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160

Function declarations are hoisted (moved to the top) in JavaScript. While incorrect in terms of parsing order, the code you have is semantically the same as the following since function declarations are hoisted: function f() { console.log("Me duplicate."); } var f = function() { console.log("Me original."); } f(); Which in turn, with the ...


104

1.The function is called recursively until a condition is met. That condition is a > b. When this condition is met, return 0. At first glance, I would expect the return value to be 0 which is obviously incorrect. Here is what the computer computing sumInts(2,5) would think if it were able to: I want to compute sumInts(2, 5) for this, I need to ...


80

I think the confusion is stemming from thinking of it as "the same function" being called many times. If you think of it as "many copies of the same function being called", then it may be clearer: Only one copy of the function ever returns 0, and it's not the first one (it's the last one). So the result of calling the first one is not 0. For the second bit ...


56

If all these parameters are meaningfully related, pack them in a structure.


48

This seems like an implementation bug. Apparently, the way exported functions work in bash is that they use specially-formatted environment variables. If you export a function: f() { ... } it defines an environment variable like: f='() { ... }' What's probably happening is that when the new shell sees an environment variable whose value begins with ...


39

If you only have one input you can use the form tag. <form ng-submit="myFunc()" ...> If you have more than one input, or don't want to use the form tag, or want to attach the enter-key functionality to a specific field, you can inline it to a specific input as follows: <input ng-keyup="$event.keyCode == 13 ? myFunc() : null" ...>


33

To understand recursion you must think of the problem in a different way. Instead of a large logical sequence of steps that makes sense as a whole you instead take a large problem and break up into smaller problems and solve those, once you have an answer for the sub problems you combine the results of the sub problems to make the solution to the bigger ...


33

In short, use std::function unless you have a reason to not. Function pointers have the disadvantage of not being able to capture some context. You won't be able to for example pass a lambda function as a callback which captures some context variables (but it will work if it doesn't capture any). Calling a member variable of an object (i.e. non-static) is ...


31

Why avoid goto? The problem you want to solve is: How to make sure some common code always gets executed before the function returns to the caller? This is an issue for C programmers, since C does not provide any built in support for RAII. As you already concede in your question body, goto is a perfectly acceptable solution. Never-the-less, there may be ...


31

Here's the rundown on the standard forms that create functions: (Originally written for another question, but adapted after being moved into the canonical question.) Function Declaration The first form is a function declaration, which looks like this: function x() { console.log('x'); } A function declaration is a declaration; it's not a statement or ...


28

Recursion is a tricky topic to understand and I don't think I can fully do it justice here. Instead, I'll try to focus on the particular piece of code you have here and try to describe both the intuition for why the solution works and the mechanics of how the code computes its result. The code you've given here solves the following problem: you want to know ...


24

Put them in a struct Create a structure struct GenerateScriptParams { /* ... */ }; and put all the parameters in there. You can actually provide default values for the initialization of the struct as well by implementing a default constructor or, in C++11, by providing default initialization of individual members. You can then change the values that are ...


23

This is known as chaining and helps you create a fluent interface. Each function returns a reference to the current jQuery instance, which is why you can chain the calls together. You first create a jQuery instance using $('.element'), which returns an insance of the jQuery object; it's essentially like a constructor. Then each member function of the jQuery ...


23

Well compiler hints why this does happen. The crucial thing it here: ex14.c:32:5: error: conflicting types for ‘can_print_it’ ex14.c:33:1: note: an argument type that has a default promotion can’t match an empty parameter name list declaration The argument for can_print_it has a default promotion, therefore it cannot have an implicit declaration. Great ...


23

Because if your object (for whatever reason) was created on the stack of the called function, returning and using a reference to it is undefined behavior. With return-by-value the compiler can sometimes optimize the return and there are no dangerous dangling references. With C++11 and move semantics this is brought to a new level. It doesn't quite make ...


22

The other answers have done a good job at explaining duck typing and the simple answer by tzot: Python does not have variables, like other languages where variables have a type and a value; it has names pointing to objects, which know their type. However, one interesting thing has changed since 2010 with the implementaion of PEP 3107 when the question ...


21

Closures are expensive for performance and memoryusage in php. Procedural coding provoked a big ball of mud, spaghetti code and other anti patterns. Switch structures are very hard to test and it's a violation of OCP. You should prefer OOP in SOLID way to avoid redundancy, improving scalability and maintainablity. That is the best practice to provide a set ...


20

tl;dr: Don't use something that looks like a function declaration inside a block, especially not a conditional. Fact is, most browsers interpret this piece of code the wrong way. They treat the function definitions as function declarations, even though function declarations are not allowed inside blocks, since a function declaration is not a statement, ...


18

You are comparing methods, and method objects are created anew each time you access one on an instance or class (via the descriptor protocol). Once you tested their id() you discard the method again (there are no references to it), so Python is free to reuse the id when you create another method. You want to test the actual functions here, by using ...


18

A better explanation to Greg's answer functionTwo(); function functionTwo() { } Why No error? We were always taught that expressions are excuted from top to bottom?? Because: Function declarations and variable declarations are always moved (hoisted) invisibly to the top of their containing scope by the JavaScript interpreter. Function parameters and ...


17

If your anonymous methods/functions are paramless, you must assign with (); v1 := GetHandler(); Without the brackets Delphi will try to assign the function to the variable. The brackets tell it to assign the function result to the variable.


16

You can see for yourself using objdump -r -d: 0000000000000000 <demo>: 0: 55 push %rbp 1: 48 89 e5 mov %rsp,%rbp 4: bf 00 00 00 00 mov $0x0,%edi 5: R_X86_64_32 .rodata 9: b8 00 00 00 00 mov $0x0,%eax e: e8 00 00 00 00 callq 13 ...


16

A struct in C++ is actually a class definition where its content are public, unless specified otherwise by including a protected: or private: section. When the compiler sees a class or struct, it first digests all the declarations within the block ({}) before operating on them. In the regular method case, the compiler hasn't yet seen the type declared.


16

You want to wrap your onclick callback in a debouncing function like http://underscorejs.org/#debounce Say you have this function search() { // ... } $jquery(".myFilterCheckboxes").click(search); You should be able to just change the above to: // Only allow one click event / search every 500ms: ...


16

Ok, so let's first make the function definition a bit more clear by using indentation let f x y = if y/=0 then f (x+1) (y-1) else x in f 3 5 So f is called with arguments 3 and 5 at first. y being 5 (i.e. not 0), the then branch is executed, which calls f with arguments 4 and 4. Since y is still not equal to 0, we go into the then ...


15

The following: x='() { echo I do nothing; }; echo vulnerable' bash -c 'typeset -f' prints vulnerable x () { echo I do nothing } declare -fx x seems, than Bash, after having parsed the x=..., discovered it as a function, exported it, saw the declare -fx x and allowed the execution of the command after the declaration. echo vulnerable x='() { x; ...


15

Yes, you must at least declare the function before you call it, even if the actual definition does not come until afterwards. That is why you often declare the functions in header files, then #include them at the top of your cpp file. Then you can use the functions in any order, since they have already been effectively declared. Note in your case you could ...


15

You've got some good answers here so far, but I'll add one more that takes a different tack. First off, I have written many articles on simple recursive algorithms that you might find interesting; see http://ericlippert.com/tag/recursion/ http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/tags/recursion/ Those are in newest-on-top order, so start from the ...


15

I don't think Swift support static variable without it attach to a class/struct. Try declare a private struct with static variable. func foo() -> Int { struct Holder { static var timesCalled = 0 } return ++Holder.timesCalled; } 7> foo() $R0: Int = 1 8> foo() $R1: Int = 2 9> foo() $R2: Int = 3


15

I wanted something a little more extensible/semantic than the given answers so I wrote a directive that takes a javascript object in a similar way to the built-in ngClass: HTML <input key-bind="{ enter: 'go()', esc: 'clear()' }" type="text"></input> The values of the object are evaluated in the context of the directive's scope - ensure they ...



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