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2081

The difference is that functionOne is defined at run-time, whereas functionTwo is defined at parse-time for a script block. For example: <script> // Error functionOne(); var functionOne = function() { }; </script> <script> // No error functionTwo(); function functionTwo() { } </script> This also means in Strict ...


1671

The difference is that apply lets you invoke the function with arguments as an array; call requires the parameters be listed explicitly. A useful mnemonic is "A for array and C for comma." See here and here. Pseudo syntax: theFunction.apply(valueForThis, arrayOfArgs) theFunction.call(valueForThis, arg1, arg2, ...) Sample code: function ...


1489

There are a lot of ways, but this is my preferred method - it lets you pass in anything you want, including false or null. (typeof null == "object") function foo(a, b) { a = typeof a !== 'undefined' ? a : 42; b = typeof b !== 'undefined' ? b : 'default_b'; ... }


1012

First I want to correct Greg: function abc(){} is scoped too — the name abc is defined in the scope where this definition is encountered. Example: function xyz(){ function abc(){}; // abc is defined here... } // ...but not here Secondly, it is possible to combine both styles: var xyz = function abc(){}; xyz is going to be defined as usual, ...


921

JavaScript syntax 101. Here is a function declaration: function foo() {} Note that there's no semicolon: this is a function declaration; you need a separate invocation of foo() to actually run the function. On the other hand, !function foo() {} is an expression, but that still doesn't invoke the function, but we can now use !function foo() {}() to do ...


667

A function is a piece of code that is called by name. It can be passed data to operate on (ie. the parameters) and can optionally return data (the return value). All data that is passed to a function is explicitly passed. A method is a piece of code that is called by name that is associated with an object. In most respects it is identical to a function ...


654

Your logic fails if optionalArg is passed, but evaluates as false - try this as an alternative if (typeof optionalArg === 'undefined') { optionalArg = 'default'; } Or an alternative idiom: optionalArg = (typeof optionalArg === 'undefined') ? 'default' : optionalArg; Use whichever idiom communicates the intent best to you!


534

A method is on an object. A function is independent of an object. For Java, there are only methods. For C, there are only functions. For C++ it would depend on whether or not you're in a class.


402

A parameter is the variable which is part of the method’s signature (method declaration). An argument is an expression used when calling the method. Consider the following code: void Foo(int i, float f) { // Do things } void Bar() { int anInt = 1; Foo(anInt, 2.0); } Here i and f are the parameters, and anInt and 2.0 are the arguments.


337

Sure, just use the arguments object. function foo() { for (var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++) { alert(arguments[i]); } }


330

A lambda is just an anonymous function - a function defined with no name. In some languages, such as Scheme, they are equivalent to named functions. In fact, function definition is re-written as binding a lambda to a variable internally. In other languages, like Python, there are some (rather needless) distinctions between them, but they behave the same way ...


315

function read_file(file, delete_after) { delete_after = delete_after || "my default here"; //rest of code } This assigns to delete_after the value of delete_after if it is not a falsey value otherwise it assigns the string "my default here". For more detail, check out Doug Crockford's survey of the language and check out the section on Operators. ...


308

Declaration A prototype for a function which takes a function parameter looks like the following: void func ( void (*f)(int) ); This states that the parameter f will be a pointer to a function which has a void return type and which takes a single int parameter. The following function (print) is an example of a function which could be passed to func as a ...


299

In the absence of any preprocessor stuff going on, foo's signature is equivalent to int foo (int *bar) The only context in which I've seen people putting seemingly unnecessary parentheses around function names is when there are both a function and a function-like macro with the same name, and the programmer wants to prevent macro expansion. This practice ...


285

To break it down. .toUpperCase() is a method of String.prototype 'a' is a primitive value, but gets converted into its Object representation We have two possible notations to access object properties/methods, dot and bracket notation So 'a'['toUpperCase']; is the access via bracket notation on the property toUpperCase, from String.prototype. Since ...


266

You just need to remove the parenthesis: addContact(entityId, refreshContactList); This then passes the function without executing it first. Here is an example: function addContact(id, refreshCallback) { refreshCallback(); // You can also pass arguments if you need to // refreshCallback(id); } function refreshContactList() { ...


239

The solution is the binding of variables through closure. I haven't used the .post function in jQuery, but a quick scan of the documentation suggests the call back should be a function pointer accepting the following: function callBack(data, textStatus, jqXHR) {}; Therefore I think the solution is as follows: var doSomething = function(extraStuff) { ...


234

In javascript you can call a function (even if it has parameters) without parameters. So you can add default values like this: function func(a, b){ if (typeof(a)==='undefined') a = 10; if (typeof(b)==='undefined') b = 20; //your code } and then you can call it like func(); to use default parameters. Here's a test: function func(a, b){ if ...


223

static functions are functions that are only visible to other functions in the same file (more precisely the same translation unit). EDIT: For those who thought, that the author of the questions meant a 'class method': As the question is tagged C he means a plain old C function. For (C++/Java/...) class methods, static means that this method can be called ...


218

Seeing as I hate eval, and I am not alone: var fn = window[settings.functionName]; if(typeof fn === 'function') { fn(t.parentNode.id); } Edit: In reply to @Mahan's comment: In this particular case, settings.functionName would be "clickedOnItem". This would, at runtime translate var fn = window[settings.functionName]; into var fn = ...


217

jQuery .live() has been removed in version 1.9 onwards. That means if you are upgrading from version 1.8 and earlier, you will notice things breaking if you do not follow the migration guide below. You must not simply replace .live() with .on()! Read before you start doing a search and replace: For quick/hot fixes on a live site, do not just replace the ...


216

my_function.__name__ Using __name__ is the preferred method as it applies uniformly. Unlike func_name, it works on built-in functions as well: >>> import time >>> time.time.func_name Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in ? AttributeError: 'builtin_function_or_method' object has no attribute 'func_name' ...


214

For thoroughness, I came across another solution which was part of the functionality introduced in version 1.4.3 of the jQuery click event handler. It allows you to pass a data map to the event object that automatically gets fed back to the event handler function by jQuery as the first parameter. The data map would be handed to the .click() function as the ...


213

Step 1: check the return code: if($content === FALSE) { // handle error here... } Step 2: suppress the warning by putting an @ in front of the file_get_contents: $content = @file_get_contents($site);


212

See Python PEP 8. Function names should be lowercase, with words separated by underscores as necessary to improve readability. mixedCase is allowed only in contexts where that's already the prevailing style Variables... Use the function naming rules: lowercase with words separated by underscores as necessary to improve ...


210

Exactly what it sounds like (assuming you're used to the abbreviated way in which C and UNIX assigns words), it duplicates strings. Keeping in mind it's actually not part of the ISO C standard itself (it's a POSIX thing), it's effectively doing the same as the following code: char *strdup (const char *s) { char *d = malloc (strlen (s) + 1); // Space ...


197

The function: function () {} returns nothing (or undefined). Sometimes we want to call a function right as we create it. You might be tempted to try this: function () {}() but it results in a SyntaxError. Using the ! operator before the function causes it to be treated as an expression, so we can call it: !function () {}() This will also return ...


193

Angular supports this out of the box. Have you tried ngSubmit on your form element? <form ng-submit="myFunc()" ng-controller="mycontroller"> <input type="text" ng-model="name" /> <br /> <input type="text" ng-model="email" /> </form> EDIT: Per the comment regarding the submit button, see Submitting a form by ...


188

I think the easiest way is to declare a simple object literal: var myInstance = { method1: function () { // ... }, method2: function () { // ... } }; If you want private members on your singleton instance, you can do something like this: var myInstance = (function() { var privateVar = ''; function privateMethod () { // ... } ...


173

you want the constant: __FUNCTION__ http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.constants.predefined.php



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