Hot answers tagged

8

There are a few things going on here. Most importantly, and this is something that will be clarified in the documentation very soon, the Search API Call quota also accounts for the number of documents being added/updated. So a single Add call that inserts 10 documents will reduce your daily Search API Call quota by 10. Yes, the maximum number of documents ...


6

Use unique identifiers for each "tag". Then you can create a document like: doc = search.Document(fields=[ search.TextField(name='tags', value='tag1 tag2 tag3'), ]) search.Index(name='tags').put(doc) You can even use numbers (ids) as strings: doc = search.Document(fields=[ search.TextField(name='tags', value='123 456 789'), ]) And query using ...


6

On June 28, 2012, Google integrated the GeoPoint class into the Google App Engine Search API library with the specific intent of making spatial points searchable. GeoPoints are stored as GeoFields within the Search Document. Google provides this support documentation outlining the use of the GeoPoint with the Search API. The following example declares a ...


5

You don't. The search API needs to search "documents" that you have created, not models from the datastore. Build documents structured with fields to describe the data you wish to search Create an index of documents you wish to search Construct queries to search the index Build search requests to run queries against the documents in your application ...


5

You should add as many fields as 'tags' you have, all with the same field_name: doc = search.Document(fields=[ search.TextField(name='tag', value=t) for t in tags ]) As in the docs: A field can contain only one value, which must match the field's type. Field names do not have to be unique. A document can have multiple fields with the same name and ...


5

Add an atom field to each document, containing the value of the language code; then search on the value of that atom field.


4

I believe the issue is the following. Your query will select up to 10K documents, then those are sorted according to your distance sort expression and returned. (That is, the sort is in fact not over all 400k documents.) So I suspect that some of the geographically closer points are not included in this 10k selection. That's why things work better when you ...


4

It's Python syntax for 1024 squared. Documentation: [the operator] yields its left argument raised to the power of its right argument.


3

In general, 'or' queries aren't efficient in any database, and that includes the search API - they all require doing multiple independent queries, and gluing the results together. The fanout problem can be handled much better by the prospective search API.


3

I don't believe geosearch works in the dev app server yet; try with your deployed app.


3

use ndb for you Models where you have Model Hooks to index entities after putting them with a _post_put_hook. for example: class MyModel(ndb.Model): title = ndb.StringProperty() def _post_put_hook(self, future): fields = [search.TextField(name='title', value=self.title)] doc = search.Document(doc_id=self.key.id(), fields=fields) ...


3

I think (can't find a validation for it) that there is a per minute quota limit, you should index your documents using a queue to make sure you gradually index them.


3

Since you have tagged gae-search I assume your question refers to an index of the Search API (i.e. full text search service, not NDB/HRD datastore index). Currently you can only delete the documents in an index, but you can't delete the index itself, e.g. issue 8235 and 8490. This restriction of Search API applies to all languages supported in Google App ...


3

First of all, if you're caring about 1NF and normalization forget about the datastore, you need Google Cloud SQL (MySQL) or any other relational database. Wikipedia says : First normal form (1NF) is a property of a relation in a relational database If you build your app on this "NOSQL", hierarchical, key-value datastore, it means that you're in need ...


3

A big plus 1 to the other answer from @Michael. In a addition I would suggest you move over to ndb, db.ReferenceProperty is problematic in that you have to jump through hoops to ensure you fetch the references efficiently. Looping and dereferencing with mycity.region is very expensive because of the multiple roundtrips to the datastore. If you want to ...


3

You should store any important data in Datastore. It has redundancy and resiliency - it is your "MASTER". You should then pass off data to Search for... wait for it... searching! That might include the ID of your Datastore record. You could then retrieve your full data object from Memcache or Datastore via batch gets if you need more fields than are ...


3

You have a couple of options, but mainly Appscale. Business: http://www.appscale.com/ Developers: https://github.com/AppScale/appscale/wiki AppScale is a platform that allows users to deploy and host their own Google App Engine applications. It executes automatically over Amazon EC2, Rackspace, Google Compute Engine, Eucalyptus, Openstack, ...


2

The search API requires you to add documents to the search backend in order to be searchable. For your static resources this means you have to crawl and add them to the search backend using the search API. You probably want to do this after every upload. Maybe the easiest way is to have a cron job that traverses your files and checks their timestamps. If ...


2

You can't check Search quota usage right now. It'll be viewable in admin console soon.


2

It is true that the Search API's documents can include numeric data, and can easily be updated, but as you say, if you're doing a lot of updates, it could be non-optimal to be modifying the documents so frequently. One design you might consider would store the numeric data in Datastore entities, but make heavy use of a cache as well-- either memcache or a ...


2

My current solution: With the timestamp as a DateTime, I store the date in a Date field type, and then I get the milliseconds of the day and store this as a Number. I then construct the query for the search API using the numeric operators against these two fields, e.g.: dayLastUpdated >= 2013-3-13 AND timeLastUpdated > 82884753


2

Fix released in 1.7.7.1 SDK for Java. See here


2

It is not true that "multiple tag fields is not possible". You can have multiple fields with the same name.


2

store the data in the datastore (if it's more than 10K) then fire off a task to perform the indexing, and return a response to the user. You haven't said if your using python, java or go. If your using python look at https://developers.google.com/appengine/articles/deferred for info about the deferred lib, which is an easy way to start using tasks with ...


2

Could it be the API changes in those versions? Version 1.8.3 - August 6, 2013 Published a major rewrite of the Search API documentation. Please see: https://developers.google.com/appengine/docs/python/search/ or the bugfix.. Version 1.8.4 - September 9, 2013 Fixed a unicode issue associated with expressions in the Search API. A search with snippeted ...


2

Custom scoring is one of our top priority feature requests. We're hoping to have a good way to do this sort of thing as soon as possible. In your particular case, you could of course achieve the desired result by doing two separate queries: the first one with field restriction on "title", and the second restricted on "body".


2

Oops, did not read closely enough, the answer is in the same place Location-Based Queries (Geosearch) # a query string like this comes from the client query = "distance(store_location, geopoint(-33.857, 151.215)) < 45000" try: index = search.Index(config.STORE_INDEX_NAME) search_results = index.search(query) for doc in search_results: # process ...


2

Save employee entity. Get the id. Set this id as a document id, index the document. Both steps can be done in the same server call. Just move your makePersistent() before you create a document.


2

The doc_id isn't "just another field"; it's a separate attribute of the Document object. Try like this: search_results = index.search(query); for doc in search_result.results: d = doc.doc_id


2

No, you can't use download_data to backup full text search stored indexes. They are like datastores functionally and they are stored similar. If you want to "backup" the data, you can programmatically fetch them and copy them into another search index and then save it. Or simply pull it out and save it to Cloud Storage or something similar. In summary, ...



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