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7

I don't have an explanation, but the documentation is here.


5

There's several reasons that the function tracer may freeze. It's a very invasive tracer (traces almost all functions of the kernel). One issue is if it traces an internal function like disabling interrupts. This would cause it to go into an infinite loop. Now I assume you have an ARM device if you are running Android. Depending on the configuration some of ...


3

Parsing comments is quite hard in practice. Parsing kernel code is not specially easy. First, you should understand precisely what a system call is in the linux kernel, and how applications use them. The Linux Assembly HowTo has good explanations. Then, you should understand the organization of the Linux kernel. I strongly suggest reading some good books ...


3

The problem is that those functions are annotated with __init and __devinit, which are black listed by ftrace function tracer. Why? Because as module init functions (or kernel init functions) they are loaded during initialization and removed when the initialization is complete. Every function that ftrace traces is kept in a special compact table. Currently, ...


1

Take the following script, you can use it to ftrace any command you want. Taken from here, I've modified slightly, you can get traced output at /tmp/mytrace.txt. Example usage: script.sh cp file1 file2 #!/bin/bash DPATH="/sys/kernel/debug/tracing" PID=$$ TEMP="/tmp/mytrace.txt" ## Quick basic checks [ `id -u` -ne 0 ] && { echo "needs to be ...


1

Obviously, this would be much easier with built-in uprobes on kernels 3.5+; but given that uprobes for my kernel 2.6.38 is a very deep-going patch (which I couldn't really isolate in a separate kernel module, so as to avoid patching the kernel), here is what I can note for a standalone module on 2.6.38. (Since I'm still unsure of many things, I would still ...


1

Ftrace is a good option and has a good documentation.


1

use WARN_ON() It will print some trace of function called that. For time tracing i think you should use time stamp showing in kernel log or use jiffies counter


1

Also systemtap will be useful in your situation. Systemtap is some kind of tool in which you can write code like in scripting languages. It is very powerful, but if you want to only know a time of execution particular function ftrace would be better, but if you need very advanced tool to analyze e.g, performance problems in the kernel space, it may be very ...


1

Here are a couple of options you may have depending on the version of the kernel you are on: Systemtap - this is the ideal way check the examples that come with the stap, you may have something ready with minimal modifications to do. Oprofile - if you are using older versions of the kernel, stap gives better precision compared to oprofile. debugfs with ...


1

If the function's execution time is interesting because it makes subsidiary calls to slow/blocking functions, then statement-by-statement tracing could work for you, without too much distortion due to the "probe effect" overheads of the instrumentation itself. probe kernel.statement("function_name@dir/file.c:*") { println(tid(), " ", gettimeofday_us(), " ", ...


1

The concept of ‘non-blocking’ doesn't apply to command-line tools. However, you could run an instance of cat in the background by appending an ampersand to the invocation, like so: cat /sys/kernel/debug/tracing/trace_pipe & Now, the command returns immediately, and every time a line is readable from the file, it gets printed to the terminal (and ...


1

I have limited experience with ftrace, although I have used it for for function stack traces and latency issues. (People with more experience can possibly suggest) Its pretty much the same experience using trace-cmd and kernelshark. However, if you want to trace syscalls, function params, kernel APIs and return values etc. within the kernel space a better ...


1

Give "STRACE" a shot. It monitors the interaction betn userspace and kernel. A sample output can be found here : http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2011/11/strace-examples/ Alternatively, Since you are saying specific system calls, i am assuming you are interested in only a couple of them. If you have to use FTRACE alone, you can add your own trace event in ...


1

http://lwn.net/Articles/370423/ http://www.mjmwired.net/kernel/Documentation/trace/ftrace.txt these links might help. first is thing i found by googling. second is ftrace documentation


1

Well, now it is sure: the format belongs to ftrace tool. Android atrace is an extension of ftrace build to facilitate configuration. The official documentation from ftrace, shows that this output format can directly be produced by it in the following way: root@adroid:# echo 1 > /sys/kernel/debug/tracing/events/sched/sched_switch/enable root@adroid:# ...


1

Dynamic patching is used as a way to minimize overhead when tracing isn't activated. The overhead of the PMU-based hardware counters should depend on how many different events you're sampling, and how often. It's probably low enough for you to find an acceptable configuration, depending on what you want. I would try enabling whatever information collection ...


1

First you need to get the function name right - e.g. the function name to use for tracing open syscalls is sys_open. To do this the "proper" way, it's necessary to have function_graph support in the kernel. On the x86 architecture this depends on CC_OPTIMIZE_FOR_SIZE being disabled, but on x86_64 it doesn't. In my case I didn't bother to compile a custom ...



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