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614

Working for about 4-5 years with software/firmware development and environment testing of miniaturized satellites*, I would like to share my experience here. *(miniaturized satellites are a lot more prone to single event upsets than bigger satellites due to its relatively small, limited sizes for its electronic components) To be very concise and direct: ...


344

As noted in other answers, the problem is that you use gcc with no compiler options set. If you do this, it defaults to what is called "gnu90", which is a non-standard implementation of the old, withdrawn C90 standard from 1990. In the old C90 standard there was a major flaw in the C language: if you didn't declare a prototype before using a function, it ...


330

NASA has a paper on radiation-hardened software. It describes three main tasks: Regular monitoring of memory for errors then scrubbing out those errors, robust error recovery mechanisms, and the ability to reconfigure if something no longer works. Note that the memory scan rate should be frequent enough that multi-bit errors rarely occur, as most ECC ...


155

It's because the file names are different (although the strings output is the same). If you try modifying the file itself (rather than having two files), you'll notice that the output binaries are no longer different. As both Jens and I said, it's because GCC dumps a whole load of metadata into the binaries it builds, including the exact source filename (and ...


128

Here's what's going on: default_random_engine in libstdc++ (GCC's standard library) is minstd_rand0, which is a simple linear congruential engine: typedef linear_congruential_engine<uint_fast32_t, 16807, 0, 2147483647> minstd_rand0; The way this engine generates random numbers is xi+1 = (16807xi + 0) mod 2147483647. Therefore, if the seeds are ...


125

You don't have a prototype declared for f1() in main.c, so it is implicitly defined as int f1(), meaning it is a function that takes an unknown number of arguments and returns an int. If int and bool are of different sizes, this will result in undefined behavior. For example, on my machine, int is 4 bytes and bool is one byte. Since the function is ...


89

This is due to undefined behavior, you are accessing the array mc out of bounds on the last iteration of your loop. Some compilers may perform aggressive loop optimization around the assumptions of no undefined behavior. The logic would be similar to the following: Accessing mc out of bounds is undefined behavior Assume no undefined behavior Therefore di ...


87

Here are some thoughts and ideas: Use ROM more creatively. Store anything you can in ROM. Instead of calculating things, store look-up tables in ROM. (Make sure your compiler is outputting your look-up tables to the read-only section! Print out memory addresses at runtime to check!) Store your interrupt vector table in ROM. Of course, run some tests to see ...


72

Got stuck as I was trying to a go get ... I think it was related to git. Here is how was able to fix it ... Entered following in terminal: sudo xcodebuild -license This will open agreement. Go all the way to end and type "agree". That takes care of go get issues ... It was quite interesting how unrelated things were ...


70

-fsingle-precision-constant flag can be used. It causes floating-point constants to be loaded in single precision even when this is not exact. Note- This will also use single precision constants in operations on double precision variables.


68

You may also be interested in the rich literature on the subject of algorithmic fault tolerance. This includes the old assignment: Write a sort that correctly sorts its input when a constant number of comparisons will fail (or, the slightly more evil version, when the asymptotic number of failed comparisons scales as log(n) for n comparisons). A place to ...


67

I guess the question that needs to be answered why well-intentioned people would write the checks in the first place. The most common case is probably if you have a class that is part of a naturally occurring recursive call. If you had: struct Node { Node* left; Node* right; }; in C, you might write: void traverse_in_order(Node* n) { if(!n) ...


61

This is not too difficult using the std::system command. Also raw string literals allow us to insert multiline text which is useful for typing in program parts: #include <cstdlib> #include <fstream> // Use raw string literal for easy coding auto prog = R"~( #include <iostream> int main() { std::cout << "Hello World!" << ...


60

It does so because the "practical" code was broken and involved undefined behavior to begin with. There's no reason to use a null this, other than as a micro-optimization, usually a very premature one. It's a dangerous practice, since adjustment of pointers due to class hierarchy traversal can turn a null this into a non-null one. So, at the very least, the ...


58

C11, 6.8.6.4 "The return statement": A return statement with an expression shall not appear in a function whose return type is void. No, you may not use an expression, even if it is of void type. From the foreword of the same document: Major changes in the second edition included: [...] return without expression not permitted in ...


55

Both programs do exactly the same thing. They use the same exact algorithm, and given its low complexity, their performance is mostly bound to efficiency of the input and output handling. scanning the input with scanf("%d", &fact_num); on one side and cin >> fact_num; on the other does not seem very costly either way. In fact it should be less ...


52

The [] is a flexible array member. They do not count towards the total size of the struct, because the C standard explicitly says so: 6.7.2.1/18 As a special case, the last element of a structure with more than one named member may have an incomplete array type; this is called a flexible array member. In most situations, the flexible array member is ...


49

Use warnings instead: -Wdouble-promotion warns about implicit float to double promotion, as in your example. -Wfloat-conversion will warn about cases where you may still be assigning doubles to floats. This is a better solution than simply forcing double values to the nearest float value. Your floating-point code is still compliant, and you won't get any ...


45

You are passing a non-bool pointer as a bool pointer (the underlying item is not of the bool type) and I'm pretty certain that this (known as type punning) invokes undefined behaviour. Hence the code is free to do whatever it wants. In this particular case: int a = (*b ? 0 : 1); you are telling it to convert false to 1 and true to 0. If you were to ...


44

Another trick to make iostreams faster when you use both cin and cout is to call cin.tie(nullptr); By default, when you input anything from cin, it flushes cout. It can significantly harm performance if you do interleaved input and output. This is done for the command line interface uses, where you show some prompt and then wait for data: std::string ...


43

Redundant stores are usually down to aliasing; in this case gcc would be unable to prove to its satisfaction that the store to X[0] does not affect table. It makes a big difference how the variables are passed to the routine; if they are globals or members of the same larger struct then proving non-aliasing is easier. Example: void f1(uint64_t X[2]) { ...


42

The C standard says A declaration other than a static_assert declaration shall declare at least a declarator (other than the parameters of a function or the members of a structure or union), a tag, or the members of an enumeration. C++ says In a simple-declaration, the optional init-declarator-list can be omitted only when declaring a class (Clause ...


40

The Wikipedia example is very illuminating. It clearly shows how it allows to save one assembly instruction. Without restrict: void f(int *a, int *b, int *x) { *a += *x; *b += *x; } Pseudo assembly: load R1 ← *x ; Load the value of x pointer load R2 ← *a ; Load the value of a pointer add R2 += R1 ; Perform Addition set R2 → *a ; Update ...


38

Since you are incrementing di before you use it to index mc, the fourth time through the loop your will be referencing mc[4], which is past the end of your array, which could in turn lead to troublesome behavior.


37

However, I expected the parentheses to have b1 incremented before its value is assigned to a1 You should not have expected that: placing parentheses around an increment expression does not alter the application of its side effects. Side effects (in this case, it means writing 11 into b1) get applied some time after retrieving the current value of b1. ...


33

For those facing this problem in OS X El Capitan, this solution from a therubyracer issue thread was what finally worked for me: brew tap homebrew/versions brew install v8-315 gem install libv8 -v '3.16.14.13' -- --with-system-v8 gem install therubyracer -- --with-v8-dir=/usr/local/opt/v8-315 bundle install I had also run brew install gcc prior, but I'm ...


32

Quoting from the C99:6.5.2.4: The result of the postfix ++ operator is the value of the operand. After the result is obtained, the value of the operand is incremented. (That is, the value 1 of the appropriate type is added to it.) See the discussions of additive operators and compound assignment for information on constraints, types, and ...


32

From this godbolt session clang is able to perform all the pow calculations at compile time. It knows at compile time what the values of k and n are and it just constant folds the calculation: .LCPI0_0: .quad 4604480259023595110 # double 0.69999999999999996 .LCPI0_1: .quad 4602498675187552091 # double 0.48999999999999994 .LCPI0_2: ...


32

No, this is not possible portably, and I'm not sure to guess exactly what you want to achieve. Terminology Perhaps you want some non-local jump. Read carefully about setjmp.h, coroutines, call stack, exception handling, continuations, and continuation-passing-style. Understanding what call/cc is in Scheme should be very beneficial. setjmp and longjmp ...



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