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8

The difference is calling a function vs taking a reference to a function. The syntax func() immediately calls the function provided. In element.onclick = func(), the event will be bound to the return value of func. With element.onclick = func, you are not calling func, simply referencing it and assigning it to the event. If func happened to return a ...


6

Because in your Node::myfun() your next1 and next2 variables are both destroyed (they cease to exist) at the end of the method. You're therefore returning pointers to object that no longer exist. Such pointers are known as dangling pointers, and dereferencing a dangling pointer is Undefined Behavior.


4

Using sql language, you can do it using case when: create or replace function getf(arg character varying(255)) returns int as $$ select case when arg = 'a' then 1 else 2 end $$ language sql;


4

Because that syntax (namely Function Array Dereferencing) is not supported in every PHP version. It has been implented since PHP 5.4 You can read the RFC here: https://wiki.php.net/rfc/functionarraydereferencing The funny thing is that in 2009 it was first declied and finally reapproved and added some years later. Keep in mind that given your snippet, you ...


3

A pure SQL function. It is ugly, because SQL does not have IF. (you could use CASE instead, which is ugly, too) The DISTINCT FROM is needed to catch NULLs. DROP function getf(_arg character varying(255) ); create or replace function getf(_arg character varying(255)) returns INTEGER as $$ SELECT 1::integer WHERE _arg = 'a' UNION ALL ...


2

With such a low value of n, the Taylor series is a poor approximation of sine for high numbers. For degree 8, any angle higher than around 4 will produce a significantly inaccurate result. Because sine is periodic, one easy solution would be to modulus divide the angle (in radians) by 2*pi. The StrictMath Class in Java reduces the angle in a different way ...


2

create or replace function getf(arg character varying(255)) returns int as $$ begin if arg = 'a' then return 1; else return 2; end if; end; $$ language plpgsql; Note that this is a PL/pgSQL function. The online manual has an excellent chapter on PL/pgSQL. That should provide everything you need to get started writing procedural function ...


2

The reason for IE 7 failing is the addEventListener method. IE versions older than 9 have their own, proprietary method for attaching event handlers. You’ll need to check if addEventListener is supported and if it’s not the case, check for attachEvent and use this instead. Example (taken from http://stackoverflow.com/a/6927800/1387396): function ...


2

It works because upcasting an Int16 to an Int32 is safe, so the compiler that do that, and then you have a call where you pass two Int32s in the second function as the 10 and 20 will be interpreted as Int32s unless specified.


2

Move the typedef for defining t_somefunc to "Method.h". Change the type of f from Fun to t_somefunc. Method.h: typedef void (*t_somefunc)(); class Method{ private: std::string nameMethod; t_somefunc f; public: Method(std::string const& name, t_somefunc fun) : nameMethod(name), f(fun){} Then, in main: Method* methDaniel = new ...


1

I assume you're asking for performance. Here is a jsperf to test it for you (Yup, this exists and is very neat). So in running the tests a bunch of times I note that neither method clearly wins. It's very close and almost certainly doesn't matter. I also note that on Windows 8.1, IE 11 blows Chrome out of the water, it's not even close - like by a factor ...


1

You've forgotten about PHP's variable scope rules: $result = mysqli_query($dbc, $searchZone); ^^^^---- undefined Since $dbc is undefined in the function, you're using a local null handle, which is invalid. If you'd had ANY kind of error handling in your code, you'd have been told about the problem. Try global $dbc; $result = ...


1

This might help //Assuming $dbc as connection variable function getZone($dbc,$place) { $searchZone = "SELECT ZONE FROM zones WHERE PLACE = '".$place."'"; $result = mysqli_query($dbc, $searchZone); $row = mysqli_fetch_array($result); return $row['ZONE']; } include 'path/to/connectionfile';//Only if you haven't already ...


1

Your current code attempts to use A as an object when it is a function. You would need to invoke the function A(), but then its something method would still not be available (because it is not exposed). If you want A to be an object, you could use an object literal like this: A = { something: function() { //do something } } B = function() { ...


1

The OP has clarified that the exact formatting can wait, so let's start with the "business logic", using pprint just for a more readable display of the first-stage results: import pprint agilityskills = { 'Archery': {'Archery': 4, 'Crossbow': 6, 'Bow': 6}, 'Pistols': {'Pistols': 6, 'Semi-Automatics': 8, 'Holdouts': 8}, 'Gymnastics': ...


1

This seems to prepend the current scope (when you call the returned function) to any arguments passed into _function, then finally calls it with a specified scope (_this). // Take a new scope and a callback var shiftBind = function(_this, _function) { // Wrap them, creating closure return function() { // Save the current scope, when you call ...


1

This is creating a new function that changes the this of the original function, but adds the original this as a first argument. So it's both binding and shifting the arguments down one. I have no idea what its purpose is.


1

This function you can define what parameter and what kind of parameters(string, number...) you want to pass to a function. example: var nglr = {}; nglr.shiftBind = function(_this, _function) { return function() { var args = [ this ]; for ( var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++) { args.push(arguments[i]); } return ...


1

This happens because testing is inside jQuery scope. Your code should look like this: function testing() { jQuery("#status").fadeIn(); jQuery("#preloader").delay(400).fadeIn("slow"); } (function ($) {


1

redirect() is not a built-in function, do you have it defined somewhere? If not, you can simply define one without having to change your code function redirect($url) { header("Location: $url"); die(); } Note that this function is not really needed, you can simply change your redirect() calls with the header call that this function makes but i just ...


1

As monolyth421 already mentioned, your problem is that the Taylor expansion works good for small (close to zero) values of x. If you want to obtain a good accuracy, you should consider reducing the argument to the interval [-pi/2 , pi/2] (using trigonometric identities) and then use the Taylor expansion. Only a few terms should be then enough to get good ...


1

create function getf(arg text) returns int immutable strict language sql as $$ select case when arg = 'a' then 1 else 2 end $$; This is almost like Houari's answer, but: it uses text as argument type — there's no point in limiting argument length in Postgres, in which there's no difference in representation; it is immutable, so a ...


1

Your version of PHP is obviously less than 5.4 as it supports function array dereferncing so first upgrade PHP Alternatively store output in a variable and then get the appropriate key



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