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23

msgmerge marks strings as fuzzy if the old catalog had a translation for a strings with a similar-looking msgid. It also carries over strings marked as fuzzy from an old catalog to a new one. msgfmt excludes fuzzy messages from the compiled catalog, as the translations are likely incorrect. The translator should check correctness of the translation (in the ...


21

The parsing is quite easy. It can be implemented as bunch of regexps and some date calculations. The sample below can be easily extended to suit your needs. I've roughly tested it and it works at least for the following strings: next month, next year, next 4 months, next 3 days 3 days ago, 5 hours ago tomorrow, yesterday last year, last month, last tue, ...


13

This bug was resolved back in February; update your version. To answer your question, yes, there are several ways to modify immutable types at the C level. The security implications are unknown, and possibly even unknowable, at this point.


12

There is a property in NSDateFormatter - "doesRelativeDateFormatting". It appears only in 10.6/iOS4.0 and later but it will format a date into a relative date in the correct locale. From Apple's Documentation: If a date formatter uses relative date formatting, where possible it replaces the date component of its output with a phrase—such as ...


10

Since you are new to machine-learning/data-mining, you shouldn't tackle such advanced problems. After all, the data you are working with was used in a competition (KDD Cup'99), so don't expect it to be easy! Besides the data was intended for a classification task (supervised learning), where the goal is predict the correct class (bad/good connection). You ...


8

As noted by other commenters, Unicode normalisation ("compatibilty characters") isn't going to help you here as you aren't looking for official equivalences but for similarities in glyphs (letter shapes). (The linked Unicode Technical Report is still worth reading, though, as it is extremely well written.) If I were you, to spare you the tedious work of ...


8

As you already showed in the grid on the left, you can start by calculating the edit distances for every pair of words. This is easily done in polynomial time (n^2 edit distance calculations). Then your problem can be described as a "minimum weighted bipartite matching", or equivalently, a "maximum weighted bipartite matching". This can also be done in ...


8

This question should get you started. It has the code this very site uses to calculate its relative time. It may not have the specific ranges you want, but they are easy enough to add once you got it setup.


7

You might want to look at Rail's distance_of_time_in_words function in date_helper.rb, which I've pasted below. # File vendor/rails/actionpack/lib/action_view/helpers/date_helper.rb, line 59 def distance_of_time_in_words(from_time, to_time = 0, include_seconds = false, options = {}) from_time = from_time.to_time if from_time.respond_to?(:to_time) to_time ...


7

public static int DamerauLevenshteinDistance( string string1 , string string2 , int threshold) { // Return trivial case - where they are equal if (string1.Equals(string2)) return 0; // Return trivial case - where one is empty // WRONG FOR YOUR ...


6

So, here is the category I wrote on NSDate for those who are still interested. The problem is one of those that becomes a little quixotic. It is basically a huge switch statment (although I implemented it in a series of cascading if()s to keep it more readable. For each time period I then select from a random set of ways of telling the time. All in all, ...


6

This is based on code in the Pretty and Humane date & time threads. I added handling for "last Monday, 5pm", because I like that more than x days ago. This handles past and future up to centuries. I am keen on the internationalization aspect so this needs a lot more work eventually. Calculations are in the local time zone. public static class ...


6

Have you considered the fuzzystrmatch module? You can use soundex, difference, levenshtein, metaphone and dmetaphone, or a combination. fuzzystrmatch documentation SELECT something FROM somewhere WHERE levenshtein(item1, item2) < Carefully_Selected_Threshold For example the levenshtein distance from MICROSOFT to MICROSFT is one (1). ...


6

You'll likely have to code this from scratch. There may be a Java library that you could convert, but it seems this type of functionality is a thing of academia right now, rather than something being in production various places. In the end you may be able to use something academic, but you'll probably have to code your own based on your need. To allow ...


5

Is Levenshtein distance supposed to be used as an absolute value? It seems like it would depend on your requirements. (To clarify: Levenshtein distance is an absolute value, but as the OP pointed out, the raw value may not be as useful as for a given application as a measure that takes the length of the word into account. This is because we are ...


5

Have a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Locality-sensitive_hashing. One very simple approach would be to divide up each address (or whatever) into a set of overlapping n-grams. This STACKOVERFLOW becomes the set {STACKO, TACKO, ACKOV, CKOVE... , RFLOW}. Then use a large hash-table or sort-merge to find colliding n-grams and check collisions with a fuzzy ...


4

Since there is a native nice support for sets in python, we can modify JGs code as, def jaccard(a, b): """ Jaccard coefficient (/\ represents intersection), given by : Jaccard(A, B) = (A /\ B) / (|a|) + (|b|) - (A /\ B) """ c = a.intersection(b) return float(len(c)) / (len(a) + len(b) - len(c)) jaccard(set("Selling a beautiful ...


4

You can try to use some string similarity measures, such as Jaccard and Dice, but instead of calculating character overlaps, you calculate word overlaps. For example, using Python, you can use the following: def word_overlap(a, b): return [x for x in a if x in b] def jaccard(a, b, overlap_fn=word_overlap): """ Jaccard coefficient (/\ ...


4

I also had these problems and I solved them all by using a 'po editor' (like poedit) which highlights fuzzy and untranslated entries and makes the translation process much faster. You can also use Django Rosetta to have the translating process integrated in your Django environment.


4

You'll have to transform your data into a numeric form. There are various ways of doing that, two of them being: use vectors of feature counts (common in, e.g., text categorization) use a one-hot representation, where a categorical feature that can take on n distinct values is represented as string of n bits, with only the i'th bit set if a feature has the ...


4

Unless you heavily restrict the code that people are allowed to write, it is basically impossible to do a good job of parsing C++ (and hence syntax highlighting beyond keywords/regular expressions) without parsing all the headers. The pre-processor is particularly good at screwing things up for you. There are some thoughts on the difficulties of fuzzy ...


4

A data.table solution avoiding stringr. I am sure this could be improved Dealing with text data # make the factor columns character .data <- lapply(data, function(x) if(is.factor(x)) {as.character(x)} else { x}) library(data.table) DT <- as.data.table(.data) DT[, original_text := text] # using `%like% which is an easy data.table wrapper for grepl ...


4

Here's my shot at it. It's probably not very efficient, but I think it will get the job done. I assume that df$candidates is of class factor. #fuzzy matches candidate names to other candidate names #compares each pair of names only once ##by looking at names that have a greater index matches <- unlist(lapply(1:(length(levels(df[["candidate"]]))-1), ...


4

Input image should be CONVERTED from RGB to GRAY to run the code. " Array dimensions must match for binary array op " - 'error will not occur'


4

A dummy solution is given by the function diary which enables the storing of the matlab console output on a file. X = [randn(20,2)+ones(20,2); randn(20,2)-ones(20,2)]; opts = statset('Display','iter'); diary('output.txt') % # Whatever is displayed from now on is saved on 'output.txt' [cidx, ctrs] = kmeans(X, 2, 'Distance','city', ... 'Replicates',5, ...


3

For any grouping you should have transitive equality, that is a ~= b, b ~= c => a ~= c. Formulate it strictly using words and we'll try to formulate it using SQL. For instance, which group should foo*bar go to? Update: This query replaces all non-alphanumerical characters with spaces and returns first title from each group: SELECT DISTINCT ON ...


3

One of the systems our users use allows them to enter dates like so: T // Today T + 1 // Today plus/minus a number of days T + 1w // Today plus/minus a number of weeks T + 1m // Today plus/minus a number of months T + 1y // Today plus/minus a number of years They seem to like it, and requested it in our app, so I came up with the following code. ...


3

I am not sure why you say it would be a horrid coding practice. Each of the return strings are actually a subset of the parent set, so you can quite elegantly do this in a if/elseif chain. if timestamp < 5sec "A moment ago" elseif timestamp < 5min "Few minutes ago" elseif timestamp < 12hr && timestamp < noon "Today Morning" ...


3

I don't know of any library/product although I can imagine that this point has been at least thought about in any of the "semantic" fields (like semantic web etc.). IF I undestand corectly what you are after (esp. when you want to sort etc.) then those "fuzzy" things are just "intervals" between two specific points in time... You could create a class ...



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