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2

Yes. However, network latency is not negligible and your app's response time will almost double if entities exist. From: https://cloud.google.com/appengine/docs/python/datastore/entities#Python_Batch_operations A batch operation for two keys costs two reads, even if one of the keys did not exist. For example, it is more economical to do a keys-only query ...


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How should I think about converting the SQL schema into a NDB schemaless structure? If you are planning to transfer your SQL data to the Datastore, you need to think about how these two systems are very different. Should I simply set up Kinds to mirror each table? In thinking about making this transfer, simple analogies like this will only get you so ...


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In regards to what @Patrick Costello is posting in the comments, I'd add that yeah, eventual consistency is the cause of this, but you can also attempt to alleviate these side effects of eventual consistency by adding entities to entity groups using ancestors. From this link: To obtain strongly consistent query results, you need to use an ancestor ...


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Before you start coding on a new platform, first do a bit of research and try to fully understand all the features and nuances first. To answer your question, YES, you can create an Entity Group with the original post as parent and then each comment as a child, but WHY? What are you trying to achieve? Having a Post with comments attached to it, right? Why ...


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Like you said, everytime the Java code is ran, you reinitialize the variable to 0. You can solve this by having the id variable fetched from the datastore instead of just being a Java variable. This way it will stay the updated version even after you restart the instance or boot up another one.


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Here's my best attempt at trying to reproduce your error -- it includes all the sparse fragments of code you've deigned to share with us, and miserably fails to show any error at all. import logging import webapp2 from google.appengine.ext import ndb class Bin(ndb.Model): id=ndb.IntegerProperty(required=True) label=ndb.StringProperty(required=True) ...


0

Look into Cloud Endpoints. The link you provide no longer works and the "Mobile Backend Starter" is no longer online. In a Cloud Endpoints API (this example is for python), you can make use of DateTimeField on a Message object returned from your Endpoints API method. There will be no need to worry about data type conversion, as this is handled by the ...


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If I understand your question correctly, you are envisioning a system where you have: A Kind in your Datastore where the Entities for that Kind can have differing subsets of a common property-key space W. Entity 1's property set might be {W[0], W[1]}, and Entity 2's property set might be {W[1], W[2], W[5]}. You want to know whether this polymorphism (or ...


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Of course this is possible. Think of the key of an entity being like the primary key of an SQL row (but please, don't stretch the analogy too far - the point is it's a primary key - the implementations of these two data storage systems are very different and it causes people trouble when they don't keep this in mind). You should look either here (JDO) to ...


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Number one: you should control all code that is making task queue requests. In order to even make a request on that task queue route successfully, the call needs to generate from inside your code. Thus, you should be able to rate-limit events, check queues, etc. so that you don't see more requests than you need. If it's a resource contention between multiple ...


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You may have not added your Endpoint class into web.xml file. Based on Java servlet API your are using or Endpoint you need to define the class manually into web.xml like this: <servlet> <servlet-name>SystemServiceServlet</servlet-name> ...


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The way to do something like this would be to use an "offset". Unfortunately, the way offset it implemented, it doesn't "skip" looking at 1-50. It'll read them (costing you a read in your daily quotas/budgets), and return the following results. It will do what you want, but it will still charge you, unfortunately, You'd have to write something like ...


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Problem which I faced was my parent object primary key was "Key" object. Changing to to Long worked. Not sure what is the exact issue and how it solved the problem as I'm new to android and gae


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A query will match only what is queried for. If the entity fulfills the condition, it will return the entity. If you have a repeated property and a query matches one of the values, it will return the whole list in the entity, not only the one that matches. This is why repeated properties should almost always be either a key, a simple value, or a simple key ...


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If you are looking to do additional processing or actions when you receive a request on a route handler or on an Endpoints API function, I'd recommend strongly that you look into Task Queues to solve that problem. This enables you to perform the background processing/hooks that you define, while also keeping the latency on your requests low, making sure the ...


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You set a cursor on a query when you have it. Otherwise, you simply don't set it - this will query from the very beginning. For example: Query q = new Query("Person"); QueryResultList<Entity> results; Cursor cursor = null; FetchOptions queryOptions = FetchOptions.Builder.withChunkSize(500); do { if (cursor != null) { ...


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A datastore's unique key is the fully qualified key, including all parent entity keys, not just the ID. Multiple entities with the same ID and different parents are completely valid, and you shouldn't rely on the id alone being unique.


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Can you please change User primary key from "Key" to "Long" and test again. @Id @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY) private Long key; and keep primary key of Feed as it is.


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Can you convert your primary key to @Id @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY) private Long id; if you are using @Id @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY) private Key key; and check again.


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The answer, in general, is that no, as long as you are using keys to establish relationships between entities, you will be safe from unnecessary inline duplication. Always use keys for entity relationships. For JDO, the specifics can be found here.


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Projection queries don't have to be only on a single entity. You can do exactly this with a projection query. In your case, something like this: q := datastore.NewQuery("EntityKindYouDefinedName").Project("status_property") See the doc for more information on how to process the results of this projection query.


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That method is just a convenience method, shorthand for keys() with a bunch of keys constructed from that type and set of ids. Take a look at the implementation in LoadTypeImpl. By subclassing a few of the Objectify command classes, you could add your own overload. Or just use the keys() method.


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The only way I found is to contact google support. They are the only ones who can do it...


1

Maybe you are looking for multitenancy using different namespaces for different types of users. Here is the documentation: https://cloud.google.com/appengine/docs/java/multitenancy/multitenancy


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Just want to add one possible scenario since a quick search of "taskqueue 405" all ends up in this page: I got 405 errors because didn't specify a "target" parameter. taskqueue.add() ends up adding task to the default target, where my handlers are on a separate backend module. If target is unspecified, then tasks are invoked on the same version of ...


5

The issue here is that the Google Datastore is not really a relational database. it's a key-value store, so it's not so much truly connecting the 3 entities so much as just including references to each other. That means that there's no real way for a cascading delete. As such, your best bet would be to query the children, fetch their entities, and then ...


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To enforce strong consistency two conditions have to apply: The db.Model Entity has to have a ancestor relationship AND your query has to filter by ancestor Then all children will be queried using strong consistency. A good explanation can be foud here


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Without knowing anything about GAE and its workings I got some thoughts on this that may or may not help you forward: If you try to print the string (ex: print the_string) and its written as the thing in your question you could use eval (ex: print eval(the_string)). Or if you just want to make it into a unicode object, use: the_string=eval(the_string). By ...


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I see you answered your own question, but what is one to do when they need absolutely consistent data? This could be consistent either through atomic reads and writes, or through a forced cache/flush expiration. It's not clear to me how one would make sure that the data retrieved from the server is consistent. I probably need to read more, but how is this ...


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This is not exactly a threading issue as you may have multiple instances of your app performing the tasks, and those instances do not know about each other. So this is a contention situation. You have several options on how to resolve it. Use sharding for your counters. Instead of constantly updating the same entity, create a new entity for each completed ...


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Well, SQL accumulators are more efficient, but the app engine datastore will scale more efficiently for very large datasets. To answer your specific question: If each entity has a Date property activity_date and int prop hours, create a search index for (activity_date, hours), then use an ancestor projection query: SELECT entity.date, entity.hours where ...


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I believe it was the 1000 item limit per entity for indexes on list properties. I partitioned the property into groups of 999, e.g. property1, property2 etc. as needed. I was then able to create indexes for each chunked property successfully.


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In your use case, nothing bad would happen - all of your writes will succeed. Some of them may be retried internally by the App Engine, but you should not worry about that. You should only get concerned when you expect this rate to be exceeded for a substantial period of time. Then retries would come on top of previous retries and commits may start failing. ...


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This is intended behaviour. Any administrator of the app - no matter in what role - can access the app using the remote api. Remote API does not use the default service account, it is merely a bridge to the datastore API that is tunneled over HTTP. If you want to lock down to read for a given user, build your own REST Api that provides readonly access.


1

No, you can't use download_data to backup full text search stored indexes. They are like datastores functionally and they are stored similar. If you want to "backup" the data, you can programmatically fetch them and copy them into another search index and then save it. Or simply pull it out and save it to Cloud Storage or something similar. In summary, ...


2

A get always looks up an exact key and returns the entity with that key. You can't do a get with an incomplete key. You would need to do a query on the entity type.


2

Yeah, it will be read correctly. But note that entity will not become compressed if you will not update this property. So, after adding compressed=True, to compress all existing entities you should run a job to: entity.compressed_value = entity.compressed_value entity.put() It will not work if you will just "re put" all of them. Use ...


0

So, to begin, I'll gently remind you that there are no "tables" in Datastore. Thinking using the terms of the RDBMS world will only confuse you. Please take the time to really understand the underlying storage mechanisms and data structures. I'd recommend this video for an in-depth look at what Datastore actually is. So to get to your actual use-case, ...


1

I see what you mean. You create the Entity but you didn't do perform a put() on it. In these case, the Entity is not actually saved in the datastore until you do a datastore.put(Entity). All the editing and changes you make to an Entity needs a put() to complete the transaction, without the put(), it's not saved in the datastore, which you can verify in ...


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Just encode this struct into json (bytes) and store the json in the datastore EDIT / UPDATE package main import ( "encoding/json" "fmt" ) type Bus struct { Number string `json:"number"` Name string `json:"name"` DirectStations []Station `json:"directstation"` // Station is another struct ReverseStations ...


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The communication between a browser and the App Engine is the same as between a browser and any web server - there are no differences in communication protocols, DNS use, etc. Your client application does not even know that the server side resides on the App Engine.


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I'm new to Google App Engine and I didn't read the documentation before diving in. Now that I actually read the docs, it looks like I'll be answering my own question. This can be accomplished via a simple query, looping over the Keys, and appending the StringID of each key to a slice of strings: var queuedUsers []string q := ...


0

You get the exploding indexes problem when you have an index on multiple list/repeated properties. In this case a single entity would generate all combinations of the property values (i.e. an index on (A, B) where A has N entries and B has M entries will generate N*M index entries). In this case you shouldn't get the exploding index problem since you aren't ...


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You are getting urlsafe string here. this_key = ndb.Key(urlsafe=resource) query_result_as_entity = this_key.get() After converting urlsafe string to key, you can just do get() on it.


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No, you have to re-save all old entities. The Datastore only updates indexes when an entity is saved.


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You declare some variable called "tokens" yet pass in a parameter (presumably what you intended to be the tokens variable). A variable is not a parameter, they are different. Either use an explicit parameter, or an implicit parameter (with : prefix) as any decent JDO docs would tell you


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Thanks to zanky I managed to understand it and I want to add my code because some code is deprecated in his answer and also some code need more explanation like overriding and asynctask. By the way the code may not work on local server because of the localhost and IP confusion. Try on the app engine when you are ready. Servlet-1 BlobUrlGet. This will go to ...


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If you really want break/continue support in jinja2 -- take a look on Loop Controls extension. Just add it into "extensions" jinja's environment arguments: 'environment_args': { 'autoescape': True, 'extensions': [ 'jinja2.ext.loopcontrols', ], 'auto_reload': False, }


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May be you can try this, All you need to do is enable datastore admin and select the table and delete all data. https://cloud.google.com/appengine/docs/adminconsole/datastoreadmin#enabling_datastore_admin_for_an_application


0

There might be a disconnect elsewhere, I ran this code: People(FirstName="Patrick", LastName="Doe").put() animal = Animals(AnimalName="Tiger").put() people_list = [] people_list_keys = [] query = People.all() query.filter('FirstName', 'Patrick') query.get() for person in query: people_list.append(person.FirstName) ...



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