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37

inline is mostly just an external linkage specifier now, for the reasons you stated. So yes, it does have a use, but it's a different one than actually inlining functions. It allows you to define the same method multiple times between compilation units and properly link them together, instead of getting multiple definition errors. //header.h inline void ...


31

I will try to explain my "secret understanding" the best way I can. There are two entirely separate concepts here. One is the compiler's ability to replace a function call by repeating the function body directly at the call site. The other is the possibility of defining a function in more than one translation unit (= more than one .cpp file). The first one ...


19

It's named after Haskell Curry, who worked on the mathematical foundations of functional programming.


12

Haskell parsing rules are very simple. If we ignore infix operators (+, && etc.), there is only one rule: a b c d e is parsed as (((a b) c) d) e. Never, like you assumed, as a (b c d) e. (Very seldom, this may give the same result by coincidence, but normally it won't even make sense to the type checker.) So in your example, you have to read ...


11

void test (int *int_pointer); is just a declaration (or prototype) of function test. No need of this declaration in main because you already have function definition before main. If the definition of test were after main then it would be worth of putting its declaration there to let the compiler know about the return type, number of arguments and ...


10

The pythonic idiom is just to ignore the first return value by assigning it to _: _, y = function()


9

double's are implicitly convertible to ints (and truncated), and the compiler is not forced by the standard to emit a warning (it tries its best to perform the conversion whenever possible). Compile with -Wconversion g++ -Wconversion program.cpp and you'll get your warning: warning: conversion to 'int' from 'double' may alter its value ...


9

It's not idomatic C, but still valid. The line is a declaration of the function test, not definition. A function can't be defined multiple times, but it's valid to have multiple declarations.


9

It's definitely not idiomatic C, despite being fully valid (multiple declarations are okay, multiple definitions are not). It's unnecessary, so the code will still work perfectly without it. If at all, perhaps the author meant to do void test (int *int_pointer); int main (void) { ... } in case the function definition was put after main ().


9

Functions are first-class objects in Python. That means you can pass them around, and store them in lists as well, just like any other object. So why not just do this? func_list = [func1, func2, func3] random.choice(func_list)()


9

You can set your function to have its own enclosing environment: f <- local({ n <- 0 function(i, reset=FALSE) { n <<- if(reset) 0 else n + 1 print(paste("call to function number", n)) i^2 } }) f(3) # [1] "call to function number 1" # [1] 9 f(4) # [1] "call to function number 2" # [1] 16


8

The answer has already been accepted, but I had to come here and say that all answers here use a bad algorithm. There are better ones. Including very simple ones, like exponentiation by squaring that reduces the complexity from O(power) to O(log(power)). The idea is to square the base while dividing the exponent by 2. For example 3^8 = 9^4 = 81^2 = 6561 ...


8

The >> function composition works the other way round - it passes the result of the function on the left to the function on the right - so your snippet is passing bool to IsNullOrEmpty, which is a type error. The following works: (fun x -> String.IsNullOrEmpty >> not) Or you can use reversed function composition (but I think >> is ...


8

Like this. This is a typical recursive function, with two base cases and one recursive step. Remember that if n is 10, then fib(n - 1) is fib(9), and so on: fib(10) = fib(9) + fib(8) = 34 + 21 = 55 fib(9) = fib(8) + fib(7) = 21 + 13 = 34 fib(8) = fib(7) + fib(6) = 13 + 8 = 21 fib(7) = fib(6) + fib(5) = 8 + 5 = 13 fib(6) = fib(5) + fib(4) = 5 + 3 = ...


7

The quoted version allows otherwise illegal function names: > "my function" <- function() NULL > "my function"() NULL Note that most people use backticks to make it clear they are referring to a name rather than a character string. This allows you to do some really odd things as alluded to in ?assign: > a <- 1:3 > "a[1]" <- 55 > ...


7

There is no difference. It's just syntactic sugar. It is allowed in both C and C++. Function parameters are simply rewritten by the compiler as function pointer parameters, just as array parameters are rewritten by the compiler as pointer parameters. For reference, here is an excerpt from the C standard, section 3.7.1: g(int (*funcp)(void)) // ... or, ...


7

Your question is unclear. Are you simply trying to utilize math.min() in min3Z()? Because in that case, you can do: def min3Z(a: Int, b: Int, c: Int) = math.min(a, math.min(b, c)) If you want to pass in an arbitrary function (for example, making it so you can specify max or min), you can specify a function as a parameter: def min3Z(a: Int, b: Int, c: ...


7

getFileInfoClass returns a class; classes are then callable themselves -- calling a class by just a name returns an instance of it. The two pairs of parens in quick succession are just shorthand. It is effectively: file_info_class = getFileInfoClass(f) file_info_instance = file_info_class(f) Generally, the two pairs of parens like that is probably a ...


7

You could use a dictionary and then iterate through the input: zipcode = raw_input("Enter a zipcode: ") codes={1:":::||",2:"::|:|",3:"::||:",4:":|::|",5:":|:|:",6:":||::",7:"|:::|",8:"|::|:",9:"|:|::",0:"||:::"} for num in zipcode: print codes[int(num)], #add a comma here if you want it on the same line This would give you: >>> Enter a ...


7

You should use a dict with keyword argument expansion (**): for i in range(0, 3): target = "v" + str(i) kwarg = {target: 'z'} foo(**kwarg) Or more simply: for i in range(0, 3): foo(**{"v%s" % i: 'z'})


7

I'm not really sure what the problem is. Or if there is any problem. If you want to know how to call your created function, you'll need to do something like this: SELECT MyFunction(@T,@R,@S) Obviously replacing the @T, @R, @S with the values you like to pass through the function. If you want to use the function on columns within a table, you can ...


7

You have not defined what red should do. You'd need something like: $.fn.red = function(/*options object maybe?*/) { return this.css( "background-color", "red" ); }; jsFiddle Example And there is no need for an inline event like that, using jQuery: $(function() { $("button").on("click", function() { $(this).red(); }); }); You ...


6

You can't bind a temporary to a non-const reference. Post-increment (a++) increments a and returns a temporary with a's old value. Why are you passing by non-const reference? - it doesn't look like you're changing the parameter inside the function, just just pass by value or const reference. If you were changing the parameter, what would you expect the ...


6

You might be looking for this: accelerate :: Float -> [Particle] -> [Particle] accelerate x ps = map (\p -> accelerateParticle x p ps) ps Note that the list of all particles ps is used both to map over it, and as a parameter of accelerateParticle.


6

f is a dependent name, since it depends on t whose type is a template parameter. The name lookup rules for dependent names are given in [temp.dep.res]/1: In resolving dependent names, names from the following sources are considered: Declarations that are visible at the point of definition of the template. Declarations from namespaces associated ...


6

Is this correct? Theoretically, yes — in fact, according to the spec, there are something like three objects created: A declarative environment record, a lexical environment object, and the arguments pseudo-array. Most people lump the first two together under the name "execution context." This is detailed in ยง10.4.3 of the spec and the ...


6

You added the alert() in such a way that it only runs when the if test fails, because you didn't add { } to match the intention indicated by your indentation. If the if test succeeds, then the following return statement will exit the function and the alert() won't happen. Any code that involves an if or else if block that always returns but is nevertheless ...


6

dprintf() is not defined by the Standard. If you configure your compiler for Standard C, the function should no longer be exposed gcc -std=c99 -pedantic ...


6

It sounds like you need to do this: def main(): wiki_scrape() all_csv() wiki_set = scraped_set('locations.csv') country_set = all_set('all.csv') print wiki_set main() # this calls your main function Even better: def main(): wiki_scrape() all_csv() wiki_set = scraped_set('locations.csv') country_set = ...


6

Point 1 [Programmatic error] The problem here is the usage with %c format specifier. It counts the previously entered \n, stored by pressing the ENTER key after previous input. What you want is scanf(" %c", &tag[i].owner); ^ | note the space to skip any leading whitespace like character (including \n) before the actual input. Point ...



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