Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

690

The $ operator is for avoiding parenthesis. Anything appearing after it will take precedence over anything that comes before. For example, let's say you've got a line that reads: putStrLn (show (1 + 1)) If you want to get rid of those parenthesis, any of the following lines would also do the same thing: putStrLn (show $ 1 + 1) putStrLn $ show (1 + 1) ...


112

They have different types and different definitions: infixr 9 . (.) :: (b -> c) -> (a -> b) -> (a -> c) (f . g) x = f (g x) infixr 0 $ ($) :: (a -> b) -> a -> b f $ x = f x ($) is intended to replace normal function application but at a different precedence to help avoid parentheses. (.) is for composing two functions together to ...


98

I guess I can answer this from authority. Is there a reason for using the books way that is much better than using all ($) symbols? There's no special reason. Bryan and I both prefer to reduce line noise. . is quieter than $ As a result, the book uses the f . g . h $ x syntax


69

Also note that ($) is the identity function specialised to function types. The identity function looks like this: id :: a -> a id x = x While ($) looks like this: ($) :: (a -> b) -> (a -> b) ($) = id Note that I've intentionally added extra parentheses in the type signature. Uses of ($) can usually be eliminated by adding parenthesis ...


69

Put simply, . is function composition, just like in math: f (g x) = (f . g) x In your case, you are creating a new function, sumEuler that could also be defined like this: sumEuler x = sum (map euler (mkList x)) The style in your example is called "point-free" style -- the arguments to the function are omitted. This makes for clearer code in many ...


65

I understand how you feel. I found function composition to be quite difficult to grasp at first too. What helped me grok the matter were type signatures. Consider: (*) :: Num x => x -> x -> x (+) :: Num y => y -> y -> y (.) :: (b -> c) -> (a -> b) -> a -> c Now when you write (*) . (+) it is actually the same as (.) (*) ...


62

The dot operator (i.e. (.)) is the function composition operator. It is defined as follows: infixr 9 . (.) :: (b -> c) -> (a -> b) -> a -> c f . g = \x -> f (g x) As you can see it takes a function of type b -> c and another function of type a -> b and returns a function of type a -> c (i.e. which applies the result of the ...


48

($) allows functions to be chained together without adding parentheses to control evaluation order: Prelude> head (tail "asdf") 's' Prelude> head $ tail "asdf" 's' The compose operator (.) creates a new function without specifying the arguments: Prelude> let second x = head $ tail x Prelude> second "asdf" 's' Prelude> let second = head . ...


39

They are indeed equivalent: Keep in mind that the $ operator does, essentially, nothing. f $ x evaluates to f x. The purpose of $ is its fixity behavior: right-associative and minimal precedence. Removing $ and using parentheses for grouping instead of infix precedence, the code snippets look like this: k = a (b (c (value))) and k = (a . b . c) value ...


32

The short and sweet version: ($) calls the function which is its left hand argument on the value which is its right hand argument. (.) composes the function which is its left hand argument on the function which is its right hand argument.


29

f(g(x)) is in mathematics : f ∘ g (x) in haskell : ( f . g ) (x)


28

Why is Haskell inferring such a specific type for the function? GHCi is using type defaulting, to infer a more specific type from a set of possibles. You can avoid this easily by disabling the monomorphism restriction, Prelude> :set -XNoMonomorphismRestriction Prelude> let removeall = filter . (/=) Prelude> :t removeall removeall :: (Eq a) ...


28

Let's take a step back for a moment. You have two types of functions, some pure with types of the form a -> b, and some monadic of type a -> m b. To avoid confusion, let's also stick with right-to-left composition. If you prefer to read left-to-right, just reverse the order of the functions and replace (<=<) with (>=>), and (.) with ...


27

The runST $ do { ... } pattern is so common, and the fact that it normally wouldn't type-check is so annoying, that GHC included some ST-specific type-checking hacks to make it work. Those hacks are probably firing here for the ($) version, but not the (.) version.


27

The short answer is that type inference doesn't always work with higher-rank types. In this case, it is unable to infer the type of (.), but it type checks if we add an explicit type annotation: > :m + Control.Monad.ST > :set -XRankNTypes > :t (((.) :: ((forall s0. ST s0 a) -> a) -> (a -> forall s1. ST s1 a) -> a -> a) runST return) ...


22

(.) . (.) is the composition of the composition operator with itself. If we look at ((.) . (.)) f g x we can evaluate that a few steps, first we parenthesise, ((((.) . (.)) f) g) x then we apply, using (foo . bar) arg = foo (bar arg): ~> (((.) ((.) f)) g) x ~> (((.) f) . g) x ~> ((.) f) (g x) ~> f . g x More principled, (.) :: (b -> ...


21

In the presence of non-strict evaluation, right-associativity is useful. Let's look at a very dumb example: foo :: Int -> Int foo = const 5 . (+3) . (`div` 10) Ok, what happens when this function is evaluated at 0 when . is infixr? foo 0 => (const 5 . ((+3) . (`div` 10))) 0 => (\x -> const 5 (((+3) . (`div` 10)) x)) 0 => const 5 (((+3) . ...


21

a(_).compose(b(_)) expands to x => { a(x).compose(y => b(y) }. Hence the error. What you want is (x => a(x)).compose(y => b(y)). Adding a pair of parentheses fixes this. scala> (a(_)).compose(b(_: String)) res56: String => java.lang.String = <function1> scala> res56("hello") res57: java.lang.String = helloahemumm But since a ...


20

It depends on which monad you're working with, and how its (>>=) operator is defined. In the case of Maybe, (>>=) is strict in its first argument, as Daniel Fischer explained. Here are some results for a handful of other monads. > :set -XNoMonomorphismRestriction > let foo = (const (return 42) <=< undefined <=< return) 3 > ...


20

My preferred implementation for this is fmap . fmap :: (Functor f, Functor f1) => (a -> b) -> f (f1 a) -> f (f1 b) If only because it is fairly easy to remember. When instantiating f and f1 to (->) c and (->) d respectively you get the type (a -> b) -> (c -> d -> a) -> c -> d -> b which is the type of (.) . (.) ...


19

I'd add that in f . g $ x, f . g is a meaningful syntactic unit. Meanwhile, in f $ g $ x, f $ g is not a meaningful unit. a chain of $ is arguably more imperative -- first get the result of g of x, then do f to it, then do foo to it, then etc. Meanwhile a chain of . is arguably more declarative, and in some sense closer to a dataflow centric view -- compose ...


19

The bind for Maybe is strict in the first argument. Just v >>= f = f v Nothing >>= f = Nothing So when you try Just v >>= undefined >>= \_ -> Nothing you hit undefined v >>= \_ -> Nothing and the implementation needs to find out whether undefined v is Nothing or Just something to see which equation of (>>=) ...


19

There are multiple ways to do it, but they're all somewhat awkward. ((+3).) . (*) ≡ fmap (+3) . (*) ≡ curry $ (+3) . uncurry (*) ≡ \l r -> l*r + 3 Oh, wait, this was the signature where there's also a compact definition, guess what it's called... ((.).(.)) (+3) (*) I'd argue that the lambda solution, being most explicit, is rather the best here. ...


19

I'd say you're not going to beat comp = foldr (.) id Why? Well we have a list of things and we're trying to reduce it in a right associative way. If you look at the implementations of and, sum, maximum and similar, you'll see that this is how they're implemented in the standard library, I don't think you get more idiomatic than that :) Tangent: I ...


18

No, it wouldn't be possible. For example, f1 = (+ 1) . (+ 1) :: Int -> Int is the same function as f2 = subtract 1 . (+ 3) :: Int -> Int and referential transparency demands that equals can be substituted for equals, so if compositionSplit were possible, it would need to produce the same result for f1 and f2, since that is the same function, ...


17

f >>> g from Control.Arrow.


17

(Edit 1: I missed a couple components of your question the first time around; see the bottom of my answer.) The way to think about this sort of statement is to look at the types. The form of argument that you have is called a syllogism; however, I think you are mis-remembering something. There are many different kinds of syllogisms, and yours, as far as I ...


17

It is also worth noting that if you don't assign a name to the expression, typechecker seems to avoid type defaulting: Prelude> :t filter . (/=) filter . (/=) :: (Eq a) => a -> [a] -> [a]


17

One application that is useful and took me some time to figure out from the very short description at learn you a haskell: Since: f $ x = f x and parenthesizing the right hand side of an expression containing an infix operator converts it to a prefix function, one can write ($ 3) (4+) analogous to (++", world") "hello". Why would anyone do this? For ...


15

Break up the line, and use the layout: mynub = unsort . map head . groupBy ((==) `on` fst) . sortBy (comparing fst) . rememberPosition



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible