean START. You will have to execute a batch script with START C:\Users\Filepath\image1.jpg. Or to learn many more libraries to do that in C++...


2

First, std::ofstream imagetest; is using the kernel to open the file for reading the file data.. this is probably what is corrupting the file from "opening" when you double click on it in windows if you want to have windows open the image for viewing using the default application then you need a different method call because ofstream.open is not what you ...


3

ofstream stands for “output file stream”. In addition to creating files that doesn’t exist, it also erases the contents of files that do exist. So you are opening an existing file for writing, and blowing away its contents in the process. You probably want ifstream, “input file stream”, for reading. If you want to “open” the file in the sense of launching ...


0

If you open a file stream for WRITE, then it will wipe all the content of that file, just like when you do that on a txt file. So you would always want to open the stream for read mode if you don't want that to happen


0

Warning: everything that follows is implementation specific and non portable! With my implementation, on Linux at least, C++ iostreams seem to be a wrapper around the lower-level C functions in stdio.h. So -- again, on my implementation -- it's possible to get read the errno value after something goes wrong with a std::fstream: #include <iostream> ...


1

If you want to read a binary value from a stream, you need this: template < typename T > void SomeClass::ReadBinary(T& Res) { m_Fstream.read(&Res, sizeof(Res)); } There is no need to allocate vectors of anything and no need to reinterpret cast anything. This is for std::fstream only. Do not use std::wfstream for binary input, use only ...


0

Ignore the issue of minions of different dimensions for a moment. Assuming you have some character that represents transparency (or not-part-of-the-feature characters, e.g. white space), you can assign each feature a depth, iterate over the selected feature files from background to foreground, and write each non-transparent character in the correct position ...


0

The issue was due to this line: std::fstream ifInput(pathSrc.string().c_str()); The file I was reading was partially binary, so: std::fstream ifInput(pathSrc.string().c_str(), std::fstream::in | std::fstream::binary); resolved the issus.


2

#inlcude<fstream> change this to #include<fstream> you just got a typo but what kind of terrible IDE are you using that does not show you this immediately?


0

In scrambleletters_in_file() you are outputting strings to cout which is standard output (console by default). This line: new_dictionary<<scrambleletters_in_file(); means "calculate the result of function scrambleletters_in_file and write it to new_dictionary". And its result is void, so the code doesn't even compile. What you need is to pass the ...


2

Seems like the escape sequences are working. \a is the beep character, \ris carriage return. You should escape your backslash (\\) like so: string path = "c:\\assets\\rock.txt";


0

The below will work: #include <iostream> #include <fstream> #include <string> using namespace std; int main () { string line; string mystring; ifstream myfile ("example.txt"); // Need to be in the directory where this program resides. if (myfile.is_open()) { while ( getline (myfile,line) ) // Get one line ...


4

int i = 0; string line; while (getline(infile, line)) { outfile << (i++) << " " << line << "\n"; }


1

try this : #include<iostream> #include<fstream.h> using namespace std; int main(){ ifstream file("d:\\data.txt"); string content((std::istreambuf_iterator<char>(file)), std::istreambuf_iterator<char>()); cout<<content; getchar(); return 0; } here now content variable contains the whole data from your file. ...


0

ifstream fin("test.txt"); if (inputFile.fail()) //check for file open failure { cout << "Error opening file" << endl; cout << "Note that the program will halt" << endl;//error prompt } int flag=0; while(!fin.eof()) { char ch=(char)fin.get(); flag++; break; } if (flag>0) cout << "File is not empty" << endl; else ...


4

Use peek like following if ( inputFile.peek() == std::ifstream::traits_type::eof() ) { // Empty File }


1

If "empty" means that the length of the file is zero (i.e. no characters at all) then just find the length of the file and see if it's zero: inputFile.seekg (0, is.end); int length = is.tellg(); if (length == 0) { // do your error handling }


0

I would open the file at the end and see what that position is using tellg(): std::ifstream ifs("my file", std::ios::ate); // std::ios::ate means open at end if(ifs.tellg() == 0) { // file is empty } The function tellg() returns the read (get) position of the file and we opened the file with the read (get) position at the end using std::ios::ate. So ...


0

Just try this code this code will help you #include <fstream> #include <iostream> #include <string> //#include <sstream> using namespace std; int main() { fstream file("main.txt"); file << "45634w6\n"; file << "dtusrjt\n"; file.close(); file.open("main.txt"); string line; while (!file.fail()) { getline(file, ...


1

There are several issues, but the main one is that you're trying to reuse ss (which should properly be an std::istringstream). It's possible to do so, but it's fairly difficult to get right, since streams hold a lot of state which needs reinitializing. (In this case, the stream memorizes that it has seen end of file, and doesn't do anything else until that ...


1

You can try following for your inner while loop ss << newLine; while( ss >> newInput ) { //.... Your logic, // might need little update oldInput = newInput; } ss.clear( ); // clear the flags !


1

In general, the behavior of an istream is not set in stone. There exist multiple flags to change how any istream behaves, which you can read about here. In general, you should not really care where the internal pointer is; that's why you are using a stream in the first place. Otherwise you'd just dump the whole file into a string or equivalent and manually ...


1

After extraction, the stream pointer will be placed on the whitespace that caused extraction to terminate (or other illegal character, in which case the failbit will also be set). This doesn't really matter though, since you aren't responsible for skipping over that whitespace. The next extraction will ignore whitespaces until it finds valid data. In ...


2

The operator>> leaves the current position in the file one character beyond the last character extracted (which may be at end of file). Which doesn't necessarily help with your problem; there can be spaces or tabs after the last value in a line. You could skip forward reading each character and checking whether it is a white space other than '\n', ...


1

According to cppreference.com the standard operator>> delegates the work to std::num_get::get. This takes an input iterator. One of the properties of an input iterator is that you can dereference it multiple times without advancing it. Thus when a non-numeric character is detected, the iterator will be left pointing to that character.


3

Please never loop on eof() it is almost always wrong. Try this: ifstream ifs("ifile.txt", ios_base::in); char b; int letters[26] = {}; int numbers[10] = {}; while(ifs.get(b))) // much better !! { cout << b << endl; } ifs.close(); In explanation: There are several problems with using eof(). EOF is only triggered after you try to read ...


3

Read one character at a time and inspect it. Have a variable that maintains the number currently being read, and a flag telling you if you are in the middle of processing a number. If the current character is a digit then multiple the current number by 10 and add the digit to the number (and set the "processing a number" flag). If the current character ...


1

Depends. If your stream isn't cached, there might be a noticeable difference between the two versions. If for some reason you don't open a file but rather a memory stream that is extremely fast, the multiple calls to get might be slower. That, of course, also depends on how getline is implemented. So there is a theoretical difference. Of course, to see if ...



Top 50 recent answers are included