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2

This is wrong: UserEWord.W1=new char; ... cin.getline(UserEWord.W1,'\n'); cin is of type std::istream, so the method you're actually calling is std::istream::getline(). As you can see from the documentation, the first argument must be a pointer to (what should be) an array of chars, and the second argument n must be the size of the array that you permit ...


0

A metaprogramming approach. First, some pointer traits that try to preserve calling convention information: template<class...>types {using type=types;}; enum class calling_convention { cdecl, clrcall, stdcall, fastcall, thiscall, vectorcall, }; template<class Sig> struct signature_properties; template<class R, class...Args> ...


1

Partial specialization as shown in @Wintermutes post is possible. However, what you're trying should be possible without it: template <typename func> class Entry{ public: PVOID Address; template <typename... Args> auto operator()(Args&&... args) -> decltype( ((func*) Address)(std::forward<Args>(args)...) ) { ...


4

You can do it with a specialization like this: // Entry has one template argument template<typename func> class Entry; // and if it's a function type, this specialization is used as best fit. template<typename ret, typename... args> class Entry<ret(args...)>{ public: PVOID Address; ret operator()(args... a){ return ...


1

I would expect the cast to be safe, iff the pointer is cast to the correct type before calling. This also assumes that they are all declared with the same calling-convention decorations. I've done this here in my operator constructor function which stores various function types in a "generic" form, but they are cast to the correct type in operator execute ...


0

I guess you answered your own question: no it is not safe. If you are casting voidarg (both from and to) you are actually saying to the compiler you know what you are doing. This is a flexibility the compilers give you, but you have to pay the price of being responsible for the correct casting.


1

funcptr and fptr are both aliases for function pointers, yes, but they could be pointers to functions having different argument types, depending on the definition of int_alias. The cast is dangerous if int_alias is typedef'd anything other than int (or the equivalent signed int). The pointer value is preserved by the cast regardless, but calling the ...


2

There are two problems with your code: both in number of arguments and argument type: vector<node*>::iterator referIt = find_if (open.begin(), open.end(), Isinit); bool Isinit(const node &nm, const node &ref); find_if takes a unary predicate. It will call it on every element until it finds an element for which the predicate returns ...


0

Here is a possible implementation of find_if from cppreference.com: template<class InputIt, class UnaryPredicate> InputIt find_if(InputIt first, InputIt last, UnaryPredicate p) { for (; first != last; ++first) { if (p(*first)) { return first; } } return last; } It seems like you have a vector of node*, thus, ...


2

At some point recently, each function was given its own, distinct type for... reasons that I don't recall. Upshot is that you need to give the compiler a hint (note the type on functions): fn foo() -> isize { 1 } fn bar() -> isize { 2 } fn main() { let functions: Vec<fn() -> isize> = vec![foo, bar]; println!("foo() = {}, ...


2

Short answer: both are correct. The signature of pthread_create is: int pthread_create(pthread_t *thread, const pthread_attr_t *attr, void *(*start_routine) (void *), void *arg); So start_routine is a function pointer that takes a void * argument and returns void *. Back to your question, I assume thread_start is the name of the ...


0

(Question was answered in a comment. See Question with no answers, but issue solved in the comments ) @SuperCow wrote: Does this help? Procedure Pointer, Derived Type The OP wrote: Yes! This was the trick.


5

I'm not entirely sure that using function pointer in this case is particularly much better than for example a big switch statement. However, the reason you can't call your member function is that you are not passing your object to the function. You need this; (this->*fmap[opcode])(); Another option is to use static/free function pointers, like this: ...


5

This expression: fmap[opcode] gives you a pointer to a member function. You can't just call that - it needs the class instance too. But you're actually calling it from a class method itself - so this is the instance you're looking for: (this->*fmap[opcode])(); Note that if you want to avoid that bit of syntax and you're using C++11, you can change ...


0

This particular problem is typically caused by interfacing with C callbacks (the `void* argument is a giveaway). The solution is to realize that in these cases, you control the void*. Thus: class AS { int x; public: AS(int xx) { x = xx; } void ww() { std::cerr << "AS::ww " << this << std::endl; ...


2

The difference is the same difference you have between references and pointers in general, they are two different things meant for different uses. A pointer is literally the address of something in memory (and therefore what it points to can be changed), a reference might be implemented the same way under the hood (and often is) but it's meant to to obscure ...


1

Yes, there is. By reference: Return by reference values that you've passed into the function by reference. Note that you can't return by reference a local variable that you've created in the function and that will go out of scope once the function returns. By address: Return by address variables that you've passed into the function by address. Note that ...


4

IIRC some implementations support to keep such closures in objects, but it isn't standard compliant. [expr.mptr.oper]/6: If the result of .* or ->* is a function, then that result can be used only as the operand for the function call operator (). However, as of C++11 (which you must be using since you're using auto), use std::bind or a lambda: ...


0

Another solution without using lambda is to derive from enable_shared_from_this and pass shared_from_this in getSomeFunc method: class X : public enable_shared_from_this<X> { public: X(string name):name_(name) { cout << "ctor " << name_ << endl; } ~X() { cout << "dtor " << name_ << endl; ...


3

Take a look at the below code snippet which will show how to access function pointers within structure.Please make a note that C is case sensitive. In your code you tend to just ignore it. Question: What is correct way to access function pointer which is memeber of another structure ? struct FeatureStruct { void (*Init)(); }; ...


1

Sulution 1) Using weak_ptr + lambda (almost the same as from b4hand, but it won't force your class beeing alive) Inherit your class from std::enable_shared_from_this class X : public enable_shared_from_this<X> and change getSomeFunc to something like this: SomeFunc getSomeFunc() { weak_ptr<X> weak = shared_from_this(); return [weak, ...


3

Your object is being held by a shared_ptr, so you can use a lambda to close over the shared_ptr: auto func = [ptr](const int &p){ ptr->someMethod(p); }; You'll need to use shared_from_this to get ptr within the class. Here's a full example that works: #include <iostream> #include <functional> #include <memory> using namespace ...


1

You can create a class that holds a function pointer and a shared_ptr to the object. The shared_ptr to the object guarantees the object won't be destroyed until your function class is destroyed.


-1

Found an answer here: http://meh.schizofreni.co/programming/magic/2013/01/23/function-pointer-from-lambda.html It converts lambda pointer to void* and convert back when needed. to void*: auto voidfunction = new decltype(to_function(lambda))(to_function(lambda)); from void*: auto function = static_cast< std::function*>( voidfunction);


0

I think using an abstract class is more elegant, like this: // Something.java public abstract class Something { public abstract void test(); public void usingCallback() { System.out.println("This is before callback method"); test(); System.out.println("This is after callback method"); } } // CallbackTest.java ...


0

I am working on some student registration system problem. 1. there are three different kinds of student types 2. the undergrad student pass the exam with 50, and master and phd pass with 65 3. Undergraduates must complete 40 courses, MEng students 5 and PhD students 2. These are the three functionalities I need to implement. ' Below it is the struct for the ...


2

There are a few common ways to do generic-ish programming in C. I would expect to use one or more of the following methods in trying to accomplish the task you've described. MACROS: One is to use macros. In this example, MAX looks like a function, but operate on anything that can be compared with the ">" operator: #define MAX(a,b) ((a) > (b) ? (a) : ...


3

Here's a very brief example using macros to accomplish something like this. This can get hairy pretty quick, but if done correctly, you can maintain complete static type safety. #include <stdlib.h> #include <stdio.h> #define list_type(type) struct __list_##type /* A generic list node that keeps 'type' by value. */ #define ...


2

You can add a student_type field to the struct struct student { char *s_name; struct student_id s_id; /** Number of references to this student. */ unsigned int s_ref; /** Transcript (singly-linked list, NULL terminator). */ struct transcript_entry *s_transcript; /** Whether or not this ...


4

If you look at the error closely: error: cannot convert ‘A::method1’ from type ‘void (A::)(int)’ to type ‘void (*)(int)’ You'll see that the types are different. That's because class methods do not have the same type as raw function - they need that extra object to get called on. There is no way to get that code to compile since calling method1 ...


2

Make run7 a function template so it can use any callable object. template <typename F> void run7(F f) { f(7); } Then, call it from method2 using a lambda function. void method2() { run7([=](int arg){this->method1(arg)];}); } Update You can use a better version of run7 that uses universal references and perfect forwarding to make it ...


0

Use a static member function, like this: class A { static void method1(int a) { cout<<a<<endl; } void method2() { run7(method1); } }; The problem is that without static, you do not have an object, which possesions this member function. With the static keyword, the function is "created" once for all ...


0

As long as the lambda doesn't use capture clause (i.e. doesn't capture variables from above it), it can be used as a function pointer. VC compiler internally generates anonymous functions with different calling convention so that it can be used without issues.


2

There is no platform-independent way to automatically do this in C. There are a few options available to you, though. Many operating systems support specific functionality to look up the address of a function given its name. In Windows, you can use LoadLibrary and GetProcAddress to do this, for example. This makes your code less portable, but might be what ...


1

In the case of a non-capturing lambda, using a function pointer would be faster than using std::function. This is because std::function is a far more general beast and uses type-erasure to store the function object passed to it. It achieves this through type-erasure, implying that you end up with a call to operator() being virtual. OTOH, non-capturing ...


2

std::function is more generic - you can store in it any callable object with correct signature (function pointer, method pointer, object with operator()) and you can construct std::function using std::bind. Function pointer can only accept functions with correct signature but might be slightly faster and might generate slightly smaller code.


0

Made the mistake of not including as I couldn't see it mentioned in anybody's code examples but it's probably just me being bad at C++. Not going to accept my own answer, but thought I'd post my code just in the interests of anybody who might find it useful. #include <iostream> #include <vector> #include <functional> using namespace ...


0

VS 2103 has std::function, std::bind and lambdas. Simply use them.


1

The syntax for calling a member function pointer f if x is a pointer is (x->*f)(); Since the name of your member pointer (in _tmain) is abcObj->fp, you need to use (abcObj->*(abcObj->fp))(); You can simplify by adding another member to Abc, like void callFP() { (*fp)(); }


1

The first error can be fixed by removing parentheses: fp = &Dllclas::dllFunc; // This will compile The second problem is harder to fix: recall that in order to call a member function you need two things: A pointer to the function, and An object on which you call the function. Therefore, you need a "target" object of type Dllclas as well: Dllclas ...


1

When you have polymorphism and using virtual functions, you need an object. So your code: void RunTest(){ for (int i = 0; i < vec.size(); i++) { //here I call the callbacks vec[i](i, i);//also I don't know how this should be called } } won't work, since the OBJECT that you are passing to the ...


2

When a function is a non-static member function of a class, then it is necessary to use the form &ClassName::functionName when a pointer to the member function is expected in an expression. When a function is a static member function of a class, both ClassName::functionName and &ClassName;:functionName can be used when a pointer to a function is ...


5

For global (non-member) functions, the name of the function evaluates to the address of that function except when passed to the & operator, so you can (for example) assign to a pointer to a function either with or without the & equivalently: int f() {} int (*pf1)() = f; int (*pf2)() = &f; So, in this case there's really no difference between ...


14

This is the exact definition of the function-to-pointer conversion, [conv.func]: An lvalue of function type T can be converted to a prvalue of type “pointer to T.” The result is a pointer to the function.55 55) This conversion never applies to non-static member functions because an lvalue that refers to a non-static member function cannot ...


1

It is a function pointer declaration. Your code initializes it to NULL. void (*pbindRemoveDev)( zAddrType_t *Addr ) = (void*)NULL; Unaware the compiler you're using, proper initializationn could be void (*pbindRemoveDev)( zAddrType_t *Addr ) = NULL; If you invoke the function pointer it will crash since you're pointing to NULL memory address. Below is ...


5

There is no assignment in void (*pbindRemoveDev)( zAddrType_t *Addr ) = (void*)NULL; It is initializing function pointer pbindRemoveDev to NULL. Following is the assignment void RemoveDev( zAddrType_t *Addr ); pbindRemoveDev = RemoveDev // Assignment


2

This is exactly like : int a; But here the type is : void (*)(zAddrType_t*) So yes, you can do int a = 0;


0

A question in the answer: Why does this compile and what does it mean? int func(int a) { return a; } int main(int argc, char **argv) { int(*a)(int x(float)) = func; printf("%d\n", a(1)); return 0; }


4

You can have a parameter in your function pointer. It is totally valid. The parameter list matches that of the function being called and the names is just optional. It can also be written as int (*funcPointer)(int,int); I mean int (*funcPointer)(int a, int b); This is valid and you can verify the same by calling int res = funcPointer(3,4); and ...


1

It's perfectly legal. The names a and b in funcPointer are not used for anything, but they are permitted. You could use any (legal) names you want, they don't matter at all.



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