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103

There's typically two levels of buffering involved: Internal buffers Operating system buffers The internal buffers are buffers created by the runtime/library/language that you're programming against and is meant to speed things up by avoiding system calls for every write. Instead, when you write to a file object, you write into its buffer, and whenever ...


41

fflush() works on FILE* , it just flushes the internal buffers in the FILE* of your application out to the OS. fsync works on a lower level, it tells the OS to flush its buffers to the physical media. OSs heavily caches data you write to a file. If the OS enforced every write to hit the drive, things would be very slow. fsync(among other things) allows ...


17

No. Look at libeatmydata, and this presentation: Eat My Data: How Everybody Gets File IO Wrong http://www.oscon.com/oscon2008/public/schedule/detail/3172 by Stewart Smith from MySql. In case it is offline/no longer available, I keep a copy of it: The video here The presentation slides (online version of slides)


13

POSIX defines that the rename function must be atomic: http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009695399/functions/rename.html So if you rename(A, B), under no circumstances should you ever see a state with the file in both directories or neither directory. There will always be exactly one, no matter what you do with fsync() or whether the system ...


9

Android will do the sync when it needs to -- such as when the screen turns off, shutting down the device, etc. If you are just looking at "normal" operation, explicit sync by applications is never needed. The problem comes when the user pulls the battery out of their device (or does a hard reset of the kernel), and you want to ensure you don't lose any ...


8

Kernel 3.1.* is actually doing the sync, 3.0.18 is faking it. Your code does 1,000 synchronized writes. Since you truncate the file, each write also enlarges the file. So you actually have 2,000 write operations. Typical hard drive write latency is about 20 milliseconds per I/O. So 2,000*20 = 40,000 milliseconds or 40 seconds. So it seems about right, ...


7

The issue is in the way you're attempting to time an I/O write. You semantically want to measure the wall-clock time between I/O record writes, but you are using the C library function clock, which measures CPU execution time and not total time elapsed. Use clock_gettime with a clock selection of CLOCK_MONOTONIC or, ideally, CLOCK_MONOTONIC_RAW (the latter ...


7

I guess you need to call fflush() to flush the changed to the file system. See also difference between fsync() and fflush().


6

Because the operating system may not do so. The flush operation forces the file data into the file cache in RAM, and from there it's the OS's job to actually send it to the disk.


6

Unfortunately Dave’s answer is wrong. Not all POSIX systems might even have a durable storage. And if they do, it is still “allowed” to be hosed after a system crash. For those systems a no-op fsync() makes sense, and such fsync() is explicitly allowed under POSIX. It is also legal for the file to be recoverable in the old directory, the new directory, ...


5

Unfortunately, looking through the standard there is nothing provided by basic_filebuf or any of the basic_[io]?fstream class templates to allow you to extract the underlying OS file descriptor (in the way that fileno() does for C stdio I/O). Nor is there an open() method or constructor that takes such a file descriptor as a parameter (which would allow you ...


5

Yes, it is guaranteed by the operating system. Even if the modifications have not made it to disk yet, the OS uses its buffer cache to reflect file modifications and guarantees atomicity level for reads and writes, to ALL processes. So not only your process, but any other process, would be able to see the changes. As to fsync(), it only instructs the ...


5

jnml@fsc-r630:~/src/tmp/SO/16797380$ ls -l celkem 4 -rw-rw-r-- 1 jnml jnml 186 kvě 29 07:54 main.go jnml@fsc-r630:~/src/tmp/SO/16797380$ cat main.go package main import ( "log" "os" ) func main() { f, err := os.Create("foo.bar") if err != nil { log.Fatal(err) } if err := f.Truncate(1e7); err ...


4

You're seeing an exponential decrease in speed on the sync runs because these aren't purely sequential workloads as you believe. Since you're starting with a new file each time, your writes are growing the file and the metadata needs to be updated in the filesystem. That requires multiple seeks, and as the file grows the seeks from the end of the file to the ...


4

Your test shows exponential decrease in speed on the sync runs because you're recreating the file each time. In this case it's no longer a purely sequential write - every write also grows the file, which requires multiple seeks to update the file metadata in the filesystem. If you ran all of these jobs using a pre-existing fully allocated file, you'd see a ...


4

If you're able to use Boost, try a file_descriptor_sink based stream, eg.: boost::filesystem::path filePath("some-file"); boost::iostreams::stream<boost::iostreams::file_descriptor_sink> file(filePath); // Write some stuff to file. // Ensure the buffer's written to the OS ... file.flush(); // Tell the OS to sync it with the real device. // ...


4

When you invoke the syncfs(2) syscall, the kernel calls a sync_filesystem() on the superblock of the file system to which the fd belongs. If the file system in question implements the .sync_fs superblock operation, it gets called. FUSE doesn't and hence sync_filesystem() for FUSE just calls __sync_blockdev() on /dev/fuse, which would sync all dirty pages ...


3

Found the reason. File system barriers enabled by default in ext3 for Linux kernel 3.1 (http://kernelnewbies.org/Linux_3.1). After disable barriers, it becomes much faster.


3

Is it necessary to fsync() after every file? You may have better luck letting the OS decide when a good time is to write out all enqueued images to the SD card (amortizing the startup cost of manipulating the SD card filesystem over many images, rather than incurring it for every image). Can you provide some more details about your platform? Slow I/O ...


3

You cannot portably do fsync() on a file descriptor open for reading, at all. In Linux, fsync() is documented as generating EBADF if the descriptor is not in write mode.


3

Note that linux's and mac os's fsync and fdatasync are incorrect by default. Windows is correct by default, but can emulate linux for benchmarking purposes. Also, fdatasync issues multiple disk writes if you append to the end of a file, since it needs to update the file inode with the new length. If you want to have one write per commit, your best bet is ...


3

Try to open the file with O_DIRECT and do the caching in application level. We met the similar issue when we were implementing a PVR (Personal Video Record) feature in STB Box. The O_DIRECT trick satisfied our need finaly.(*) Without O_DIRECT. The data of write() will firstly be cached in the kernel buffer and then be flushed to the media when you call ...


3

For all of these, is it possible for data to be lost (after the write or sync has returned) or corrupted by a power failure, panic, crash, or anything else? Absolutely. Does fsync even guarantee that the data's written? This says not, but I don't know if things have changed since then. No. The answer is device dependent and likely filesystem ...


3

If you are using unix, then you can create a sparse file very quickly. A sparse file is filled with zero (ascii NUL) and doesn't actually take up the disk space until it is written to, but reads correctly. package main import ( "log" "os" ) func main() { size := int64(10 * 1024 * 1024) fd, err := os.Create("output") if err != nil { ...


3

If you don't want the fsync to return immediately, then you can remove the async option and it will become a blocking operation. But if you don't want it to be blocking, you can use db.currentOp from the shell to query the current state of the fsync. If you want to get that information from Perl, you can use the technique I outlined in this answer. ...


3

Unmount the device before you remove it. For a non-journalled filesystem like VFAT, there is no guarantee that the filesystem will be in a consistent state on disk while it is mounted.


2

I would consider another approach. You may use an indipendent process (multiprocessing.Process) and using two queues to communicate with it (multiprocessing.Queue) one for the input and the other one for the output. Example on starting the process: import multiprocessing def processWorker(input, result): work = input.get() print work ...


2

fsync() synchronizes cache and disk. Since the data is already in the cache, it will be read from there instead of from disk.


2

It's not a bug, it's a feature. Ext3 is a journaled file system. data=ordered means you are asking for the changes to the file system to be written in the order they are made. So, when you are asking to sync the changes to a particular file you have to commit all the previous changes, whether to that files or others, or you are breaking the directive to ...



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