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9

I'm a day late and a dollar short on this one. If you want to view the folder structure of the GAC in Windows Explorer, you can do this by using the registry: Launch regedit. Navigate to HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Fusion Add a DWORD called DisableCacheViewer and set the value to 1. For a temporary view, you can substitute a drive for the folder path, ...


9

I was having the same problem. Turned out I was missing the ./Views/Web.config file, because I created the project from an empty ASP.NET application instead of using an ASP.NET MVC template. For ASP.NET MVC 5, a vanilla ./Views/Web.config file contains the following: <?xml version="1.0"?> <configuration> <configSections> ...


5

Unfortunately, you won't be able to bypass the GAC - Assembly.LoadFrom(), Assembly.LoadFile(), and even loading it into a byte array and using Assembly.Load(byte[]) will all check the GAC first for an assembly with the same identity, and load it instead. You used to be able to do what you want in .net 1.1, but since 2.0, the GAC is checked first. See How ...


3

As a disclaimer, I'm going to start by saying that you should never directly edit the contents of your GAC. On to the information... There are two different GAC's in play in your question, the 2.0 GAC and the 4.0 GAC. When talking about these, they aren't so much referring to the version of the .NET framework, so much as the version of the CLR being used. ...


3

even a more convenient one is to save the content of the GAC to the file like this: gacutil -l >yourassemblies.txt


3

There's no way to conditionally specify Flags parameter values e.g. by having a script function. My guess is that it's simply because many of those flags needs to be known already at compilation time. So your script is the best you can write for conditional Flags specification.


3

You are probably looking for the custom look of the GAC directory that you were familiar with in .NET versions prior to 4.0. Which stored the GAC in the c:\windows\assembly window and used a custom shell extension to flatten the directory structure into a list of assemblies. The shell extension is no longer used for .NET versions 4.0 and up. You have .NET ...


3

No. There is nothing special about GAC from Windows security point of view - it is just folder with files in the location that requires admin rights to change files.


2

Set CopyLocal=true for Microsoft.Web.Infrastructure.dll. This will force VS to copy the binary to the bin directory during compile / deployment. Instructions for doing this can be found at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/t1zz5y8c(v=vs.100).aspx. Edit: If this doesn't work, your version of VS may require you to drop the .dll into the bin directory ...


2

The GAC uses an assemblies strong-name to identify it, this is a combination of simple text name, version number, and culture information (if provided) — plus a public key and a digital signature Given you are renaming the DLL then the GAC should identify your updated DLL as a completely different assembly so there should be no issues with overwriting ...


2

Just add a reference to the DLL and set Copy Local to False. This way the application will be published without the DLL and expect it to be present on the clients' system, which it will be: in the GAC. Read How the Runtime Locates Assemblies for more information.


2

I had the same problem and crimbo gave me the right clue, it was caused by the ./Views/Web.config file which was present but not containing the right namespaces I guess... I created a blank MVC5 project and imported its ./Views/Web.config into my existing project and the red waves under every ViewBag use are gone !


2

It's inconvenient, but not rocket science to sign/resign third party assemblies. Assuming you want to sign an unsigned dll like System.ComponentModel.Composition.dll with the default.snk key: open the VS command prompt and cd to your folder with the unsigned dll(s) run ildasm /all /out=System.ComponentModel.Composition.il ...


2

Another simple option would be to manually edit the project file as XML in visual studio (You will have to unload the project first), and simply add node <Reference Include="<name of dll>" /> in MSBuild project file. After reloading the project, VS will pick up the reference without problem.


2

You can install assemblies to the GAC with a PowerShell script from http://powershellgac.codeplex.com/, so your install.ps1 script can definitely do this. However a word of caution is warranted; doing this is probably not going to give most people the behavior they want. Each project is going to use a strong name reference to a specific version. Just ...


2

There seems to be a bug with how ServiceStack is picking up WebHostPhysicalPath. You may be able to resolve this yourself by manually specifying the root directory of your application in the Configure method of your AppHost: public override void Configure(Funq.Container container) { Config = new HostConfig { WebHostPhysicalPath = ...


2

Here's some official information by Microsoft: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dkkx7f79(v=vs.110).aspx It seems that you have 2 solutions: Using an installer or using GacUtil. Since GacUtil is not installed (it comes with an SDK), you should go for the installer option.


2

Whether or not you can "sneak" a new Assembly in depends on several factors. However, in no cases is this a supported production operation. If only the internals of an Artifact have changed, Schemas and Maps being the least complicating, you can usually get away with it, in DEV only. But if any interface (Ports) or definitions (Schema/Message Type) ...


2

Yes, I do this: Mark those references as Copy Local = true. This puts the dlls in the bin folder after a build. That might be enough for you, but I do these following steps if I want to add those to source control so that other devs/build servers can find the assemblies: Then move them from the bin to some other folder in your solution. Remove the ...


2

I assume 1.0.0.0 is installed by an earlier wix installer of you. Then it is a matter of letting the new installer remove older installations before installing the new. You can read about upgrades in WiX here and here.


2

Assemblies are identified by their simple name, version number, public key token, supported culture and processor architecture. Although the processor architecture is only optional when referencing assemblies. MyAssembly, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=en-US, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089c, ProcessorArchitecture=msil The GAC can only hold unique assemblies ...


1

You cannot do this. You can expose methods of this dll as wcf service interface or use .net remoting to call this dll remotely.


1

Workaround using decompilation & signing (using Developer Command prompt for Visual studio): ildasm.exe /all /typelist /out=DataSystem.il DataSystem.dll ilasm.exe /dll /optimize /key=DataSystem.snk DataSystem.il DataSystem.snk can be generated as a file using Visual Studio IDE ...


1

In general, you should check your ULS log to see which version of your solution is running. If you see the old one, then you can be sure that your activated site feature is still bound to the old version. In this case you have to Inactivate the site feature indeed to loose that tie and then Activate to bind to the new one (it appears Activate always ties the ...


1

To add an assembly to the GAC, you don't need to have all the references of that assembly into the GAC as well. So as long as the application that is using your assembly can find all the references it is no problem. So either deploy all the assemblies privately (in the same folder as the application) or deploy them into that GAC and deploy only that ...


1

The screenshot does not show the GAC, it should look different (I am not allowed yet to upload pictures as example). Open folder %SystemRoot%\assembly (mostly C:\Windows\assembly) and check content there. Perhaps Oracle.DataAccess was not installed properly. Kind Regards


1

Oracle.DataAccess 4.112.2.0 comes with the 11.2.0.2 Oracle Client. You can download the full Oracle Client with the installer from http://support.oracle.com (patch number 10098816, zip 4of7). You need a valid support subscription on your customer support identifier to do this, but this shouldnt be a problem, since you have already managed to get the ...


1

As Hans Passant at one time had answered, the old GAC is displayed by a shell extension which masks the directory structure. This is to make sure the assemblies in the GAC are managed properly. Opening the directory structure is intentionally not supported. In .NET 4, that is no longer the case so if you can upgrade, that's the way to go. To ...


1

Here is a small util function I wrote for gaccing assemblies. It does a few check before doing so: function Gac-Util { param ( [parameter(Mandatory = $true)][string] $assembly ) try { $Error.Clear() [Reflection.Assembly]::LoadWithPartialName("System.EnterpriseServices") | Out-Null ...


1

If you keep updating that project, In that case you can add build event to GAC automatically on that particular project using following post built event.Under Build Event in project properties just you can add the following post build event to GAC your modified dll.Just copy and past following line with zero modification "%ProgramFiles(x86)%\Microsoft ...



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